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Author Topic: Can the IC-V8000 be unmodified?  (Read 8475 times)
N4NYY
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« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2011, 05:36:44 PM »

Quote
Some people just don't want to take the chance.  Some communities have restrictions on what radios can be put in cars (especially in New York state) and radios have been known to have been confiscated and examined.  If the radio was proven to be able to be programmed for a non-ham frequency, (public service bands are right above the 144 mhz ham band) it is possible that the person who it belongs to can be in some very hot water.

It HAS happened.

OK. Let's got one thing straight. I am aware of no laws that restrict what radio can be out in your car. If there is such a law, please post it, since all laws are on the books.

Secondly, is confiscation. Again, I am aware of no laws where they can take your radio. If you commit a crime and your car is evidence, then they can take your radio or whatever else is in your car.

Thirdly, there is no cop or enforcement agency that would have any clue if a V8000 has a MARS mod or not. Also, it is not under the jurisdiction of local law enforcement to enforce out of band or freq transmission.

Let's not make things up here. If it has happened, then state where and when. Hint, saying it had happened 100 times, doesn't make it so.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2011, 08:23:41 AM »

 OK. Let's got one thing straight. I am aware of no laws that restrict what radio can be out in your car. If there is such a law, please post it, since all laws are on the books.

There are certain cities and towns that restrict what radios--either scanners or two way radios--a person can install in their cars, especially if that radio can transmit on the police or public service frequencies.  There was an article here one or two years ago about a ham in upstate New York who was stopped and ticketed because his VHF transceiver could receive police calls.  I WILL try to find it and provide a link.

Quote
 Secondly, is confiscation. Again, I am aware of no laws where they can take your radio. If you commit a crime and your car is evidence, then they can take your radio or whatever else is in your car.

In the case I mentioned above, I'm pretty sure of reading that the police took his radio from him and held it--until his court date.  He won the case--after spending a lot of money--and got it back.

Quote
 Thirdly, there is no cop or enforcement agency that would have any clue if a V8000 has a MARS mod or not. Also, it is not under the jurisdiction of local law enforcement to enforce out of band or freq transmission.

You're right, the police have no jurisdiction to enforce out of band operation--UNLESS such operation is suspected ON THEIR PARTICULAR BAND, in which case laws against interference with police operations can and has been used to issue citations and confiscate radios simply because it was believed--BELIEVED--that the radio was capable of transmitting on the police frequency.

Quote
 Let's not make things up here. If it has happened, then state where and when. Hint, saying it had happened 100 times, doesn't make it so.

I never said it has happened a hundred times.  In this article, it happened once--and the article made mention of several other localities that have similar laws on their books.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2011, 08:26:18 AM by K1CJS » Logged
N4ATS
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« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2011, 02:01:24 PM »

For crying out loud people , it a darn MARS/CAP mod , MOST hams , the first thing they do is open it up. Get over it. NO ONE is ever going to bother you.
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KB3HG
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« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2011, 06:38:07 AM »

 First off, the thread seems to have shifted off tangent.

The radio works fine, I turned the transmit option off myself in the settings  because I wanted to use it as a scanner at the time. I didn't want to use it modified.  So, whether it transmits or not is not what I'm concerned about, whether or not it can be "unmodified" is what I'm looking for.  Any ideas?? 

From what he stated " I turned the transmit option off myself in the settings." This sounds like a software Setting Change. I'll assume you programmed the radio using the software and USB or serial cable. If you preformed a software change for transmit off. perform the CPU reset. push [SET(LOCK)] and MW(S.MW)], push [PWR] for 1 sec. to reset the CPU. (page IV of the manual.) Reload your .icf file. Edit and save any change to the file, if that's where you made a change. Write to the IC-V8000. Transmit should now be available.

More details of the expansion mods can be found in the files section of the Yahoo IC-V8000 group.

Tom Kb3hg
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N4NYY
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« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2011, 02:17:23 PM »

Quote
There are certain cities and towns that restrict what radios--either scanners or two way radios--a person can install in their cars, especially if that radio can transmit on the police or public service frequencies.  There was an article here one or two years ago about a ham in upstate New York who was stopped and ticketed because his VHF transceiver could receive police calls.  I WILL try to find it and provide a link.

There may be scanner laws that apply to this, but I am not aware of any police frequency on the 144 MHz band. Again, just state which cities. I would be hell bent that police could pull someone over, and immediately be able to operate his V-8000 to the tune of seeing that it is out of band. Highly unlikely. I know hams that have trouble operating such rigs (including myself), unless they sit down down with the manual.

Quote
In the case I mentioned above, I'm pretty sure of reading that the police took his radio from him and held it--until his court date.  He won the case--after spending a lot of money--and got it back.

If anything, you proved my point. He won the case, which means there is no law, or the police were out of there jurisdiction and they mis-interpreted the law. Spending alot of money guarantees nothing. He won the case, because of the law. Not because of the money he spent.

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I never said it has happened a hundred times.  In this article, it happened once--and the article made mention of several other localities that have similar laws on their books.

I was just commenting because you made claims with no proof. I was not out to tell you so. I was more or less letting the poster know that it is highly unlikely. Again, the one case you mention was won in court by the radio operator.

Listen, I assume there are some scanner laws, as there are radar detector laws in some states. But the police cannot simply pull you over and start taking your radio without cause. They won't know what radio you have, and they won't know if it has been modded.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2011, 07:19:51 PM »

If anything, you proved my point. He won the case, which means there is no law, or the police were out of there jurisdiction and they mis-interpreted the law. Spending alot of money guarantees nothing. He won the case, because of the law. Not because of the money he spent.

The point is this:  Even though he won, he had to go through the hassle of going to court and fighting them, AFTER he was stopped and his radio was taken from him.

Quote
I was just commenting because you made claims with no proof. I was not out to tell you so. I was more or less letting the poster know that it is highly unlikely. Again, the one case you mention was won in court by the radio operator.

Listen, I assume there are some scanner laws, as there are radar detector laws in some states. But the police cannot simply pull you over and start taking your radio without cause. They won't know what radio you have, and they won't know if it has been modded.

Makes no difference--especially these days.  It has happened before and it will happen again.  The way our most basic rights and privileges are being slowly taken away, it wouldn't be much of a surprise to find more and more of these things being done every day.
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W3LK
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« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2011, 11:32:23 AM »

If I remember the story correctly, the ham was stopped about 3:00 in the morning while cruising slowly through a residential area in upstate New York. The stop was done by a state trooper and the ham gave inconsistent answers to the trooper's questions. Additionally, the 2m rig in the vehicle was tuned to the local LE frequency and the trooper heard LE traffic on the radio.

Unless something has changed, radios capable of monitoring LE frequencies are illegal to have in a vehicle in NY State, and have been for several years. The radio was confiscated under NY law and was later returned after a trial.

This may not be the same case Chris is referring to, but it's the only one that I am aware of. In short, if the ham involved had not appeared to be skulking around at 3:00 AM, had not acted suspiciously to the trooper AND HAD THE 2M RIG TURNED OFF, the whole incident probably would never have happened.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2011, 02:46:53 PM by W3LK » Logged

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N4NYY
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« Reply #22 on: April 01, 2011, 03:02:45 PM »

Quote
The point is this:  Even though he won, he had to go through the hassle of going to court and fighting them, AFTER he was stopped and his radio was taken from him.

That is the case for any traffic violation to a felony. You have to go to court if you want to fight. You don't win in front of the officer. A judge or jury decides that.


Lon, reading your point, I seem to remember scanner laws with it being illegal for having a scanner in a vehicle, as far back as the 1980's. I think there are several states that still have scanner laws. My point is, if you are not acting suspiciously and you get pulled over for speeding at 2pm, I do not think he can take your radio, unless it is scanning police and he hears it, as you mentioned.   
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W3LK
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« Reply #23 on: April 01, 2011, 05:46:01 PM »


Lon, reading your point, I seem to remember scanner laws with it being illegal for having a scanner in a vehicle, as far back as the 1980's. I think there are several states that still have scanner laws.

Yes, there are. I have a list of them somewhere, but since I have neither a scanner in the vehicle or go through the majority of those states, I don't pay much attention to the list. Smiley

Quote
My point is, if you are not acting suspiciously and you get pulled over for speeding at 2pm, I do not think he can take your radio, unless it is scanning police and he hears it, as you mentioned.   

Yup, we are in agreement. FWIW, I think the last time I got stopped for anything other than a DL check was about 40 years ago. Driving the speed limit, stopping for STOP signs and not running red lights eliminates a whole bunch of hassles. <gg>
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K1CJS
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« Reply #24 on: April 01, 2011, 08:22:08 PM »

I'm still looking for the story, but I believe that wasn't the one.  The one I remember is a ham being stopped in the afternoon, by a LOCAL police officer--a fairly new officer.  The officer saw the radio and believed it was a scanner, and even though the ham told him otherwise and showed him his amateur license, the cop wouldn't accept it at all.  The radio--even though it was a ham radio and would not receive out of band (not programmed for it) was confiscated under the scanner law. 

Again, if I remember correctly, the judge chewed the cop out simply because 1. The radio was not a scanner, and 2. The ham had his license and showed it to the officer.  (The cop admitted that.)  The judge even had notice sent to the police department that employed that officer, admonishing them to train their officers better.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2011, 05:44:57 AM »

Quote
I'm still looking for the story, but I believe that wasn't the one.  The one I remember is a ham being stopped in the afternoon, by a LOCAL police officer--a fairly new officer.  The officer saw the radio and believed it was a scanner, and even though the ham told him otherwise and showed him his amateur license, the cop wouldn't accept it at all.  The radio--even though it was a ham radio and would not receive out of band (not programmed for it) was confiscated under the scanner law.

That is why he won in court. One thing about traffic court. You can win and you don't need a lawyer. I have seen many people get lawyers for traffic court, and it is an utter waste of money. Even without a lawyer, I was able to plea one ticket down from a 2 point speeding, to a zero point driving too slow. The fine was the same, but no points or moving violation. Another time, I completely beat a "rolling stop" ticket, because the officer had like 3 cars pulled over for rolling stops, and then pulled me over after I had already stopped. He did not see it, and saw me when I started up again. I fought it in court, saying that there was no way the officer could attend to 3 cars (he was on foot), and keep an eye on the corner stop. In addition, when he testifies in court, he said he had pulled me over with his car and lights, which was a complete lie (I don't think he remembered). He was on foot asking the other cars for credentials. He had given approx 150 that day for rolling stops. I ended up winning. But instead of giving me the satisfaction of winning in court, the judge decided after court and would mail me his decision. I got the decision in the mail like 2 days later. Cost me nothing.
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W3LK
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« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2011, 06:56:30 AM »

I'm still looking for the story, but I believe that wasn't the one.  The one I remember is a ham being stopped in the afternoon, by a LOCAL police officer--a fairly new officer.  The officer saw the radio and believed it was a scanner, and even though the ham told him otherwise and showed him his amateur license, the cop wouldn't accept it at all.  The radio--even though it was a ham radio and would not receive out of band (not programmed for it) was confiscated under the scanner law.  

Again, if I remember correctly, the judge chewed the cop out simply because 1. The radio was not a scanner, and 2. The ham had his license and showed it to the officer.  (The cop admitted that.)  The judge even had notice sent to the police department that employed that officer, admonishing them to train their officers better.

Yea, two different stories and two different scenarios it seems, Chris. The story I was referring to was very hot news on QRZ.com a few years ago.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 06:59:34 AM by W3LK » Logged

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