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Author Topic: Q-signal use  (Read 966 times)
KC0OXQ
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Posts: 4




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« on: June 08, 2003, 10:55:24 AM »

I'm a little confused on how to use Q-signals as an interrogative.

For example: If I send QRU, am I asking have you anything for me or stating I have nothing for you?

I've spent many hours using Q-signals operating teletype in the FAA. The correct teletype procedure was to follow the interrogative with a Q.  If I wanted to know if another station has any info about a certain aircraft, I would send:

QRUQ N12345

The other station would begin their reply with QRU followed by their message as:

QRU N12345 O/AMA 1845 OKC E1945

I'm new at code and my hearing speed is still very slow.  Either the QSOs I've monitored have not used Q-signals other than QTH, or I've just plain ol' missed them?

Is it correct to just send ?
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20599




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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2003, 02:01:35 PM »

Common Q signals can be questions or replies (or simple statements) depending whether the signal is followed by a "?" or not.

QTH means "my location is..."
QTH? means "where are you?"
QRU means I have nothing for you
QRU? means "have you anything for me?"

...and on it goes...

WB2WIK/6
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KC0OXQ
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2003, 05:42:00 PM »

The use of the question mark is certainly a simple solution and should have been obvious to me. Thanks for the help. I guess I was just stuck in that TTY rut!

Baudot code has a FIGS character for ? but it wasn't used in Q-symbols, at least in FAA Q-symbol convention.  I just assumed that was universal.

73 and thanks again,
Dave, KCØOXQ
CR>
CR> LTRS>
LF>
LF>
LF>
LF>
LF>
LF>
NNNN
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2003, 07:38:09 PM »

Also in ordinary, every day conversational usage, the variety of Q signals used is usually rather low.  QTH is the commonest and is used in almost every QSO.

If you get involved in message handling, a lot more of the Q signals are used.
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KG4PIL
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2003, 12:00:24 AM »

As an ex military CW operator, I had the same problem when I first became a ham. In the military, to make a Q signal interrogative, you would send INT before the Q signal. Like INT QRV would mean, are you ready to recieve?INT is a prosign and is overscored which means it's all sent together with no space between the letters. It didn't take me long to get used to sending the ? after the Q signal though.
   73s de KG4PIL George
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K0RS
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Posts: 717




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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2003, 06:42:52 AM »

Ditto Steve's (WIK) comments.  Any Q signal can be a question or statement.  One of the most abused, or perhaps misunderstood, is QRL.  If you send "QRL?" you are asking if the frequency is use.  If someone replies "QRL" it means (emphatically) "Yes!  The frequency IS in use!"
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