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Author Topic: Best Outboard speakers  (Read 3698 times)
KE5ZZY
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Posts: 3




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« on: October 22, 2010, 09:12:04 AM »

What's the 'very best' outboard speaker for your station?  I've tried darn near everything out there and you might be surprised as to 'who' the winner was.  I've always been 'unimpressed' with the itsy bitsy speakers on all the rigs I've had (Ft-101, TS-830s, FT-102, Icom 718) and have jumped through hoops and alot of money trying Yaesu and Kenwood filtered speakers, Radio shack and on and on.  None of the above really sounded the 'sound' I wanted.  After 'raiding the attic' I found a 60's edition of an old Sears portable reel to reel tape recorder with attached hinged speakers.  A quick plug change and 'wow' .... The best sounding audio I've ever heard from my radios!!  I should have left my wallet intact and visited my attic boneyard a whole lot sooner.
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KD0NFY
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Posts: 75




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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2010, 11:07:28 AM »

I've tried a few since I've spent so much time listening.  (Not licensed yet)  The best on by far is an 8" Weber alnico speaker in a Fender Champ cabinet.  Nothing else comes close.  I'm thinking eventually I'm going to have a cabinet made for my station that will be just like the Champ cabinet without the amp chassis cutout. 

The speaker itself is $35:  https://taweber.powweb.com/weber/asig8.htm and I don't think there's anything better available at any price.  The speaker naturally rolls off lows and highs by nature of its design. 
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2010, 05:56:05 PM »

Most any inexpensive bookshelf HF speaker will provide decent sound.

I long ago gave up on caring about external speakers except for those occasions where I have visitors to the shack. For myself, I much prefer a good set of headphones that block out ambient noise. They have the additional benefit of allowing a lower overall volume.

As a result, I have two Heil ProSets (one with the DX element and one with the rag chew element) that I use almost exclusively. The only exception is I use a Shure 55S with my Collins KWM-2A.
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KI4Z
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Posts: 37




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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2010, 07:52:20 PM »

My approach has always been to buy a good looking speaker that includes the LC filters.  I've bought a few Kenwood SP-820 speakers for a decent price.  I then replace the astonishly cheap stock speaker with a high quality and high power HiFi midrange speaker with a large magnet.  Given that the frequency response of interest is only 300 to 3KHz,  it probably makes zero difference, but the sound is excellent and I can turn it up loud and know the speaker isn't distorting the audio. 

mark
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2237




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« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2010, 12:29:44 PM »

Ditto W3LK
Buy an in expensive "shelf" speaker, and
out your money on a good set of cans or headset.
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N8CMQ
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Posts: 353




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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2010, 07:05:23 PM »

I have a set of aviation phones, a set of cans and a Hallicrafters 6X9 speaker. All three perform well, but the cans are for CX, and the aviation headset works well for SSB, and the 6X9 is for visitors, or when no one else is home...
But with my tin ears, (wear ear protection with loud sounds, kiddies!) my volume control is up higher than most people can stand...
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2375




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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2010, 11:30:49 PM »

Most any inexpensive bookshelf HF speaker will provide decent sound.


+1 for that thought.   I'm using a Radio Shack 2-way system -- 5" woofer and tweeter, in a wood box -- that sounds pretty good.  Cost $30 per pair.  Cheaper alternatives are available at most thrift shops.

           Charles
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K8KAS
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Posts: 569




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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2010, 06:33:17 AM »

The one and only "Sounds Sweet" speaker system. The Heil EQ'ed and powered speaker sounded great as well IF you can keep the RF out of it. I don't think it is made any longer.  Denny K8KAS 73
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KB6YH
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Posts: 43




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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2010, 11:01:12 AM »

I like sony bookshelf speakers, but not ones with thin  backs. I find them at Goodwills for low prices and they sound great. I sometimes use a stereo rcvr for an amp between the radio and speaker. Bill
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N3QE
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Posts: 2158




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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2010, 09:02:13 AM »

My favorite for radio use is a big old 10" or 12" speaker in a wooden box. Nice and mellow. Avoids the tinniness I deplore in most small PC or built-into-radio speakers.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5997




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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2010, 08:39:32 AM »

If you know of any speaker 'systems' that are going to be thrown out, and you have a chance to cannibalize them, just take the midrange speaker out.  You can put together a small enclosure--or sometimes you can just remove a cheap speaker from such an enclosure and out the midrange in.  I've got a couple like that, but I find that commo speakers from older Motorola or GE 'control head' type radios (where the speaker is separate in a metal or plastic enclosure) work just as well, and they're made so the sound from them is able to be heard over other noise.

You can sometimes find them at electronics fleamarkets or hamfests for a few dollars each.
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