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Author Topic: Pictures of Shelves in Shacks  (Read 10145 times)
KD4LLA
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Posts: 454




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« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2011, 01:58:23 PM »

Here is a picture of what I am planning to build.  Looking at the way the two boards come together to form a corner, and if I wanted to countersink the screws with a special bit, what is the best way to drill through both boards at once?

http://i51.tinypic.com/a5ixrs.png

I've decided to use a 1x12 Quality Pine or White wood board which is surfaced on four sides and ready to use.  I talked with someone at Johnson's Workbench locally and they are recommending I use a #6 x 1-1/2" wood screw with glue to make sure the joints are as strong as possible.  I personally feel that if I use (4) screws at each intersection, the joint will be plenty strong without using the glue too.  What does everyone else think?

Oh, I almost forgot, the monitor will sit on the right with the radio, tuner, keyer, etc on the left.

Thanks for everyone's input,
Chris
I quit using wood screws about twenty years ago.  Nothing but 2" drywall screws used here, and glue.  When I revamp my radio setup (seems every four years or so), I buy a sheet of 3/4" plywood and cut whatever size of shelf I need at the time.  Solid wood is (#2 pine) is too costly and I never seem to get a straight piece.  Any lumberyard worth their salt can rip a plywood sheet to whatever size you want for a dollar or so.

Mike
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W2EM
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2011, 07:54:34 PM »

A good material to use is 5/4 pine step treads.  Loews or Home Depot have them in 4' lengths, all sanded and the front edge is already rounded bullnose.  That's what I used in my pictures.
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K1ZJH
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Posts: 949




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« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2011, 05:16:29 PM »


Second the stair treads, and I thought I had a secret weapon, LOL!

I'm using 1"x11.5"x48" bullnose stair tread unfinished pine board from
the local Home Depot for shelves. Lowes has the same product.
I extended the shelf width to 15" using a Porter Cable biscuit joiner. The
boards are about $7.95 each. Wood is imported from China, and
requires a bit of sanding to make it anything near furniture grade.

This is a work in progress:

http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o46/radioconnection/DSCF1142.jpg

Everything is rabbeted, dowelled, or bisquit joined. No nails or screws.

If you are going to build as shown, I'd use a bisquit joiner.

Pete
« Last Edit: October 10, 2011, 05:21:58 PM by K1ZJH » Logged
K1ZJH
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Posts: 949




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« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2011, 07:42:35 AM »

Here is a picture of what I am planning to build.  Looking at the way the two boards come together to form a corner, and if I wanted to countersink the screws with a special bit, what is the best way to drill through both boards at once?

http://i51.tinypic.com/a5ixrs.png

 Thanks for everyone's input,
Chris

I wanted to mention you are making the weakest possible joints as shown. I'd rabbet join those shelves, and I'd have
the top shelves extending over the vertical supports, not flush to the sides. Glue alone will not hold that together,
or prevent racking motion side to side.  I'd still suggest using a biscuit joiner, wood dowels, or if you have to,
long screws. You can buy a counter sink drill bit to recess the heads at any hardware store. Clamp the boards as
they will be assembled, and drill.

I tried gluing and clamping the rabbets on the shelves shown above. The first sharp blow broke all the glue
bonds. I ended up using dowels. And I will be bracing the back before they go into use.

Pete
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VE3FMC
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Posts: 986


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« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2011, 01:05:07 PM »

A good material to use is 5/4 pine step treads.  Loews or Home Depot have them in 4' lengths, all sanded and the front edge is already rounded bullnose.  That's what I used in my pictures.

Thanks for the tip Charles. I am planning on rebuilding my operating desk and those stair treads look nice!
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