Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: mastering the tunning of cw signals  (Read 588 times)
M3CMA
Member

Posts: 3


WWW

Ignore
« on: December 23, 2002, 09:01:14 PM »

Hi.

I am trying very hard to put my long hours of practice off the air into practice on the air!

Problem I have is that I do not appear to have mastered the art of setting the tx/rx for cw.

I have a perfect tunned morse signal yet when I attempt to reply to the CQ I have never managed to get a single response.

What is the trick here, should I have some form of offset configured?
Thanks
Simon.
Logged
K5CEY
Member

Posts: 217




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2002, 09:43:49 PM »

Simon, normally you would not use any kind of offset for a CW contact. Have you ever been able to make a contact with anyone with your present set up? This is where it's nice to have a local ham to check your transmitted signal.
               John  K5CEY
Logged
M3CMA
Member

Posts: 3


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2002, 07:30:11 AM »

Thanks for the reply.  My mistake.  I was putting no CW signal out at all!!  The trick is to read the instructions for the set..  

dit's and dah's are certainly now flowing freely.

Thanks
Simon
Logged
N6KB
Member

Posts: 46




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2003, 04:14:19 PM »

Simon, I am glad to hear that you found the problem and are now on the air making CW QSOs. Getting your transmitter on the right frequency is a common problem for CW operators for a couple of reasons. One reason is we may not know what frequency the other station is listening to. Even if we do know where we want our transmit signal to be, it may not be so easy to get it exactly there. Ideally the sidetone that the transceiver produces when we key it would be an exact representation of where in our receiver passband the transmit signal will be. This is not always the case either because of a design that did not consider this, misalignment, or other settings on the radio that change it such as RIT or operating split. There are a lot of things that can go wrong. If you learn how the radio works and how to get your CW TX signal right where you want it, your success at CW operating will be much greater.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!