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Author Topic: Can I Bond Directly to the AC Panel Ground Bus  (Read 6863 times)
K1CJS
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« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2011, 12:54:02 PM »

Yes, you can and should run a thirty five foot ground wire from the SPG to your bulkhead connector, but I would STRONGLY advise you to put a ground rod through the asphalt at the point where the bulkhead connector panel can be connected to it.  You can rent a hammer drill and a suitable drill bit to get through the asphalt, or you can simply 'muscle' the rod through the asphalt with a sledge hammer.

The point of that ground rod being there is to dissipate any charges that may come down the co-ax cables before they get into your shack or house.

The point of bonding the two ground rods together is to eliminate the possibility of a voltage difference between the electrical system ground and the shack ground.  If you don't do that, you could find YOURSELF becoming the 'bond' between the two ground rods if you accidentally touch your power supply or another electrical device and your rig at the same time.  In other words, you may electrocute yourself.
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KB1VCZ
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« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2011, 01:07:15 PM »

Yes, you can and should run a thirty five foot ground wire from the SPG to your bulkhead connector, but I would STRONGLY advise you to put a ground rod through the asphalt at the point where the bulkhead connector panel can be connected to it.  You can rent a hammer drill and a suitable drill bit to get through the asphalt, or you can simply 'muscle' the rod through the asphalt with a sledge hammer.

The point of that ground rod being there is to dissipate any charges that may come down the co-ax cables before they get into your shack or house.

The point of bonding the two ground rods together is to eliminate the possibility of a voltage difference between the electrical system ground and the shack ground.  If you don't do that, you could find YOURSELF becoming the 'bond' between the two ground rods if you accidentally touch your power supply or another electrical device and your rig at the same time.  In other words, you may electrocute yourself.

Ok, that was what I thought. I have a very large rotary hammer drill so going into asphlat won't be a problem. But again, I can't directly bond that rod to the AC ground rod, I can only run the 35 ft cable back to the SPG, which in turn is connected to the AC ground system.

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KB1VCZ
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« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2011, 01:40:07 PM »

Well, this is what I have mapped out for my SPG ground system:

http://tinypic.com/r/e84rav/7

Whether I need that station ground rod I guess is debatable. It doesn't appear that it would help at dissipating energy prior to it entering the house in the event of a strike, but it would be another ground rod in the system, and I wouldn't have to go through asphalt!

Any feedback on my proposed setup would be helpful!


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K1CJS
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« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2011, 04:59:51 AM »

Ok, that was what I thought. I have a very large rotary hammer drill so going into asphlat won't be a problem. But again, I can't directly bond that rod to the AC ground rod, I can only run the 35 ft cable back to the SPG, which in turn is connected to the AC ground system.

That is fine.  The point is to connect the two ground rods together, which you will do by connecting to the SPG.  You don't have to connect the shack ground rod directly to the AC ground rod.  You just have to make sure they're connected together--even through a single point ground.

I did look at your diagram.  No, you do not 'need' the station ground rod.  If there was an easy way to do it, I would suggest putting that ground rod at the other side of the house, where the co-ax enters the building, about 16 feet away from the first ground rod there.  However, I do remember you saying that that area was asphalt covered, and it would be hard--if not impossible--to run a cable between those two ground rods.

All in all, being in a area where lightning isn't really a problem, you can get by fine with the ground at the co-ax entry point, the SPG for your shack, and the AC mains ground rod. 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2011, 05:09:21 AM by K1CJS » Logged
KB1VCZ
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« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2011, 07:32:13 AM »

Well Chris I just want to say thanks for helping me out with this.

Your comments have been very helpful indeed.

We do get some nasty storms here in the summer occasionally, so I will at a minimum install a coax ground rod where my coax comes into the house.
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K9KJM
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« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2011, 09:45:54 PM »

Looking at your diagram, If this were my station, I would consider what you call the "bulkhead" ground panel to be my "Single Point" Ground (Where any lightning arrestors, etc would go) And I would NOT have the ground wires from each piece of equipment going out to any ground!   I do not want lightning surge energy trying to get to ground THROUGH my equipment.
Most diagrams showing each piece of equipment grounded was from the 1950's, Long before the 3rd prong safety ground type outlets were installed in homes. That was a different era.

At only about 10 bucks each for nice heavy copperclad ground rods, I would also not be afraid to add at least one more in your bonding wire path........
(Your ground rod labeled "coax ground rod" should also be bonded with any ground rods that you should have at the tower or mast for the antennas, Unless you are using something like a wire dipole with no type of ground near it.)
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K1CJS
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« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2011, 04:33:25 AM »

Good luck with your station, Jeremy.  73!
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