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Author Topic: CW- word spacing  (Read 1667 times)
KG4VBR
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2002, 07:49:32 PM »

I used the intro to morse code.Don't know about the others but i'm sure there all good if from arrl
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W4YA
Member

Posts: 317




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« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2002, 06:36:29 AM »

Jackie
You are confusing two terms. The test is given at 5 WPM. That is, in one minute, 5 words will be sent. But each letter will be sent at the rate of 13 WPM.  Still in one minute, 5 words will be sent. Believe me, this is a good thing.

In my opinion the G4FON program is the best CW trainer you could use. Stick with it.
73 - Jim W4YA
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K4NR
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Posts: 32


WWW

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« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2002, 09:28:11 AM »

Unless it has changed, the letters are sent at 13 WPM with longer spacing to get the speed down to 5 WPM.

As for on-the-air spacing I too have ran across the "guy" who runs everything together.  They are sending letters at 13 WPM and tightening up the spaces trying to get the speed up.  I hate working that kind of operator.

I heard a station in a pile-up on the 3X last night.  The 3X was split running at 30+ and this station is on top of the DX calling at 7 to 10 WPM.  The DX worked two stations before this guy sent his call. Of course all the DX Police are sending LID and UP UP at 30+ WPM. What a mess that was...

73 de Tom, K4NR

 
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N8UZE
Member

Posts: 1524




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« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2002, 05:31:21 PM »

Over the years, it has been found that people actually copy code better if the individual letters are sent at a speed equivalent to higher speed code but with larger spaces between the letters and words.  The 5 wpm test has exactly the same number of characters (letters, numbers, etc) sent in one minute no matter what the speed of the individual characters is.  At 5 wpm, in one minute's worth you will get 25 characters.  Letters count as one character. Numbers and prosigns, being longer, count as two characters.

At the test, the VEs will either play a tape or run a computer program to send you code.  This runs for five minutes.  You copy the code as it is sent.  Then you answer 10 questions on the content of the message.  If you get 7 out of 10 right, you pass.  If you don't get enough questions right, the VEs will examine your copy paper and look for one minute's worth of what is called solid copy.  This means 25 characters in a row that were copied correctly (and remember, numbers and prosigns count as 2 characters each).  If they find one minute solid copy, you will pass even if you didn't get the 7 out of ten questions.

And oh yes, it is common at first to not know where one word ends and the next begins.  But even if you run it together, you can still read it and find the answer to the test questions.  I still sometimes run words together even though I'm an Extra and passed it at the time when Extras had to do 20wpm.
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N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9892




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« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2002, 07:18:08 PM »

http://www.g4fon.co.uk/    there is also a program there you can use to type in on the computer and it scores for you too.  this is the koch method. you start with 2 characters at 20 wpm, then listen and copy for 5 minutes.  when you get 90% on the two, add one letter and go again.  when you have all of the 46 numbers, prosigns and letters learned, you know code at 20 wpm, which is useful, and you can pass the 5 wpm test in your sleep..  Ray has made this a great program  73  tom N6AJR
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