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Author Topic: Japan tragedy, will it affect the “Big 3” radio suppliers?  (Read 3485 times)
KJ6HYC
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Posts: 103




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« on: March 14, 2011, 11:28:43 AM »

Does anyone know if any of the big 3 suppliers (Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu) are in the tragic EQ/tsunami area?  Yaesu is in Tokyo, however that may not be the manufacturing facility.

73
Wayne - KJ6HYC
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VE4EGL
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 01:13:49 PM »

The quake and subsequent tsunami are affecting the entire country, not any specific area.  I think most of Japan's resources are currently going toward survival and damage control.  Even if the plants were still open I doubt they'd find many people willing to come to work right now.
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I used to think you needed an elaborate setup to work DX, then I made a QSO 3,000 miles away using a dipole 8ft off the ground in the middle of a forest.
W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2011, 05:13:49 PM »

Being that most equipment is actually made in China now I do not see much impact on production but possibly R&D though.
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WB2EOD
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Posts: 219




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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 06:46:10 AM »

From what I have heard, Japan has a pretty substantial number of ham operators. 

Does anybody know what kind of emphasis the Japanese amateur radio community places on public service activity?   
Has anybody heard or participated in any traffic into and out of Japan?

While we appreciate Wayne's concern for the commercial side, the question we should be asking is:
"What role is ham radio playing in the rescue and recovery efforts?"

73
WB2EOD
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W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 07:59:19 AM »

With advent of web, cellular, smart phones,  and even cheap forms of public radios, Ham radio is not as big a roll player here at times like this as it would have been 20 or 30 years ago. Yes some of this modern device need backbone support but even emergency cellular support can be deployed pretty quickly today in disaster areas and provide field communication convince not possible with ham radio. Technology has moved past its need in a lot of ways.
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KJ6HYC
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Posts: 103




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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 10:55:56 AM »

I agree, the only thing that I have seen so far is a request to keep specified frequencys clear, and the Red Cross donation request for the Japaneese tragedy, in which I will be donating.

73
Wayne - KJ6HYC


From what I have heard, Japan has a pretty substantial number of ham operators. 

Does anybody know what kind of emphasis the Japanese amateur radio community places on public service activity?   
Has anybody heard or participated in any traffic into and out of Japan?

While we appreciate Wayne's concern for the commercial side, the question we should be asking is:
"What role is ham radio playing in the rescue and recovery efforts?"

73
WB2EOD


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IZ5PQT
Member

Posts: 38




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« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2011, 05:54:01 AM »

I was surprised listening to normal QSOs with Europe on 40 m from a JA station on past saturday. This is why initially I thought the situation was not catastrophic. Of course that ham was in the southwest region of Japan.
Giovanni IZ5PQT

 
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 1957




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« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2011, 01:33:48 PM »

Does anyone know if any of the big 3 suppliers (Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu) are in the tragic EQ/tsunami area?  Yaesu is in Tokyo, however that may not be the manufacturing facility.

I believe the main Yaesu factory is in Fukishima, which would place it near the nuke problems. I think Kenwood does most manufacturing in Malayasia. Do not know about Icom.

I believe it is going to affect the hamradio market tremendously.

There may be  shortages which could raise prices.The Japanese could turn in all their USA bonds and securities and bankrupt the USA. It could be another Chernobyl or worse. I see lots of scenarios and none of them are pretty.

This disaster could be a huge game changer for many products...

http://www.kenwoodusa.com/NewsArchive/2011/20fe1b7b-fe8a-4a94-b371-bb97d0fff096


Stan K9IUQ
« Last Edit: March 16, 2011, 01:42:02 PM by K9IUQ » Logged
KD8HMO
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Posts: 228




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« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2011, 06:29:26 PM »

Oh dear, maybe someone in the US might have to start making ham radio equipment again? Good time to revive the Heathkit name  Grin
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K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1957




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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2011, 06:54:44 PM »

Oh dear, maybe someone in the US might have to start making ham radio equipment again?

Can you say Ten-Tec, Flexradio and Elecraft, all 3 making hamradios in the USA...

Stan K9IUQ
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W8JX
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Posts: 6047




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« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2011, 07:36:25 PM »

Oh dear, maybe someone in the US might have to start making ham radio equipment again? Good time to revive the Heathkit name  Grin

Last few Kenwood radios I bought said made in China. They are no longer made in Japan. Only fall out I have read about production related is that some US made Japanese cars rely on some parts from Japan and they may be lacking soon. Japan will bounce back one day stronger than ever. It is in their "blood".
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K9IUQ
Member

Posts: 1957




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« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2011, 03:05:03 AM »


I believe the main Yaesu factory is in Fukishima, which would place it near the nuke problems.


http://yaesu.com/pdf/Dear%20Vertex%20Standard%20Friends_v02.pdf

Stan K9IUQ
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N0YXB
Member

Posts: 320




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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 08:53:50 AM »

I'm more concerned about my friends and the people of Japan.  These manufacturers will be fine.  For those interested in helping financially consider the Japanese American Citizens League, www.jacl.org.

Vince
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2011, 05:58:15 PM »

Seriously. 

Concern right now should be with that of human health and welfare. 

Not with whether or not you will still be able to purchase a new toy at a low price. 


73
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3894




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« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2011, 07:16:31 PM »

From what I have heard, Japan has a pretty substantial number of ham operators.

Yes and no.

In Japan, "station" and "operator" licenses are completely separate. A ham needs both to have a station and operate it.

Operator licenses are free and do not expire. There are four license classes, and one ham can simultaneously hold any and all of them.

So when you see the large numbers of JA hams mentioned, what you're seeing is the number of operator licenses issued since 1952, when Japan took back the task of issuing amateur licenses. And one amateur may account for up to four operator licenses.

OTOH, station licenses cost a small fee and must be renewed annually.

According to the AH0A website, as of March 31 2009, there were a total of 3,278,988 operator licenses but only 489,256 station licenses.

Does anybody know what kind of emphasis the Japanese amateur radio community places on public service activity?

My understanding, from an old QST article, is that it's not much emphasized over there. I could be mistaken, however.

From what I have read and seen, communication isn't much of a problem for them right now.

I hope and pray that they can get the reactors under control and begin the process of rebuilding their country. And that the human toll (death and injury) doesn't go any higher.

If amateur equipment production is curtailed, I think we hams can make do with the rigs we have, and ones made by other companies, for a while.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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