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Author Topic: TheAntennaFarm.com they any good for MARS/CAP mod?  (Read 10577 times)
KA5IPF
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« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2011, 10:49:43 AM »

FWIW the chinese Wouxun I have states it complies with Part 90.

Clif
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W3LK
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Posts: 5639




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« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2011, 11:56:14 AM »

FWIW the chinese Wouxun I have states it complies with Part 90.

Clif

Complies with and being certified for are not necessarily the same thing. While amateur equipment does not have to be certified, part 90 radios do. Absent a certification number on the Wouxun, I wouldn't bet on it being certified.
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KA5IPF
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« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2011, 07:10:16 PM »

Try Model: KG-UVD1P FCC ID: WVTWOUXUN04 and see what happens. That's the ID on it.

Transmits from 136-174 400-470 out of the box?Huh

Clif
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W0FM
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Posts: 2056




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« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2011, 02:10:53 PM »

... my MARS application is in process plus the fact that I already very actively volunteer with a government based emergency response origination (King County Public Health Medical Reserve Corps)

I'm sure that had you dropped those names to the folks at TheAntennaFarm.com they would have dropped everything to get your radio back to you fast so you could run play Emergency Responder.   Huh

I can't speak for King County but we don't need admitted lawbreakers posing as EMCOMM personnel here in this county.

Terry, WØFM
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MAGNUM257
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Posts: 159




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« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2011, 06:12:30 PM »

If you're affiliated with a group that expects you to use a radio, it's up to THEM to provide you with a radio certificated for that particular use, and it's up to you to use THAT radio when working with that group.

Certificated?  Sounds like a Bushism... Grin
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AC5UP
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Posts: 3899




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« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2011, 07:53:30 PM »

I apologize in advance for posting this as only a world-class schmuck would notice it... But...

The call KF7OCD is trying to validate their intent to use a non type accepted radio on a commercial allocation 'cuz they volunteer for the King County Public Health Medical Reserve Corps. As if the FCC offers technical waivers for volunteers and other good-hearted folks like the local PD allows drug abuse hotline volunteers to run red lights.

Do a Google and see what OCD means to a health professional.

Ironic, ain't it?
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6045




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« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2011, 05:51:59 AM »

There is nothing wrong with "opening up" a radio as long as it is NOT used to transmit out of the ham bands.  In other words, for purposes of reception only.
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N8YX
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Posts: 118




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« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2011, 07:18:49 AM »

There is nothing wrong with "opening up" a radio as long as it is NOT used to transmit out of the ham bands.  In other words, for purposes of reception only.
Since the TH6-FA already offers "wideband" receiver coverage -

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/ht/0066spec.html

I'd say that point is somewhat moot...
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W3LK
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« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2011, 12:08:01 PM »

The OP hasn't been back in almost three weeks. Maybe he got the hint - but probably not.
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
AB9NZ
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Posts: 177




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« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2011, 07:18:29 PM »

If they ever make CW operation legal on 60 meters I'll be cutting a diode on my Icom 718. Best of 73 de Tom AB9NZ http://radiotelegrapher.posterous.com/
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KF7OCD
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2011, 01:43:08 PM »

Thank you for all your comments! I am now 100% legal! I have NEVER transmitted outside the ham bands and I am unable to do so.

Thanks for giving me a heads up on everything!
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KF7OCD
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #26 on: July 18, 2011, 01:51:18 PM »

I am new to all this and did not know what was legal and what was not. I am glad I posted here and even though some of your comments were a bit rough I now know what is ok and what is not.

So this part 90 thing? I am confused. It is ok to have an unlocked radio as long as you don't transmit outside the ham bands? Please explain this...


73's
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W3LK
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Posts: 5639




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« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2011, 03:10:08 PM »

It is ok to have an unlocked radio as long as you don't transmit outside the ham bands? Please explain this...

73's

It's rather simple; you can LISTEN to anything you want (except cell phone frequencies). There is no license required in the US to listen.
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
KF7OCD
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #28 on: July 18, 2011, 03:35:02 PM »

I am not trying to get my license suspended or worse. I really appreciate the comments and I am sorry for seeming unintelligent/ignorant. I got rid of the Kenwood radio and had my Wouxun radio set up now to ONLY TX in the ham bands.

When I first got into ham radio a guy told me that if I am emergency volunteer I can have an unlocked radio that TX's outside the ham bands, that is why I was confused but y'all on here setting me straight was a big favor. THANK YOU!!!

« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 04:13:30 PM by KF7OCD » Logged
AA4HA
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Posts: 1493




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« Reply #29 on: July 18, 2011, 05:14:19 PM »

FCC "type certification" (certificated is actually a proper word) can vary by the different relevant radio services involved. For example, a maritime VHF radio has to possess the capability of monitoring on VHF channel 16 (distress). Other radio services have different criteria used in their certification process.

99% of all of the amateur radio equipment out there does not meet the criteria for MARS operation. Occupied bandwidth and frequency stability are different for MARS operations. There is a qualified equipment list "out there" and trust me, it is quite short.

Some services require that the equipment not be capable of operating on different frequencies. Others have restrictions on transmitter power that are also rigidly tied to the inability for the antenna to be changed (FRS, GMRS).

Many amateurs believe that our because some of our equipment "can" be modified to operate on a wider spectrum than currently allocated by the FCC for amateur services that we foolish for not doing so. Some will make claims about "the by any means" clause for reporting an emergency gives us carte blanche to jump on any frequency.

Trust me, 9 times out of 10 you will end up accidentally transmitting on the wrong frequency because you fat fingered in something like 155.475 MHz (NLEEF) instead of 154.475. I own a large amount of ex-military/ government issue gear that has "open" capabilities from 1.6 to 30 MHz and it requires more caution to make sure that I am legitimately within an amateur radio band. (I read those frequency displays 2-3 times instead of just once). Having the transmitter frequency blocks are "a good thing" and helps keep us in our allocated space.

With more public service/ safety agencies moving over to trunked systems there are far fewer operators on the conventional, analog based frequencies. In many areas of the country it has also become a matter of economics as they secure new FCC licenses, sign up for regional dispatch services, move to digital, etc... It just becomes unsustainable to keep the old gear in the cars and trucks, even if they maintained the old licenses.

Even in our county (rural and in Alabama) the county and city agencies are all moving over to 800 MHz digital... all encrypted... even the public works trucks. It really simplifies on equipment standardization and bulk purchases of new gear.

Do yourself a favor, join a local ARES/ RACES group, pay the dues, help by participating in the local radio networks, take the ECom classes and take the test. You will be of much more help in an emergency/ disaster if you can operate effectively as a relay station, net control or weather spotter.

Tisha Hayes
AA4HA
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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