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Author Topic: Why do you Ham?  (Read 3956 times)
NE5C
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« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2011, 01:47:34 AM »

I ham because I really enjoy chasing DX
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K1CJS
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« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2011, 05:14:59 AM »

Because I have FUN while I play radio....

Now,  THAT  says it all.
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N2EY
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« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2011, 06:28:17 AM »

Why do people go fishing when they could just go to a store and buy fish?
Why do people drive 200 MPH race cars when they could travel on a 500 MPH jet?
Why do people sail boats across the ocean when they could just hop on a plane and get to their destination much more quickly?
Why do people go camping when they could stay in a nice hotel room?
Why do people hike across the country when they could travel in a car?
Why do people run marathons when there is any manner of transportation that could traverse 26.2 miles much more quickly?

The common thread in all of these things is that there is an inherent enjoyment in the activity itself.  Yes, there may be a better way to get to the end result but in general those 'better ways' are boring (going to the store to buy fish is certainly no fun). 

WELL SAID! I think the same way. Here are some more examples:

Why learn to play a musical instrument when there is such an enormous selection of recorded music played by experts?

Why paint, draw or sketch when there are cameras?

Why do crafts - woodworking, for example - when you can buy something similar, made by professionals?

Why do people garden when they can buy flowers and vegetables?

The common thread in all of the above is that each one is more about the journey rather than the destination. The means are as important, or even more important, than the end.

If someone just wants to get from, say, New York to LAX, the quickest and cheapest way is usually a commercial airliner. Particularly if they have advance notice and can shop around for a low fare.  Most people would do that, and then say "I flew from NY to LAX".

Now imagine actually flying a small plane from NY to LAX - as the pilot. Say a single-engine 4 seat prop plane. Would probably cost more and take a lot more time than riding an airliner, but the experience would be very different too. And when you said "I flew from NY to LAX" those words would have a very different meaning.

Amateur radio today is about "radio for its own sake". I can email somebody in Australia for free, and call someone there for almost nothing. But it's just not the same as working a VK on 40 CW with a homebrew rig and a wire antenna.

Most people don't understand the concept until you find something they do which fits the above list.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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AE4RV
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« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2011, 06:42:29 AM »

Bravo, Jim.
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AB2RC
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« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2011, 10:56:43 AM »

and found myself walking down a street in Boston and went by a Radio Shack store.  I stopped, went in and looked at all of this very impressive electronic gear.  The clerk was very helpful......


and then said

I found that it would be necessary for me to drive over a hundred miles to the closest city, a place full of crazy people who never learned to drive,

One of the reasons I moved out of Boston in the first place....

Just kidding, I love the city, but moved out when the "big dig" started.

--
Alex/AB2RC



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NO2A
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« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2011, 08:01:45 PM »

When I had my first Drake TR-4CW I used to love to watch the tubes glowing in the dark. Near the middle of the radio set the OA2 voltage regulater. The tube glowed a cool purple color. Always thought that was so neat,unlike the other orange tubes! Try explaining that to the modern cell phone crowd!............................................ Wink
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K8AXW
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« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2011, 10:13:28 PM »

2RC:  I was in Boston in 1954.... 18 years old, in the Army, full of beans but smart enough to know that there was no way I could drive a car in that town! 

And, this was also when Radio Shack was THE place where hams went!  Radio Shack sure has changed but I doubt of the drivers in Boston have!  ;-)
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K0RS
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« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2011, 08:38:14 PM »

To talk to Bumphuque, Egypt on CW.

If I can do it on 20m, fine.  If I get lucky and can do it on 80m, so much the better.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2011, 12:58:56 PM »

2RC:  I was in Boston in 1954.... 18 years old, in the Army, full of beans but smart enough to know that there was no way I could drive a car in that town! 

And, this was also when Radio Shack was THE place where hams went!  Radio Shack sure has changed but I doubt of the drivers in Boston have!  ;-)

You are quite right--in fact most have gotten worse!   Shocked
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N0ZNA
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« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2011, 07:20:47 PM »

Family tradition.And also live in Missouri...ice storms,tornados.We have been without phone,cell phone also for over a week.And we have the New Madrid fault.Cell phone are useless durring times like that.All you need is a wire and radio...73s de n0zna/John W
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TKENDALL
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« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2011, 08:32:03 PM »

Great points and very well said by Jim/N2EY. I feel the same way. It really is a shame that many younger people don't see the magic in radio, but times have changed.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2011, 10:08:06 AM »

Great points and very well said by Jim/N2EY. I feel the same way. It really is a shame that many younger people don't see the magic in radio, but times have changed.

You're quite correct.  It has been my observation(s) that the young of today have very little imagination.  They have become almost totally "visual."

I believe that to become a ham one has to "imagine" what it's like or want to put equipment together, build or assemble an antenna and make sure it's working properlay....."imagine" what it's like to set in front of said equipment and not know who you you're going to find to talk to or where in the world he/she might be. 

And, in order to do all of this, one must study for and pass one or more examinations to get a federal license to do it!

In retrospect, they way things are for us now, with HD TV that has multifunction abilities, controlled by a hand held remote control, iPad, iPhones, cell phones that have mind blowing capabilities, computers that allows one to email, read newspapers from anywhere in the world, and this list goes on and on.... it isn't any wonder that the youth of today has no interest in things that require them to 'think.'

Back in the day, kids who got involved in ham radio were a special breed of kid.  In this day and age, a kid that wants to get into ham radio isn't only a special breed of kid, but also unique !
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AE4RV
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« Reply #27 on: June 15, 2011, 10:16:34 AM »

There are more modern and plentiful outlets for the "technically creative" types these days. And then the fact that shortwave radio has long lost its relevance. I am just old enough to remember a time when a shortwave receiver was the most interesting thing that I owned as a kid. I got a computer not long after but always had a soft spot for HF. It comes and goes but right now it's particularly strong. Currently I most enjoy chasing CW DX and sprints/contests.

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K1CJS
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« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2011, 12:19:26 PM »

....In retrospect, they way things are for us now, with HD TV that has multifunction abilities, controlled by a hand held remote control, iPad, iPhones, cell phones that have mind blowing capabilities, computers that allows one to email, read newspapers from anywhere in the world, and this list goes on and on.... it isn't any wonder that the youth of today has no interest in things that require them to 'think.'

Back in the day, kids who got involved in ham radio were a special breed of kid.  In this day and age, a kid that wants to get into ham radio isn't only a special breed of kid, but also unique !

Todays kids are brought up to think that everything is available just by pushing a few buttons.  Back before the advent of the home computer and the internet, to find things out, one had to actually go to a library and look things up.  Kids back then were used to sitting down and getting their information by actually studying!  Imagine that!

Today, the way schools are going, there is no studying to be done anymore.  Homework--which used to demand that kids study, is thought to be too old and cumbersom by today's teachers--partially because of the requirements and set ideals that the government has thrown into education today.  "No child left behind" and the other government programs, standardized, rigid testing requirements that are now in place to supposedly 'assure' that education is consistent and exact, and other nonsensical programs and requirements have reduced schooling to a point that teachers are teaching students to pass certain tests, and are not teaching what would actually be required to survive in tomorrow's world.

That 'rote' teaching started back when the parents of today were in school--and look what it's gotten us!  Kids that think a term paper is something that just has to be copied from information on the web, homework that doesn't demand studying--but just a repeat of exercises or the answering of questions taught that day, simply reviewing what is needed to pass a standardized test regiment--and no thought given to what the student will actually need to learn to function in the world of tomorrow!

Then people go ahead and question why a hobby like ham radio is not attracting the kids, the kids that are taught that they only need to look at a computer screen to function, and therefore have no need--or desire--to study to enrich their knowledge or their lives?

We, as a society, must accept that we reap what we sow--and what we've sown isn't the thirst for knowledge, but the wonder of instant gratification when searching for facts.  No wonder why kids see this hobby as an old fashioned one!
« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 12:22:03 PM by K1CJS » Logged
AE6ZW
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« Reply #29 on: June 17, 2011, 02:40:13 PM »

born in 1968,  I started to listening shortwave radio around 1980.  at that time only way to listen to foreign broadcast was shortwave radio.  and I enjoyed phone patch, mobile FM,  it was very useful when we go to Mall or Travel in group to keep in touch of each others.   I see most of the practical purpose for HAM radio are gone now.  now, it is just hobby, I use slow speed CW to see who I can talk to.  and on 2 mtr FM it is good place to make new friends.  I still use 2 mtr hand held to communicate when we go to shopping.   I compare HAM RADIO to those people who ride horses,  once it was good method of transportation, but , now it is recreation and hobby.
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