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Author Topic: Ham Radio Deluxe has been sold  (Read 19139 times)
K3TN
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« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2011, 03:32:21 AM »

I've used free contesting logging programs, and I've paid for some. I've ended up with N1MM because it best fits the way I like to operate, not because it is free.

I've used free day-to-day logging programs, and I've paid for some. I ended up most recently on HRD because the Logger screen just nailed the way I like to operate. I contributed via Paypal to help support continued improvements, be glad to pay for it if that gets the bug fix/wish list upgrades restarted.

It is absolutely flabbergasting to me how much the N1MM team and AA6YQ do completely for free on N1MM and DX Labs. Just another one of the amazing aspects about this hobby.

John K3TN
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John K3TN
W4PC
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« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2011, 06:26:09 AM »

I think of some of guys have retirement incomes from companies they worked for that gives them living expenses.  I know Dave worked for Rose and IBM for year, and I hope he got a nice package from them. Dave writes good code, as does Tom (N1MM).  N1MM is very well designed and its closed source Wink... 

I'm 51, still working. Hams have been good to me over the years, but when 2008 hit, all my retirement savings was GONE in a flash.  My dad is 73 and still working... so Im looking foward to at least another good 20 or so years.

This is my 30th year as a ham.  Something Im very proud of too.

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AA6YQ
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« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2011, 09:08:03 AM »

It is absolutely flabbergasting to me how much the N1MM team and AA6YQ do completely for free on N1MM and DX Labs.

I know Dave worked for Rose and IBM for year, and I hope he got a nice package from them.

I spent 22 years building Rational Software, one of whose products was Rational Rose. My development teams also produced Apex (a very sophisticated development environment for Ada that was used to develop the software for the International Space Station, the Canadian Air Traffic Control System, the Boeing 777, and many other aero/defense projects), the Unified Modeling Language (placed into the public domain under the stewardship of the Object Management Group), the Rational Unified Process, ClearCase, ClearQuest, and the Rational Suites. We took the company public in 1994, and drove annual sales north of $800M before selling the company to IBM in 2003. I owed IBM a year, and spent it setting up the Eclipse Foundation, a highly successful open source consortium. I am not retired; I provide software engineering consulting services to several clients, and recently led the successful introduction of wireless electronic voting into a New England Town Meeting.

I got my ham license in 1990, around the time that Rational stopped developing its own hardware (I began professional life as a CPU design engineer at Data General; see Soul of a New Machine). I was disappointed by the poor quality of commercial ham radio applications, and so in 1995 began developing an integrated application to support my DXing activities. As Simon HB9DRV discovered a decade later with HRD 4, a monolithic application is a very bad idea; it's unwieldy to develop, deploy, support, and maintain. In 2000, I refactored this code base into the set of interoperating applications now known as the DXLab Suite; that process is described here.

The DXLab Suite is available for free, and always will be; I neither solicit nor accept donations. I do this several reasons:
  • - to increase the pressure on companies that commercially sell amateur radio applications to improve the quality and functionality of their products
  • - to gain first-hand experience with several software engineering practices (e.g. correct every defect within 24 hours of its being reported, interact directly with end-users)
  • - to exploit the knowledge, experience, and passion of a large base of DXers to drive DXLab forward
  • - because I enjoy designing and implementing applications that improve life for their users

I have lots of experience with open source, but the DXLab Suite is closed source because orchestrating the work of multiple developers within one application is not much fun; just ask Linus. However, the messaging scheme that DXLab applications use to communicate is publicly documented, which has enabled many other developers to build applications that directly interoperate with DXLab applications (e.g. MultiPSK, SpotSpy), or that enable DXLab applications to interoperate with other applications (e.g. Fldigi, MixW, CW Skimmer, JT-Alert, DX Atlas, N1MM, MMTTY, MMVARI, MMSSTV, DM780). The resulting DXLab ecosystem allows users to pick and choose the applications that best meet their needs without losing interoperation or automation.

    73,

          Dave, AA6YQ
« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 11:19:21 PM by AA6YQ » Logged
AA4HA
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« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2011, 09:15:59 AM »

Dave,
I love DXLAB, it has been very useful for me. Thanks for the efforts you put into it.

Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W4PC
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« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2011, 10:13:13 AM »

It is absolutely flabbergasting to me how much the N1MM team and AA6YQ do completely for free on N1MM and DX Labs.

I know Dave worked for Rose and IBM for year, and I hope he got a nice package from them.

I spent 22 years building Rational Software, one of whose products was Rational Rose. My development teams also produced Apex (a very sophisticated development environment for Ada that was used to develop the software for the International Space Station, the Canadian Air Traffic Control System, the Boeing 777, and many other aero/defense projects), the Unified Modeling Language (placed into the public domain under the stewardship of the Object Management Group), the Rational Unified Process, ClearCase, ClearQuest, and the Rational Suites. We took the company public in 1994, and drove annual sales north of $800M before selling the company to IBM in 2003. I owed IBM a year, and spent it setting up the Eclipse Foundation, a highly successful open source consortium. I am not retired; I provide software engineering consulting services to several clients, and recently led the successful introduction of wireless electronic voting into a New England Town Meeting.

   73,

          Dave, AA6YQ

Nah, never said you were retired, I just IBM, Microsoft and others provide retirement packages which give you income coming in. My ex wife who was a PhD with TVA got one of those.. you get the whole 9 yards, pension, healthcare etc.

And that was the same reason I started writing ham software.  I didnt see anything well designed and with my years at MSFT, I wanted to do good code for the hams.
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AA4HA
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« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2011, 11:35:02 AM »

Rude, belittling comments and insinuation from folks like W8JX makes me wonder why anyone would even bother to write software for the amateur radio community.

Most of the folks start doing it because they are hams and want some cool feature or functionality that is not out there today. Then some share it with the community at large and in some cases it becomes one of the de-facto standards. Another one that I really enjoy using is SpectrumLab by DL4YHF. People lead other lives than just coding an application that they give away. It only takes one ill wind who complains about an essentially free application to turn off any future developers from even trying.

I do not have a talent for writing code. I have done it before and it is right up there with a visit to the dentist and I appreciate the talents and dedication of those who can carry a project like HRD onwards for several years.

If kicking a few bucks into the kitty helps keep these folks motivated to burn the midnight oil then I am all for it.

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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W5DQ
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« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2011, 11:54:15 AM »

The resulting DXLab ecosystem allows users to pick and choose the applications that best meet their needs without losing interoperation or automation.


I think this is one of the most powerful features of the DX Lab environment. I have used several of the DX Lab interfaces to integrate a very useful operating workspace while maintaining a single all inclusive (and trackable) database of QSOs. Before I setup the current config, I was using seperate apps and having to port over the entries into the DXKEEPER log. Using the 'bridges' available between DX Lab and other ham software, I no longer need to do that. I use MixW and N1MM mainly for specific functions and every QSO shows up right in the main log in DXKEEPER and can be counted as needed for awards, progress, spotting needs, etc.

Keep up the great work Dave.   Grin

73

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
AA6YQ
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« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2011, 12:34:31 PM »

Nah, never said you were retired, I just IBM, Microsoft and others provide retirement packages which give you income coming in.

I don't have a "package" from anybody. I turned down both of Microsoft's offers; as a company they are "low and slow".
« Last Edit: September 23, 2011, 02:30:54 PM by AA6YQ » Logged
STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #23 on: September 23, 2011, 02:51:31 PM »

Gosh! Tisha, do you realise the hypocrisy of criticising W8JX for being critical when you are doing the same thing to him?

As regards the other posts - I feel like I am watching an episode of the mutual admiration society, peacock division.

Although all hams benefit from the efforts of other hams who write software, lets be honest and enumerate (code talk)
the reasons why they do it.

1. They see a need and decide they can fill it, by coding in their spare time.
2. They are looking for a business opportunity in a niche market with limited support.
3. They are saintly individuals who want to leave the world a little better off after their limited time on this plane of existence.

In many cases reason 1 morphs into reason 2, and so many applications are born and prosper.

Reason 3 has a few members, and they are frequently maligned individuals who suffer the barbs of those who they help.

However,  as humans, we love our saints, although frequently we will persecute them while they are with us, but woe betide
any saint who falls from their pedestal.

So, in life, decide if you are a hobbyist programmer, businessman making a living from ham software, or a saint.
Mixing the categories only results in enraging the villagers and begets lighting of torches and honing of pitchforks.

Now, let the back slapping continue ...
« Last Edit: September 23, 2011, 07:33:46 PM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
AA6YQ
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« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2011, 12:14:45 PM »

I feel like I am watching an episode of the mutual admiration society, peacock division.

Yes, I am very proud of DXlab, its user community, and its ecosystem. I talk about them every opportunity I get. Even in the "free software" software business, awareness is critical.

With a major "free software" package like HRD being taken commercial, users would naturally wonder if the same thing might some day happen to DXLab. The answer is never. I have no need to monetize DXLab; more importantly, its development process is highly sustainable:

- there is no demoralizing backlog of defects, because every reported defect has been corrected

- each application includes auditing capabilities that dramatically reduce the time required to identify and correct a defect - even if that defect only shows itself on one user's system

- the Launcher's "one-click upgrade" enables a corrected application to be immediately made available to the user community

- Commander's built-in CAT message recorder makes it easy to support new transceivers as they are announced, and to improve support for existing transceivers; for example, when Icom released firmware updates late last year that enable the ic7600, ic7700, and ic7800 to report whether or not Split is enabled (finally!), a new version of Commander exploiting this capability was available within days

- the Suite's modular architecture enables new capabilities to be added to one application without adversely impacting the others

As a result, working on DXLab is fun; most of my DXLab time is spent interacting with the user community and implementing new ideas -- large and small. To me, there are few things more satisfying than to see a user's initial suggestion evolve through spirited discussion on the DXLab Yahoo group and then become available to the user community within a day or three. You can't buy that feeling anywhere.

    73,

          Dave, AA6YQ

« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 12:17:02 PM by AA6YQ » Logged
STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2011, 10:26:18 PM »

I feel like I am watching an episode of the mutual admiration society, peacock division.

Yes, I am very proud of DXlab, its user community, and its ecosystem. I talk about them every opportunity I get. Even in the "free software" software business, awareness is critical.

With a major "free software" package like HRD being taken commercial, users would naturally wonder if the same thing might some day happen to DXLab. The answer is never. I have no need to monetize DXLab; more importantly, its development process is highly sustainable:

As a result, working on DXLab is fun; most of my DXLab time is spent interacting with the user community and implementing new ideas -- large and small. To me, there are few things more satisfying than to see a user's initial suggestion evolve through spirited discussion on the DXLab Yahoo group and then become available to the user community within a day or three. You can't buy that feeling anywhere.

    73,

          Dave, AA6YQ



Dave,
Although it pains me to admit being wrong,  you are a person who is worthy of putting your thoughts and beliefs out there.
Hopefully the same spirit of giving and fun with life is present in other developers, but I suspect it is rare, as all good things are.

Please accept my apology - in your case, you are a genuine ham hero, but I will not cast that apology wider than yourself.

73s and thank you for giving so much to the ham community.

Best Regards.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 10:31:20 PM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
N4NYY
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Posts: 4820




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« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2011, 01:32:19 PM »

I'd pay for it. Personally, I cannot believe he didn't charge, for the quality product he put out.
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K3TN
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« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2011, 03:16:00 AM »

It is absolutely flabbergasting to me how much the N1MM team and AA6YQ do completely for free on N1MM and DX Labs.

.... My development teams also produced Apex (a very sophisticated development environment for Ada that was used to develop the software for the International Space Station, the Canadian Air Traffic Control System, the Boeing 777, and many other aero/defense projects), ....

          Dave, AA6YQ

Ah, the memories: Ada! I worked for GTE Government Systems from 1983 - 1994 and we were one of the early users of Rational for a large Ada project in the mid 1980s. Large at the time meant several hundred thousand lines of code to run on DEC Vax systems.

Also at that time I was one of the first users of Ken Wolff's (K1EA) CT contest logging software, demonstrating it at a Potomac Valley Radio Club meeting in 1985 or so. At about the same time, AK1A at YCCC had developed the Packetcluster software. Amazing how the movement of computers into ham radio has changed operating (for better and for worse) but also how amazingly sophisticated the Loggers and DX Labs are today. Through in LoTW, eQSL and QRZ.com - huge changes.

John K3TN
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John K3TN
NQ4A
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« Reply #28 on: September 26, 2011, 05:32:39 AM »

Thank you Simon Brown for a job well done!
NQ4A
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KF7DS
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Posts: 192




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« Reply #29 on: September 26, 2011, 10:48:11 PM »

Any possibility of DXLab or variant for Mac OSX?

Don
KF7QZB
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