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Author Topic: Keyers  (Read 406 times)
KB9SDS
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Posts: 2




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« on: April 19, 2003, 03:52:49 PM »

I have a Kenwood TR-9130 all-mode 2m radio. I would like to try working CW on it, but I don't know if it needs a keyer and if it does what would be the best one for the job. I also have a Yaesu FT-101 EX (waiting in the wings for my upgrade). Do I need a keyer for that as well or can I connect the key directly into the radio.
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2003, 08:24:28 AM »

You should be able to connect a straight key directly to the radios.  However if you want to use paddles or a bug, you will need a keyer.  I.e.  connect the paddles or bug to the keyer and the keyer to the radio.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20574




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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2003, 01:07:03 PM »

A "bug" doesn't require any sort of keyer.  It is an electromechanical key that forms dits and dahs as you use it, with all work done mechanically; there's no powered electronics involved.

Using electronic keying is a different story, and an outboard electronic keyer is required with both rigs mentioned.

But, a simple hand key, or a "bug," can be plugged straight into the KEY jack of either radio and used on CW without any other accessories.

WB2WIK/6
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KC0JBJ
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Posts: 35




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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2003, 02:28:26 AM »

"A "bug" doesn't require any sort of keyer. It is an electromechanical key that forms dits and dahs as you use it, with all work done mechanically; there's no powered electronics involved."

Hmm, bascially correct, except the term "bug" is used to describe a SEMI-automatic key.  The dits are formed mechanically as you state, but the dahs are formed manually by the operator.  

I have heard of individuals homebrewing a true fully-automatic electro-mechanical key that does both dits and dahs, but the classic "bug", e.g. Vibroplex et al, is semi-automatic.

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