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Author Topic: Top of the DXCC Honor Roll  (Read 27763 times)
NU4B
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Posts: 2286




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« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2011, 08:28:05 PM »

So how many people are at or can get to the #1 spot on the Honor roll? I'm just (!) waiting for KP1, and there's hope that one will happen relatively soon.  There must be a lot of DXers out there who haven't got P5, are most unlikely to have a chance to get it in the forseeable future, and so have no chance to get to#1. Would it be an idea that if an entity hasn't been activated for a certain time, it should drop off the DXCC list?

I got my novice ticket in January 1990 and reached the top of the Honor Roll in August 2009 -- less than two solar cycles. How? DXLab.

It has not been usual for entities to "go dark" for significant intervals -- e.g. China, Myanmar, Albania -- and later return to the ranks of active entities.

The idea of removing entities that haven't been activated for a certain time is much worse than the typical "make it easier" proposals. So if a cold-weather DXPedition team can't raise the funds required to activate South Sandwich or Bouvet every X years, these entities should be removed from the list?

My advice is to keep yourself occupied with DXCC Challenge and/or Marathon while you're waiting for currently-inactive entities to be activated.

     73,

        Dave, AA6YQ





I agree - why would you want to be No. 1 Honor Roll after they just "cheapened" the rules? Some countries are real easy, some are real hard - that's the fun of it and what makes getting to No. 1 special.

I don't need KP1 - but there are a few others I need - OK a bunch of others. But to think I would want some of them temporarily deleted because I didn't get a chance to work them the last time they were one the air seems a bit...well... I'll just say self-serving.

I remember when my ZA1A QSL card came in. What a thrill! (of course with 5 watts Aruba is a thrill) I was jumping up and down all day.

Everybody is handicapped by the reality of life. Sometimes you just have to miss a DX"pedition. The best you can do is make your station as efficient as possible, stay active (besides what Dave mentioned there are DX contests, Islands, awards of all kinds, antenna experimentation, and on and on), and enjoy the time DX'ing (although I've recently learned that some people don't really like DX'ing, just the title) until that last one gets activiated.
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 11:04:58 PM »

"I got my novice ticket in January 1990 and reached the top of the Honor Roll in August 2009"

Hmmm..... DX cluster #1 honor roll.


Did I use SpotCollector to discern the operating patterns of needed DX stations and PropView to determine when and where to best look for them? Absolutely.

When a station I needed was spotted, did DXLab get me on frequency and on bearing while those without automation were spinning dials and twisting knobs? Absolutely.

    73,

         Dave, AA6YQ
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4718




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« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2011, 02:40:09 AM »

We chose a house good for ham radio when we moved here in 1986. Out in the country, and there's now a 4 ele Steppir at 62 feet - used to be a 205BA and 4ele interlaced for 10 and 15 above it. So having got a good QTH and so on, I then start doing a lot of travelling for work....My peak was 85 flights in a year. So of course I missed DXpeditions!

You can't beat Murphy...Now I'm part retired and contracting, but will still be away around 80 nights a year.
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NU4B
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« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2011, 04:53:06 AM »

We chose a house good for ham radio when we moved here in 1986. Out in the country, and there's now a 4 ele Steppir at 62 feet - used to be a 205BA and 4ele interlaced for 10 and 15 above it. So having got a good QTH and so on, I then start doing a lot of travelling for work....My peak was 85 flights in a year. So of course I missed DXpeditions!

You can't beat Murphy...Now I'm part retired and contracting, but will still be away around 80 nights a year.

Just what I mean - you have a great set up but not at home much. I'm at home alot, but can't have towers at this point. I doubt its ideal for most of us.

You just have to decide - do you want to work (and have an income) or do you want to be a DX'er? Smiley (Just kidding of course)

But if your just waiting for KP1, you're in much better shape than those waiting for P5.

I went back and got out my ZA1A card I talked about earlier. It was from Oct. 5th 1991 and on the back it said "The First licensed Amateur Radio Operation from Albania". How cool is that? I only had to wait 14 years - there were guys that waited for decades. And for many of them ZA was the last one. I wonder how many of them would have traded that moment of exhilaration and satisfaction when they got their No.1 DXCC plaque for a plaque you would get for working them all minus the ones that weren't currently active?

 Compare today to back then. We have it made. Its much easier to get in position to get No.1 DXCC than ever before. Much better radios, computerized everything, better and immediate access to DX information, propagation information, many more DXpeditions and Dxpeditioneers, much quicker and easier travel to rare places (not that all "entities" are easy to get to ), less danger (not that there are not dangerous places today and dangers of a different kind), LOTW, more bands, etc.., etc..., etc...
 Back when I first got my license (that was when I was walking barefoot in the snow 10 miles to get to school) it was rare that anyone from eastern Europe would go on a Dx'pedition - if at all. Just the fall of the Soviet Union had a huge impact on Dx'ing. Besides the relative ease of working some countries that were rare or in the case of ZA not on the air at all, many ops from Russia and the rest of eastern Europe now travel to all corners of the globe. The available pool of DXpeditioneers is now much bigger which means more Dxpeditions for all of us. The many technical advances and political changes over the last 20-25 years shows how DX'ing is everchanging and why staying active is the key to success. What's rare today probably won't be tomorrow. 
 Just thinking about all this has made me so happy I think I'll go work some DX.
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KY6R
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« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2011, 09:01:57 AM »

I do think the DXCC program is a great incentive to stay on the air - and for me - its a fun "game". I'm really only competing against myself - and it forces me to try to improve my station and operating skills continually. I enjoy hearing everyone's "bragging rights" - because everyone seems to have hit goals that I am still trying for.

I expect that it will take me as long to get to even "regular" DXCC let alone #1 - which will probably happen in 10 years - 3 years shy of semi-retirement.

Some entities will be added, some deleted, and the goal post will probably go back and forth a bit. But the fun, challenge, frustration and mini celebrations - when I work an all time new one will remain constant.

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G3RZP
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« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2011, 12:34:12 PM »

NU4B,

I have at least 10 days a year in Geneva at the ITU, representing amateur radio for the IARU, just to reduce my availability. Quite often, there's meetings on a Saturday or a Sunday or both, and if there isn't, you're preparing documents so there's little time to use 4U1ITU!

And a beer costs around $8......
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K1VSK
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2011, 02:28:04 PM »

We chose a house good for ham radio when we moved here in 1986. Out in the country, and there's now a 4 ele Steppir at 62 feet - used to be a 205BA and 4ele interlaced for 10 and 15 above it. So having got a good QTH and so on, I then start doing a lot of travelling for work....My peak was 85 flights in a year. So of course I missed DXpeditions!

You can't beat Murphy...Now I'm part retired and contracting, but will still be away around 80 nights a year.

 Compare today to back then. We have it made. Its much easier to get in position to get No.1 DXCC than ever before. Much better radios, computerized everything, better and immediate access to DX information, propagation information, many more DXpeditions and Dxpeditioneers, much quicker and easier travel to rare places (not that all "entities" are easy to get to ), less danger (not that there are not dangerous places today and dangers of a different kind), LOTW, more bands, etc.., etc..., etc...
 Back when I first got my license (that was when I was walking barefoot in the snow 10 miles to get to school) it was rare that anyone from eastern Europe would go on a Dx'pedition - if at all. Just the fall of the Soviet Union had a huge impact on Dx'ing. Besides the relative ease of working some countries that were rare or in the case of ZA not on the air at all, many ops from Russia and the rest of eastern Europe now travel to all corners of the globe. The available pool of DXpeditioneers is now much bigger which means more Dxpeditions for all of us. The many technical advances and political changes over the last 20-25 years shows how DX'ing is everchanging and why staying active is the key to success. What's rare today probably won't be tomorrow.  
 Just thinking about all this has made me so happy I think I'll go work some DX.

I think the revolution in electronics being a help is debatable, however, I disagree with what you said about the relative increase in Dxpedition availability now compared with the "old days". While true many folks have less travel restrictions, there is now a big void in the true Dxpedition'ers such as Danny Wiel, Gus Browning, the infamous Don Miller, etc. all of whom traveled extensively just for the purpose of putting an otherwise unavailable country on the air and with little outside assistance as well.
When I think about all the countries these handful of guys activated, there is nothing or no one to compare in contemporary life. If one only worked the YASME expeditions, they would have more and rarer counters than virtually anyone today ever activated.

It was also more fun in those days when you could actually talk to Gus or Danny instead of simply exchanging reports and getting computerized confirmation of the q.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2011, 02:29:54 PM by K1VSK » Logged
NU4B
Member

Posts: 2286




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« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2011, 04:59:11 PM »

We chose a house good for ham radio when we moved here in 1986. Out in the country, and there's now a 4 ele Steppir at 62 feet - used to be a 205BA and 4ele interlaced for 10 and 15 above it. So having got a good QTH and so on, I then start doing a lot of travelling for work....My peak was 85 flights in a year. So of course I missed DXpeditions!

You can't beat Murphy...Now I'm part retired and contracting, but will still be away around 80 nights a year.

 Compare today to back then. We have it made. Its much easier to get in position to get No.1 DXCC than ever before. Much better radios, computerized everything, better and immediate access to DX information, propagation information, many more DXpeditions and Dxpeditioneers, much quicker and easier travel to rare places (not that all "entities" are easy to get to ), less danger (not that there are not dangerous places today and dangers of a different kind), LOTW, more bands, etc.., etc..., etc...
 Back when I first got my license (that was when I was walking barefoot in the snow 10 miles to get to school) it was rare that anyone from eastern Europe would go on a Dx'pedition - if at all. Just the fall of the Soviet Union had a huge impact on Dx'ing. Besides the relative ease of working some countries that were rare or in the case of ZA not on the air at all, many ops from Russia and the rest of eastern Europe now travel to all corners of the globe. The available pool of DXpeditioneers is now much bigger which means more Dxpeditions for all of us. The many technical advances and political changes over the last 20-25 years shows how DX'ing is everchanging and why staying active is the key to success. What's rare today probably won't be tomorrow.  
 Just thinking about all this has made me so happy I think I'll go work some DX.

I think the revolution in electronics being a help is debatable, however, I disagree with what you said about the relative increase in Dxpedition availability now compared with the "old days". While true many folks have less travel restrictions, there is now a big void in the true Dxpedition'ers such as Danny Wiel, Gus Browning, the infamous Don Miller, etc. all of whom traveled extensively just for the purpose of putting an otherwise unavailable country on the air and with little outside assistance as well.
When I think about all the countries these handful of guys activated, there is nothing or no one to compare in contemporary life. If one only worked the YASME expeditions, they would have more and rarer counters than virtually anyone today ever activated.

It was also more fun in those days when you could actually talk to Gus or Danny instead of simply exchanging reports and getting computerized confirmation of the q.

 Maybe the your talking about quality (new and rare ones) versus quantity.
 I think most of those guys were before my time, but I did work the Colvins - alot. And as a newbie DX'er most of the places they went to were new ones for me, even the ones that weren't that rare.
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NU4B
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« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2011, 05:00:18 PM »

NU4B,

And a beer costs around $8......


OUCH!!!!!!!
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WD4ELG
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2011, 02:09:55 PM »

Agreed with packet clusters, the internet, etc, it does seem somewhat easier to get rare DX than when I started in 1977.  And the gear is more lightweight so it's easier to get to those rare DX locations.  Can you imagine a Collins S line at Scarborough Reef in this day and age?

I remember faithfully copying the ARRL DX bulletin on CW every week, it was like gold pouring from the sky.   But I will say that the 1958 and 1979 solar peaks were way more impressive than our current one.  2001 was pretty good, but I remember running JA and UA0 stations (calling ME and creating a pileup) in the CQ WW SSB DX contest in 1979 at 2200 local on 15 meters with simple wire antennas and 100 watts from a seaside location in central CA.  I had a rate of 70 per hour for almost three hours, and my QSO rate was limited by my hand cramps from writing the calls down and trying to check the dupe sheet!  Oh, those were the days!  Guess my Honor Roll application will need another sunspot cycle...still only at 285.  Well, hopefully the Koreas will peacefully re-unite and P5 will be deleted. 

Mark Lunday
WD4ELG
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N5UD
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« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2011, 07:38:51 PM »

"I went back and got out my ZA1A card I talked about earlier"

Yes one of my last was Albania, ZA1A. Peter I and Burma would be the others.

It seems I worked Romeo or a pirate Romeo from P5 that was not accepted. Surely some here recall Romeo ?

73 Tony N5UD
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2011, 09:04:12 PM »

Tony, as Jerry Seinfeld says...don't get me started!  Was looking at Romeo's antics on the web again last weekend.  Sounds like he's in the federal slammer for a long time into the future.

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K4JK
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Posts: 304




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« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2011, 05:09:16 AM »

Could you point some of us fledgling DX'ers towards Romeo's antics, or explain them? I love reading about DXing history.
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ex W4HFK
G3RZP
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« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2011, 05:27:46 AM »

Which ones? The credit card fraud ones for which he's in jail, or the phony DXpeditons. A Google search pulls up a lot - look for romeo stepanenko. Sometimes referred to as 'Romeo Stuffyourbucko'.

There were also questions about some dodgy arms sales in places that he went to, or ostensibly went to, but these were only rumours.
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N5UD
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« Reply #29 on: September 06, 2011, 08:44:08 AM »

Romeo where art thou ?

Reading about this guy, antics, and crimes is on one hand funny. Yet on the other criminal.

He is in the Brooklyn detention center.

I found this series of QSL cards that made laugh. Note the P5/ card.

73 Tony N5UD
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