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Author Topic: Keys  (Read 484 times)
KE4IZA
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Posts: 240




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« on: April 01, 2003, 07:28:59 AM »


       I have pretty much decided on an iambic key for my first key.  The next decision is a sigle or double paddle?  Any comments out there?
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N5CTI
Member

Posts: 69




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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2003, 07:58:47 AM »

I'm not an authority on the subject, but I've never heard anyone recommend starting with anything but a straight key. The reasoning goes that by actually controlling all aspects of producing the code instead of relying on the keyer to do half of the work for you gives you a much stronger foundation on which to build your keying speed.

But as I said, I'm not an authority. I only have a straight key myself; I expect I'll go for quite a while before I switch to a paddle and keyer.

73,

Boyd / N5CTI
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20575




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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2003, 01:23:23 PM »

KE4IZA, by definition, an "iambic" key is a dual-paddle key.  You can't use iambic mode keying with a single lever paddle.

You can use electronic keying with either type, but the iambic mode dictates the use of two paddles, so you can operate using "squeeze keying."  This is not possible with a single lever design.

WB2WIK/6
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N0UY
Member

Posts: 158




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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2003, 01:47:09 PM »

If you are set on using a paddle I would think either a single or double paddle would be easy enough to learn.  However, to me the squeeze technique seems very unatural and it may not be supported by all keyers.  The single paddle motion is easiliy mimicked on the double paddle and the BY-1 by Bencher for example allows you to set the gap as close or as far as you wish.  I agree with the previous comment that the straight key gives you the most control and probably the most satisfaction of a job well done.  With that being said, my fist seems to come and go, and at times resembles the sound of a car with a flat tire.  The more I use it the less flats I seem to get.  The bottom line is whatever you choose, stick with it long enough to master it before moving on to something else.

73  Ray  N0UY
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KB1JQX
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2003, 05:43:26 PM »

You can find a key I made from a computer mouse along with instructions at this link
http://www.wgunnell.com
just click on the 'LATEST" button.
Enjoy!
-Wayne
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N0XAS
Member

Posts: 71


WWW

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« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2003, 11:28:27 PM »

I just switched from a Vibrokeyer (single lever) to a Brass Racer (dual lever) a couple of weeks ago.  I have to say I agree that squeeze keying feels a little unnatural.  If I'm looking at the thing while doing it, I can use the squeeze for C, Q, L, F, etc.  If I'm not looking at the key and my fingers, it's a recipe for mistakes.  Odd, I know.  Maybe I'll get more used to it in time, but for now I use it just like the single lever about 95% or more of the time.  Ask me in a few months, maybe that will change.

73,
Dale - N0XAS
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W4TYU
Member

Posts: 518




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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2003, 09:42:26 PM »

I have heard many operators who have fallen into bad habits by using iambic paddle. It is set with a light tough and is very easy to run words (or letters) together.This sending to me is difficult to copy.

Use a straight key until you can send and receive 15 to 18 wpm.  Record your sending (either type) on a tape recorder and copy it the next day. You quickly will become very humble.

Ole man Jean  (CW since 1944)
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