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Author Topic: ALS 600 ALC Question...  (Read 2452 times)
VE6NU
Member

Posts: 26




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« on: March 20, 2011, 10:34:55 AM »

Hello every body,

I am awaiting the arrival of the Ameritron ALS-600 within the next few days.
My question is whether ALC or no ALC?
I will be using the Ameritron Model ARB-704 between my rig and the amp; that should help right?   
The rig I am using will be the Yaesu FT-2000D.

Tu for reading this.

73, de Frank
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2011, 11:10:20 AM »

I'd connect and use the ALC.

The ARB-704 does absolutely nothing for the ALC.  It just passes the line straight through from the amp to the rig, and provides a patch cable connection point; but it doesn't buffer or modify the ALC in any way.
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W5WDV
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2011, 01:03:32 PM »

I agree and am running a couple of ALS-600's myself. The 704 is a cheap insurance policy should a back pulse come back into the transceiver.... I've brought this up several times in discussions like this and some shoot specs at me saying you don't need it. Look at it this way, if you have to ship your transceiver back because it some how received an over voltage back pulse, the shipping alone will get you close to the cost of an buffer interface. I do run a couple of 704's, they are not relay driven so they are silent and pretty much instantaneous in SSB mode.

Here's what I've learned about solid state amps:

1) don't overdrive. run about 50-60 watts in. I know they say 100, they are pushing the limit so prove you are smarter and resist the temptation!
2) use the ALC. THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE CONFUSING because they mix CW settings in with SSB and then spread it out in several placed in the manual. Do a search here on eham, you'll find good info on how to actually set it up correctly/easily.
3) don't try to squeeze every last watt out of it, won't make any difference on the receive end (except for increased IMD, splatter, and distorted audio.
4) accept the fact that it's not a tube amp so be happy with 400-500 watts of good clean output on the ALS-600 and enjoy the compliments on your audio, and long service life.
5) always run a buffer interface. As stated, cheap insurance! One exception, amps from the same manufacture as the transceiver which were designed for each others interface scheme.

Good luck, have fun hope to hear you on the air!

Bill - W5WDV
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2011, 06:58:33 PM »

Bill (WDV) the ARB-704 does absolutely nothing to the ALC line: It goes in one port, and out the other, with no modification of any kind.

It does buffer the amplifier keying relay, but I don't know any rig in the world that can't key an ALS-600 just as it is: It requires 12V at 100mA, and every rig I've ever used or seen can handle that by itself.  The ALS also has reverse spike protection on the key line, built in.

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W5JO
Member

Posts: 59




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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2011, 07:40:44 PM »

If you don't have a waveform monitor, get one.  Then with that, monitor your transmitted signal and do not hook the ALC to the transceiver.  It is very easy to cause more trouble with that hooked than you might expect.  If the timing of the sampling circuit in the amp and the timing of the AGC in the transceiver aren't just right it may cause overshoot.  That will cause your adjacent frequency friends to hate you and you mant not even know it is happening, because your meters will look just fine.

Hook up a monitor or use a common oscilloscope as a monitor.  They are cheap and easy to use and your signal will be much better if you drive the amp properly and not rely on the AGC circuit to do a job right, it might not work.
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W5WDV
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2011, 05:52:45 AM »

WB2WIK,
We are in agreement on the ARB704's function... Here I was saying that the ALC instructions were confusing only to give a confusing answer myself and mix the two subjects into the same paragraph! I still believe it's a good idea to run one whether ALC is in the equation or not. Subjects should have been addressed in separate post.

73's
Bill
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VE6NU
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2011, 10:28:40 AM »

Bill (W5WDV), I will follow your instruction as per your latest post (March 21, 201).
However, I shall also put the ARB-704 buffer in line for added protection.

Thank you all very much for your input; I can use all help I can get!

Great day to all.

73, de Frank, VE6NU
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W5WDV
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2011, 10:44:12 AM »

Frank,
One more consideration that Ameritron offered....
When choosing mode FM, RTTY, or CW, use RTTY as the last option and in short durations while setting amplifier particulars.

FM would be the first choice on an Icom radio, CW on others. FM will give you a solid carrier without stressing the amp prior to being set. If you are forced to use AM, lower the power to less than 10 watts.

Again, this is direct from Ameritron so it's probably good advice.

Good plan! Good DXing!
Bill
« Last Edit: March 21, 2011, 10:52:25 AM by W5WDV » Logged
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