Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 160m contest - how far?  (Read 3550 times)
M0GTK
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« on: January 30, 2011, 08:06:02 AM »

Curious newbie...

1.800-1.810 MHz was absolutely alive with CW, 04:30 GMT today (QTH London, pitiful little random wire antenna).

My 12 wpm Morse, 1988 vintage, has completely withered; 'CQ' and 'K' - that's about all that's left. I couldn't do any of the call signs. There was no accompanying SSB phone activity.

I almost never hear Top Band signals - local QRM and antenna difficulties. I rarely even bother to listen, so this morning was a pleasant surprise.

Note that I identified the bottom 100kHz of 160m. According to my book, this is a US/FCC allocation. The UK and AFAIK, most of the rest of the world, only get to use 1.810 upwards.

Is it possible that I was hearing signals from the US? I had thought of 160 as being  sort of local band.
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8847


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2011, 08:53:56 AM »

Is it possible that I was hearing signals from the US? I had thought of 160 as being  sort of local band.

It's certainly possible.  Contest stations have exceptionally strong signals and conditions were quite good last night between England and  here in Maryland.  I've worked to have good 160m reception from my location but these stations were loud enough that I could probably have heard them on just a wire.

There is DX potential on 160m.  I've worked 131 countries there, and sometimes Europe comes in strong.  Here's a clip of Geoff, G3XGC sending his name and signal report to a stateside station:  http://n3ox.net/files/g3xgc_101307.mp3

I think one of the reasons it seems like a "local" band is because the DX is so much weaker than the locals 90% of the time and the locals are so strong.    It's not like 20m where you might have the same signal strength from mainland Europe and from the Midwest USA.  The DX is often  near the noise level, while the locals with even modest dipoles will have bone-crushing signals because local propagation is so good.  So you might not even try to listen for the signals at the noise level.  And the DX is almost all on CW anyway.  Every once and a while you'll find some SSB DX activity in the 1840-1850 frequency range but it's rare.

If you know to look for it, though, the DX is there.  My best DX distance-wise is Australia.  The bulk of my DX contacts have been with Europe, Carribean, and Central America.  I made a map of my 160m QSOs, most made over the past four years:

http://n3ox.net/files/N3OX_160QSO_013011.jpg

Most of the USA QSOs shown are from contests. 



Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
WX7G
Member

Posts: 6052




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2011, 09:58:56 AM »

Yes you heard signals from the US. Europe was working even the Western US both nights of the contest and conditions were not exceptional.

The SSB half of this contest - the CQ WW 160 meter contest - will be held Feb 25-27.

CONTEST RULES:  http://www.cq160.com/
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 10:13:06 AM by WX7G » Logged
WS4T
Member

Posts: 182




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2011, 01:26:50 AM »

You might have heard some European stations in the 1800 to 1810 kHz window. I heard a few Europeans calling CQ there.

In Europe, the band was utterly packed above 1810 kHz. Maybe some frustrated hams, unfamiliar with their license terms, decided to exploit the more open space in the 10 kHz below the band limit.
Logged
DJ1YFK
Member

Posts: 188


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2011, 04:32:13 AM »

Unfortunately that's true.

There were some juicy multipliers like 3V8SS who operated below 1810kHz for most of the contest, which means that any EU calling them was out of band -- and there were plenty of them. In many cases it's probably ignorance of the band edges and license conditions, but in some cases I am sure that people called knowing they were out of band.

Luckily 3V8SS called us when we were CQing up in the band; and the other rare mult spotted below 1809 a few times, A62ER, was not audible here. :-)

73
Logged

PA3GVI
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2011, 12:56:10 AM »

PI4W was active for the second time in the CQ160CW contest.
Having not much time we had just putt up a 90 foot vertical, no beverages or other receiving antennas.
During two nights we worked very nice DX like, VP9, P4, XE, C6, HI, V3, JT, PJ2, many US stations.
In our greyline on sunday worked a bunch of West Coast stations, very nice!
Overal: 69 countries and 33 states/Prov.

73, Rob/PA3GVI
PI4W crew member

www.sitekreator.com/pa3gvi
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!