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Author Topic: Music and CW  (Read 13843 times)
KF7LCE
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2011, 08:49:27 PM »

How about YYZ by Rush? The intro is in Morse Code!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nmOMo4OPi4
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KC6ZBE
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Posts: 47




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« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2011, 09:30:21 PM »

Dont forget Roger Waters album "Radio K.A.O.S." is chalk full of code......

Not a musician but I love music....Brother took up the guitar really well....I took up CW....We both learned our "tools" at a young age, though....

Dave
KC6ZBE
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 993




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« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2011, 12:35:02 PM »

got my ham license the same year I started playing clarinet and sax, and still active with all 3. Started as a Novice with CW, still enjoy it. Have played various sizes clarinet and sax in swing bands, pit orchestra, quartets, and concert bands. Currently with www.placentiaband.org
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KM6CQ
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2011, 04:42:53 PM »

I find that CW is similar to bluegrass. A lot of tunes run around 180 BPM's which is like sending code.
I think playing helps my code sending and sending helps my playing. Here are a couple reasons for this.
First, God has blessed us with bluegrass music strait from heaven. CW op's and Bluegrass musicians are part of the chosen few. (well it sounds good)
Secondly, sending perfectly timed characters and spacing is much like playing very quickly.
This requires muscle memory in your fingers, agility, dexterity and the many strange demands we put on our fingers to form unnatural positions and movements,
and the feel of the timing are part of the same skill set needed to do both.
Also there is the practicing it takes to accomplish these task. If you can play a song 500 times perfectly then you can say you have mastered that song.
If you can perform 500 flawless CW QSO's you could say you have mastered CW as well.
CW and Music also share this concept. Perfect practice makes perfect CW, music.
There is continual learning and improvement for both. We are all at a given level and can get better at it. You get out of it what you put into it.
Just as no one is tone deaf, (every one of you can hear the difference between 600 and 700 Hz) no one is without talent for CW and music. We all have a different degree of it within us. Hard work will take you a lot farther then some who appears to be gifted and does not work hard at it. We can all drive, but not all of us can run a 1.5 mile oval track at over 200 mph. I think those boys practice every chance they get right up to their gig (race day)
There are some phrases I have to play hundreds and hundreds of times to play them correctly. (I have a patient xyl)
There are times when accomplishing a higher code speed requires months of immersion.  Training is hard work and deeply satisfying when completed
I wish it came easy for me and I could play and operate CW like those who inspire me. There is just no substitute for hard work and experience.
 

So there are some of my thoughts on the subject and I am sure many of you have a lot more.
May God bless our great hobby and music. And thanks to him for his generosity for sharing and equipping us for it.

73,  Dan  KM6CQ

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AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2011, 11:11:24 PM »

I haven't an ear for music or playing instruments.  Actually, I'm slightly hard of hearing in one ear, which makes CW even more challenging.  I have trouble enough understanding what some people say.  I press on for the reasons you state, however.

Something I forgot to mention explicitly that I think is crucial when learning Morse... Musicians learn to immediately "let go" of mistakes.  If you play a wrong note, you don't make a face, dwell on it, think about what you did wrong -- you immediately "let go" and continue with the performance.  When learning to copy Morse, you need to do the same thing.  If you miss a letter or word, "let it go" and concentrate on the next one.  If you think about it past errors, you'll miss what's coming next, and that will snowball into frustration.

This is not a natural procedure for most people.  It takes practice.

This, not sending and receiving, was the worst hurdle for me to overcome when I was starting out.  Heck, even today I'm very self-conscious about my sending.  I don't want to get on the air until it's "perfect".  I even used a CW keyboard for a while, because I didn't want to risk poorly formed characters.  Well, there is no perfection in life.  CW is a humbling avocation.  It's better to spend a good amount of time with the paddles rather than obsess about whether one is "doing it right" or not.

I'll freely admit that I'm a bit liddish.  I still tend to get nervous at the key and send a few extra dits and dahs here and there, etc.  I also get the "snowball effect" on the air, as I lose focus, obsess on what I've done wrong, and then keep tripping over myself. I must remember that most hams are tolerant and willing to help.  

73, Jordan
« Last Edit: September 03, 2011, 11:13:15 PM by AB2T » Logged
KM6CQ
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #35 on: September 05, 2011, 09:18:17 AM »

When you are performing on stage, one thing you do is become the greatest actor. When you make mistake you move on like it never happened, no face, no smile. You keep going. Same with CW, the other guy will know you made a mistake just like musicians who are listening. But most likely he will not really care and want you to move on as well.
Every one else thinks you did well except you. You need to disregard the information for the moment. Then revisit it when you are off the air.
When I make a mistake sending, very seldom do I send a string of dits signalling it. I just move on. The other station always knows what is going on and copy's FB
It's just a fun mode to be enjoyed and not a test.

73,   Dan
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K8AXW
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Posts: 4001




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« Reply #36 on: September 05, 2011, 09:31:58 AM »

When I make a mistake sending, very seldom do I send a string of dits signalling it. I just move on. The other station always knows what is going on and copy's FB
It's just a fun mode to be enjoyed and not a test.

73,   Dan


When I make a mistake I send a double "I".... di-dit, di-dit.  Other sends a string of "E"s. Whatever.  No big deal.

With my old arthritic hands my mistakes are becoming more frequent.  As noted in the quote above, "the other station knows what is going on", "it's just fun" and it's not a test.

If you become obsessive-compulsive with sending CW, it's no longer FUN.  FUN is the name of the game.

When things get too bad, either too many mistakes or painful, I'll switch to a keyboard keyer.  Life moves on.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2835




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« Reply #37 on: September 05, 2011, 09:49:46 AM »

The only time I ever used the "error" on the ham bands signal was in my early Novice days in late 1959.

The Navy REQUIRED you to use it if you made a mistake, and if you didn't catch it in a plain-language message, the operator on the other end would "break" you and ask for a repeat.  The "error" signal was eight E's.  Not seven.  Not nine.  And not just a string of dits on the bug.  Individual E's. Eight of them.  And with the Security Group on board monitoring and waiting to record grievous procedural mistakes, we knew better than to try shortcuts like only seven E's.

Today on the ham bands, I agree with the "didit didit", or "VE" (didididahdit) if you need to point out an error, such as an address or phone number.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KM6CQ
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #38 on: September 05, 2011, 10:01:06 AM »

I think your right Pat. Interesting enough, I find that once in a while I get nervous still. Because missed something or sent something wrong.
I guess it is in our nature to always want to be our best.

73,    Dan
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N5MAV
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #39 on: September 30, 2011, 10:38:32 AM »

AK7V is right on the money!  I'm a bass guitarist and the last three years of my part-time career have been the most intense.  With more stage and studio time than I've ever experienced, I'm seeing new things happen.  I'm EXTREMELY visual and memorized scales and chords by pattern.  With more playing I'm better able to hear pitch and tone and my playing has stepped up.  My practice sessions are short and focused when learning new pieces.  I stay sharp on the set list by listening while driving, etc.

Got any You Tube clips up of ur playing we can view?

My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.
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W6REH
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #40 on: September 30, 2011, 08:27:28 PM »


My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.
[/quote]

Nice. Brings back memories.
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N4IAG
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Posts: 49




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« Reply #41 on: October 01, 2011, 09:42:57 AM »

My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.

That's some good stuff! I like very much. Thanks for the link. Smiley

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I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
K9FV
Member

Posts: 480




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« Reply #42 on: October 01, 2011, 03:38:45 PM »

I can't carry a tune in a dump truck. But I love cw and I have had many compliments on my fist, both bug and straight key. Go figure. 73 de wb6ubk

There are two aspects to musical talent - tone/hearing and rhythm.  It's the rhythm that's so important to CW.  Most musicians have both....  I have neither:(

Good thread - and confirms what I've felt for many years.

73 de Ken H>
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KB9TME
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #43 on: October 04, 2011, 04:31:18 PM »

I can't find the article at the moment but I remember reading about research that showed people's brains are structured differently depending on the skills they practice.  A video gamer's brain had enlarged areas dealing with hand eye coordination and reflex,

If you play music your brain has already changed with specialization for detecting tone, rhythm, and sequence.  That's why it's easier for someone who plays music to pick up CW.

If you're learning and can't get it consider that your brain has to shift gears and enlarge areas dealing with recognition, pattern, and coordination to work CW.

The human brain is amazing in how it can adapt.  You just have to give it time to and eventually you'll get it.
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