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Author Topic: Copying CW with earphones  (Read 971 times)
K7KCS
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Posts: 27




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« on: September 16, 2002, 02:45:19 PM »

Hello all,

I have unequal hearing, much better in one ear.  I use earphones and the result is unbalanced volume.  I am looking for an elegant solution to taking the mono earphone output from my transceiver, splitting it and putting some kind of "balance" device in the circuit to adjust the loudness in the bad ear or reduce the loudness in the good ear.  Of course I would be using stereo earphones. Any ideas?

73's  Tracy K7KCS
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KC0IOX
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2002, 12:21:56 AM »

Something I've tried which may work for you is to use your computer if you have one in the shack.  On my Icom 718, there is a auxilliary output jack for an external speaker.  I've run a mono patch cord from the rig to the soundcard input on my computer, and then used the computer speakers.  I have a set of speakers that has a jack for phones.  The computer lets me adjust the balance of the sound.  Your situation may be a lot different than mine, but that has worked for me.  Just a suggestion, and perhaps it will help.
73
Eric
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K0RS
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Posts: 785




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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2002, 09:41:29 PM »

I know it's not always easy just to run out and buy a new radio, but you might want to consider one of the newer models with stereo phone jacks.  My Yaesu FT-1000mp was configurable thru the menu to use the sub-receiver's volume control as a balance control for the main receiver.  Something to consider when it comes time to replace the rig with a newer model....
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2002, 12:12:34 PM »

I think this is an underrated problem.  My ears are fried from playing guitar in rock bands for many years, and while those days are gone, the high frequency hearing loss remains.  I would play around with as many different kinds of headphones as you can find.  I borrowed a pair from my son that wrap arond from behind, and at first I thought they were absolutely silly, but they work great.  I am left eared ( don't laugh ), and most of the time I am doing CW and watching TV in the shack, so I have the right ear uncovered to hear the TV and it works pretty well.  One thing that helps me is the increased adjustment of audio I have from using outboard analog and digital DSP on my radios, even my FT-1000MP, and Omni VI+. If you have trouble hearing, anything you can do to give you more audio flexibility is worth doing as long as you don't degrade the signal. Believe it or not, there are several Honor Roll members who use outboard audio units rather than the DSP on their MP's, Pro II's, 765's, and 781's.  Nothing is perfect, but you would be really surprised what some of these devices can do.  Sometimes I just use these devices to tailor the audio I hear in my headphone to make it more pleasing, not because I cannot hear the signal, although when needed, they help with this also. I gotta admit, the stereo recieve on the MP is super.  Boy, I wish I could afford an Orion!
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K0RS
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Posts: 785




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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2002, 01:52:24 AM »

Many radios provide a low level audio output somewhere on the rear apron.  The FT-1000mp had a minature phono plug for this.  I think Kenwood models have this feature in the accessory DIN plugs.  You can bring your audio out there and run it thru an outboard stereo amp.  That way you can not only use the amp's balance control, but tailor the bass and treble to suit you.  One could even incorporate a graphic equalizer to compensate for frequency related hearing loss.  Normally the low level outpit is independant of the rig's volume control, so volume has to be controlled at the amp.  A simple "Y" connector gets monoaural audio into both of the amp's input channels.
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N8IK
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Posts: 64


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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2002, 03:12:50 PM »

MFJ sells headphones with individual volume controls on each ear cup.  They work fb and were $20 new at a hamfest.
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