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Author Topic: Ham Radio Deluxe has been sold  (Read 17900 times)
AA6YQ
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« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2011, 10:14:18 PM »

Any possibility of DXLab or variant for Mac OSX?

As a native application, no. DXLab runs well on a Mac using Parallels, as described here.

   73,

        Dave, AA6YQ
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K3DCW
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« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2011, 04:04:20 AM »

Any possibility of DXLab or variant for Mac OSX?

Don
KF7QZB


As pointed out, it does run in Parallels.  However, why do that when there is some great OS X native software out there.

MacLoggerDX, RUMlog (my personal favorite, and FREE!!!), Aether all do logging, telnet to the DX clusters, award tracking, and much more.

Spot for dedicated DX cluster support

Fldigi/cocoaModem for digital modes (Fldigi can't be beat on any platform!!!)

Flwkey for WinKey USB support on any platform

Flrig for rig control on any platform

MultiScan for SSTV

Fllog for multi-op log access

RUMped and SkookumLogger for contest logging

Combine Flrig/Flwkey/Fldigi and, if necessary, Fllog and you have a cross-platform, open-source HRD/DXLab type of integrated suite running natively on OS X.

...and there is a lot more that I didn't mention.

Not to take anything away from DXLab...it is a great suite.  My point being that there is a LOT of great ham radio software that is native to the Mac.

73

Dave
K3DCW
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2011, 07:59:06 PM »

As pointed out, it does run in Parallels.  However, why do that when there is some great OS X native software out there?

Besides the usual logging, transceiver control, DX spot collection and digital mode features you'll find in most applications, DXLab provides many additional capabilities - but keep in mind that you can learn these capabilities step-by step as you add applications in whatever order you choose:

- controls up to 4 transceivers, with optional transceiver selection by frequency

- supports transverters for 6m, 4m, 2m, and 70cm operation

- can direct a secondary transceiver or receiver to follow the primary transceiver's frequency and mode

- interoperates with SDR Consoles used as panadaptors (e.g. SpectraVue) or skimmers (e.g. CW Skimmer)

- provides 10 banks of 10 memories, with the ability to continuously scan a bank's frequencies

- as you QSY, displays frequency-dependent settings for devices like tuners, amplifiers, and antenna switches, with optional control via parallel port signals

- provides user-defined transceiver control sequences initiated by up to 16 buttons and up to 8 sliders; for example, see http://www.dxlabsuite.com/commander/screenshot1.jpg

- provides both map-driven and callsign-driven operation of all commercial PC-controllable rotators

- can display a translation for up to 50 "QSO phrases" in the languages likely used by your QSO partner based on his or her DXCC entity; more than 60 languages are supported

- tracks confirmation and verification of QSOs for DXCC, TopList, and WAZ awards, highlighting needed DX spots, automatically generating outgoing QSLs that request confirmation of needed QSLs, identifying confirmed QSOs for submission to the ARRL DXCC desk, and generating DXCC submission paperwork

- highlights DX spots needed for the annual CQ DX Marathon award, and generates the required submission spreadsheet

- reports progress towards DXCC, TopList, Challenge, VUCC, Marathon, WAS, WAC, IOTA, WAZ, WPX, USA-CA, Canadaward, Holyland, DOK, WAE, WAB, DFM, SRR, RDA, WAHUC, WAIP, WAJA, JCC, JCG, and AJA awards

- synchronizes with LotW and eQSL.cc, initiating upload and download operations with a single mouse click without requiring the user to manually invoke TQSL, deal with ADIF files, or use a separate application

- extracts address information from all 3 CDROM callbooks and QRZ.com (free with advertising, or no advertising with subscription)

- provides one-click access to more than 80 web-accessible sources of QSL information

- directly prints QSL labels and 4-to-a-page QSL cards - with or without a background image

- directly prints addresses on envelopes or labels

- provides operations that can alter many logged QSOs simultaneously without requiring the user to modify ADIF files -- e.g. performing callbook lookups on already-logged QSOs, or adjusting the start times of QSOs logged during a specific time range, or extracting QTH information from COMMENT fields, or...

- captures DX spots from up to 6 sources (telnet clusters, packetclusters, DX Summit), creating and maintaining a local database with one entry for each active DX station that is color coded by "need" and LotW/eQSL participation, and whose entries can be independently filtered and displayed in a table, on its world map, and on a zoomable bandspread

- optionally announces needed DX spots, and includes a web server that makes all spots browser-accessible from anywhere on your home network

- extracts QSX frequencies from DX spot notes, enabling accurate transceiver setup for split frequency operation with one user action

- captures solar and geomagnetic data from WWV spots and uses this data to display easy-to-understand QST-style graphical propagation forecasts, and to depict the auroral oval on its world map (choice of VOACAP, ICEPAC, or IONCAP propagation forecasting engines, all of which are included)

- monitors user-specified NCDXF/IARU HF beacon schedules to rapidly calibrate propagation forecasts with actual propagation

- decodes all PSK31 or PSK63 or PSK125 QSOs within your transceiver's bandpass and extract callsigns to create and maintain a "stations heard" window

- simultaneously runs soundcard RTTY (using the MMTTY engine) and an optional external modem (e.g. a KAM or PK232) to provide diversity decoding or the ability to simultaneously decode a DX station and callers

- supports PSK, RTTY, CW (generation only), and Phone (voice keying) with a single user interface and macro facility

- interoperates with MultiPSK, MMSSTV, MMVARI, MMTTY, MixW, Fldigi, DM780, HRD, DX Atlas, and CW Skimmer

- is updated with user-suggested features frequently, and downloads/installs upgrades with a single mouse click

- is driven by an active and friendly user community open to everyone

User-reported defects are generally corrected within 24 hours. At this moment, the number of reported but uncorrected defects across all members of the DXLab Suite is 0.

    73,

          Dave, AA6YQ
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K3DCW
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« Reply #33 on: September 29, 2011, 04:24:05 AM »

As pointed out, it does run in Parallels.  However, why do that when there is some great OS X native software out there?

Besides the usual logging, transceiver control, DX spot collection and digital mode features you'll find in most applications, DXLab provides many additional capabilities - but keep in mind that you can learn these capabilities step-by step as you add applications in whatever order you choose:

As I said, Dave, the DXLab suite is a great package of programs. 

My only point being that if you want to run Windows, run Windows. If you want to run OS X, there are comparable packages on OS X as well.  And, while Parallels is great, if you really want to run Windows programs, BootCamp is probably a better choice to start with (from a performance standpoint) although it does take you out of the OS X environment.   

Ideally, all software would be written to be platform-agnostic, much like Fldigi which runs on Windows, Linux, OS X, and BSD. However, that isn't the case, so we have to deal with various ways to run various software packages.  The beautiful thing is that it can be done, in most cases; and at least we do have a choice in software.

73,

Dave
K3DCW

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AA6YQ
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2011, 07:58:16 AM »


My only point being that if you want to run Windows, run Windows. If you want to run OS X, there are comparable packages on OS X as well. 

My point is that the packages are only functionally comparable if you don't need most of the capabilities on the above list.

Ideally, all software would be written to be platform-agnostic

Had a viable cross-platform development environment been available when I started on DXLab in 1995, I'd have employed it.

    73,

         Dave, AA6YQ
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W4PC
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« Reply #35 on: September 30, 2011, 07:53:25 AM »

I've been looking at some options for converting the HRD code to use WxWindows. This would be a cross platform solution. The biggest difference between the O/S's is the user interface. When I was using Visual Studio for the Mac (which had MFC for the Mac) to try do convert the then Pacterm/Pkterm code, the biggest complaint was not that the code didnt work, but it 'looked' like a Windows program on the Mac.

The low level stuff is easy, it's the user interface look and feel that's time consuming.

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K3DCW
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« Reply #36 on: September 30, 2011, 09:11:23 AM »

I've been looking at some options for converting the HRD code to use WxWindows. This would be a cross platform solution. The biggest difference between the O/S's is the user interface. When I was using Visual Studio for the Mac (which had MFC for the Mac) to try do convert the then Pacterm/Pkterm code, the biggest complaint was not that the code didnt work, but it 'looked' like a Windows program on the Mac.

The low level stuff is easy, it's the user interface look and feel that's time consuming.

WxWindows (now WxWidgets, btw) is a good tool.  Audacity uses it too good effect, for example.  And it supports a lot of the host system's window management capability and design.

Another possibility for cross-platform coding is the Fast-Light Toolkit (FLTK), used by the Fldigi/Flwkey/Fllog/Flrig programs, among others.  The biggest negative is that it uses its own interface design instead of the host system.  On the other hand, it would allow you to develop an unique "HRD" look that would hold cross-platform and it is designed to be Fast and Light, and thus high-performance even on systems with less horsepower.

73

Dave
K3DCW
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #37 on: September 30, 2011, 05:47:16 PM »

The low level stuff is easy, it's the user interface look and feel that's time consuming.

And that time spent moving sideways is time not spent moving forward. The technical term for this concept is opportunity cost.

    73,

         Dave, AA6YQ
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WS3N
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« Reply #38 on: September 30, 2011, 07:47:24 PM »

I use Qt for Windows/Linux cross-platform development. I believe they support Macs.

73 Jack
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KF7DS
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« Reply #39 on: October 02, 2011, 07:44:39 AM »

I use Qt for Windows/Linux cross-platform development. I believe they support Macs.

73 Jack

Having more choices for the Mac would be great! Not that MacloggerDX isnt a great program - it is!, but choice and competition makes everyone better.

Don
KF7QZB
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K3DCW
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« Reply #40 on: October 02, 2011, 09:10:18 AM »


Having more choices for the Mac would be great! Not that MacloggerDX isnt a great program - it is!, but choice and competition makes everyone better.

Don
KF7QZB

MacLoggerDX is just one choice....there is competition and choices on OS X; however, most don't get past MLDX to try the others.

My personal choice on OS X is RUMlog.  There is also Aether, YeaLogger, jLog, and likely a couple more.  For contest logging, both RUMped and Skookum Logger are outstanding. Finally, Fldigi has a built-in logbook program as well.

And don't forget, as Dave (AA6YQ) will likely remind us, DX Lab software runs just fine in Parallels as does most other Windows logging software. 

I, for one, would love to see HRD ported over to OS X (and Linux!). 

73,

Dave
K3DCW
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KF7DS
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« Reply #41 on: October 02, 2011, 10:26:12 PM »


Having more choices for the Mac would be great! Not that MacloggerDX isnt a great program - it is!, but choice and competition makes everyone better.

Don
KF7QZB

MacLoggerDX is just one choice....there is competition and choices on OS X; however, most don't get past MLDX to try the others.

My personal choice on OS X is RUMlog.  There is also Aether, YeaLogger, jLog, and likely a couple more.  For contest logging, both RUMped and Skookum Logger are outstanding. Finally, Fldigi has a built-in logbook program as well.

And don't forget, as Dave (AA6YQ) will likely remind us, DX Lab software runs just fine in Parallels as does most other Windows logging software. 

I, for one, would love to see HRD ported over to OS X (and Linux!). 

73,

Dave
K3DCW

Thanks for the feedback.

Don
KF7QZB
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