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Author Topic: ANTENNA THAT ATTACHES TO REAR OF VHF TRANSCEIVER?  (Read 1723 times)
W3EK
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Posts: 10




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« on: August 27, 2011, 03:54:13 PM »

     I believe that at one time there was an antenna that would mount to the coax plug on the rear of a vhf transceiver, i.e. Yaesu FT2500 or 3500. This would take the place of either a mobile of base antenna. Anyone familiar with this antenna  and/ or know its manufactuer?
  Thanks Rich W3ECU
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KD0NFY
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Posts: 75




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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2011, 10:28:35 AM »

I use an antenna like that made by Larsen, the model is "PQ."  It's a VHF quarter wave with a PL-259 on the end.  You trim the whip to resonance.  I use a 259 right angle connector and connect it right to the back of the radio.  It's a quarter wave, it's low to the ground, and has no ground plane to speak of.  So it's not much of an antenna.  But during thunderstorms I can hit the local 2 meter repeater and scan public service without worrying about lightning. 

The base of it looks like this:  http://www.harrystone.net/posted/pq.jpg
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WA3UOO
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2012, 08:47:45 PM »

Such antennas should be used when there is nothing else available for an antenna. If you do end up using one of these consider using the absolute minimum power (as you should anyway) to conduct the QSO. You're sitting right next to the radiating antenna and at high power levels, you're getting too much RF exposure in all likelihood.
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2012, 06:19:31 AM »

You take a brazing rod and make a small loop on one end (so there will not be a bare sharp point to poke out and eye)
Cut the rod to and overall length of 20.5"
Insert it in to a PL-259 and solder the end flush with the tip if the center conductor of the plug (do not use the reducing adapter in the PL-259)
Fill the back of the plug with hot glue

The use of a right angle adapter to connect to the radio is optional.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1073




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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2012, 09:46:23 PM »

Used to be called a Quick Stick. Was a bottom loaded short antenna that connected directly to the SO-238. It was used mostly for CB operation, but were also made for VHF/UHF transceivers. The equivalent is the rubber Duckie used on HTs, The connector would have to be adapted with a PL-259 and the power handling capacity of the antenna would have to be observed.

73s

K2OWK
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 443




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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2012, 10:24:01 PM »

     I believe that at one time there was an antenna that would mount to the coax plug on the rear of a vhf transceiver, i.e. Yaesu FT2500 or 3500. This would take the place of either a mobile of base antenna. Anyone familiar with this antenna  and/ or know its manufactuer?
  Thanks Rich W3ECU

http://rffun.com/catalog/hamantht/0867.html

Although if Larsen made one, I'd rather have theirs Smiley
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6055




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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 04:45:54 AM »

Radio Shack also made one that could be used, it was a collapsible antenna with a coil built into it, made for scanner use.  It could be used for VHF transceivers as well--with a little common sense.  I don't know if its still available there.

The myth that you would be overexposed to RF radiation from a VHF transceiver is just that--a myth.  It is the result of an over-protective government reaction to an alarmist report of possible harmful RF radiation.  All this started after the scare that came from the use of microwave ovens in a way they were not meant to be used in.  There have been radios in vehicles used for years, some with outputs of a hundred watts, and never a report of harm from them--unless it was a report of burns from someone touching the antenna directly when the transmitter was being keyed.
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K0JEG
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Posts: 672




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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 06:00:28 PM »

Radio Shack also made one that could be used, it was a collapsible antenna with a coil built into it, made for scanner use.  It could be used for VHF transceivers as well--with a little common sense.  I don't know if its still available there.

I've used that antenna on HTs in the past, just because I didn't know better at the time. It did work provided you adjusted the length.

When I was setting up the shack after moving I tried to connect it to my FT-897d using adapters for a quick check-in on the local Sunday repeater net. When I keyed up the transmitter it completely locked up the radio (on transmit). I had to pull the power to reset it. This was with power set to 5 Watts. I then set up a 1/2 wave mobile on a shelf about 5 feet away. Same thing. Once I got my colinear set up in the attic (on the other side of the apartment) I could finally transmit without locking up the radio. so, keep in mind your desktop radio may not be able to handle having the antenna directly attached.
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KG4RUL
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Posts: 2750


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« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2012, 04:19:11 AM »

     I believe that at one time there was an antenna that would mount to the coax plug on the rear of a vhf transceiver, i.e. Yaesu FT2500 or 3500. This would take the place of either a mobile of base antenna. Anyone familiar with this antenna  and/ or know its manufactuer?
  Thanks Rich W3ECU

http://rffun.com/catalog/hamantht/0867.html

Although if Larsen made one, I'd rather have theirs Smiley

If you look closely at the text of the page, you will discover that this fine antenna comes with a special feature - a "swival"!
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