Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 6m cq ww?  (Read 674 times)
KG6FUT
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« on: May 01, 2001, 08:47:28 PM »

Has anyone tryed 6m cw contesting? I would like to know because I am bilding my cw 6m recever and transmiter wich will be done soon.
Logged
KD4ZD
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2001, 08:44:29 AM »

Yes, but the problem is; people keep sending CW "CQ" on the SSB Call frequency.  I will not answer them on 50.125 except on SSB.
Logged
K0RS
Member

Posts: 745




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2001, 04:05:06 AM »

Hearing a CQ on CW on 50.125 isn't a problem...unless of course you can't copy CW.  I've answered numerous CQ's on code on 50.125.  I there is a "problem" on 50.125 it is that people on both modes, CW and SSB, don't move off the calling frequency when the band is open.  (un?)Common sense should be the order of the day.  Gentleman's agreement is that 50.125 is a calling frequency, not a working frequency.  Use the same courtesy on CW that you do on SSB and move your QSO off the calling frequency if you establish a contact there.  You will also hear a combination of SSB and CW on 50.110, the DX calling frequency, when there is TE, F2 or other long skip present.  Again, don't hog the frequency, regardless of mode.  CW is much more common on 6 meters during contests.  It tends to mix in with SSB signals more than on HF bands because the lower 100 kHz of the band is more or less devoted to beacons, so CW is forced higher up the band.  Just because SSB is more common on 6m than CW doesn't mean that code is excluded from the calling frequency.  When the band breaks open, signal quickly proliferate over the band.  When this happens it is probably best to avoid 50.125 altogether as it becomes nearly unusable with QRM.  Under those conditions just work 'em where you find 'em!

CU on 6,

Larry
Logged
N0XE
Member

Posts: 197




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2003, 11:38:06 AM »

Cross  mode contacts have been around for a long time and in the old Novice days, were quite popular as it gave Novices a chance to talk with a SSB station and added a lot of excitement to those new/beginner hams who was trying to upgrade. There is nothing wrong with using CW on 50.125 or 50.200 but  once you make a contact either on SSB,  CW or cross band mode,  move off and let others use the calling Frequency. I can remember as a Novice checking in to some Canadian nets around 7140 many years ago and the thrill I got when they asked for check ins and I checked in via CW and the net control would respond via SSB. Sometimes he would switch to CW as well. Great fun, don't see it as much these days as many hams hate CW and never try to master it. It is a shame as it could really be a powerful weapon in their radio arsonal. Keep the RF flying, 73  N0XE
Logged
KE4RWS
Member

Posts: 113




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2003, 04:21:05 AM »

Amen to moving off frequency once you've established contact!

That's among one of the most aggravating issues I've seen on 6-meters is the thoughtlesness of some folks who don't moce off frequency when they make contact with someone. I know that sometimes some people just don't think about it but it's very important to keep that in mind!

Every morning as I head home from work I hear the same individual on 52.525 FM just chewing the fat with other's on the FM calling frequency of all places. It's incredibly rude to lock up the National Calling Channel like that, not only for local users but for DX conditions as well.

Once you make contact, move off. It's that simple!


Randy Evans
  KE4RWS
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!