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Author Topic: morse code  (Read 487 times)
KC0OWO
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Posts: 3




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« on: August 18, 2003, 04:59:15 PM »

Well i'm new to ham radio just got my tech license jan of this year.Like alot people i'm coming from cb i'm not a trouble maker i do more listening than i do talking. Last month passed the written for general but i froze on the morse code test.Only had about three days of actually learning code.I dont if was different cause i was learning code with headphones or not i was passing the QSO's on my software, but when i took the test like i said i froze dont know what happened.All this debate over code is getting little old.I myself think they should leave it.Unlike a bunch of folks i want to learn it you never know when you'll need it.If the voice frequency's are busy you can spin the dial to cw and maybe learn a thing or two.By the way does anyone know any frequencys that they do about five words a minute on the ones i've found are little to fast i can get some of the codes but i miss alot of them.I recently purchased a ICOM IC-718 so one way or another i am going to get my general license september 21. Any information i can get or help i can get would be appreciated thank you.73's KC0OWO Mark
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20633




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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2003, 06:16:21 PM »

In the Novice subbands it's easy to find folks chatting away at 5 wpm.  On 40m, try 7100 to 7150 kHz, especially on Saturday or Sunday morning between 7:00 and 10:00 AM local time.

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AD6WL
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Posts: 181


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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2003, 01:23:24 PM »

Below is an article that I wrote for new CW ops who want to either operate QRS or want to improve their speed.  Also check the W1AW schedule on the internet.  They send practice CW at 5wpm and up and the signal is very strong.  

http://www.arrl.org/w1aw.html

You have just passed your code test and now what? You may try listening on the bands and find that the speeds are just to fast for you to even think about trying to copy. This can get very discouraging for a new ham. Many new hams want to operate CW but often find the speeds they hear on the air to be very intimidating. You can just listen to the ARRL CW practice on the air but that gets boring after awhile. There is another option. There is a Yahoo group devoted to QRS CW. This is a great opportunity for new hams to get together with other hams who operate at the same speed and for some of you experienced CW ops to share information with the group and QRS to make contacts with these new hams. I have found the best way to enjoy CW was to make contacts with other hams. After operating QRS for a while you will notice that your speed will start to increase. The website for the group is: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/QRS-CW/.

Here is a list of the unofficial QRS CW operating frequencies. These frequencies are only a guideline as a place for the group to meet and are not part of any band plan. If you hear a slow speed CQ out there then answer the call and enjoy a relaxed QSO at a slower speed.

1.850
3.700
7.124/7.050
10.125
14.050
21.150/21.125
24.8915
28.160

Most QRS activity seems to be on 7.050 & 14.050.

73, Jim
AD6WL
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KG6JEV
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2003, 12:57:29 PM »

Quote:

Last month passed the written for general but i froze on the morse code test.Only had about three days of actually learning code.I dont if was different cause i was learning code with headphones or not i was passing the QSO's on my software, but when i took the test like i said i froze dont know what happened.

:Unquote

I spent three months studying and learning code and still had a momentary lapse of memory. It can, and does happen, to a lot of us. I would suggest going back and study for at least a month. Put in whatever time feels comfortable for you. When you feel your brain getting tired of deciphering the code, give it a break. I started out with about 5 to 10 minutes a day and slowly worked up to about an hour. You've demonstrated that you want to learn and use it, so spend a little more time with 'the books', then go back and give it another shot. You can do it! Another hint - once you've learned all the characters, practice receiving actual words or sentences. Use a code practice program (such as Numorse), or use a code practice station, such as W1AW. Do not listen to actual on-the-air QSO's, as the operator's spacing may be incorrect. As for me, after my mental lock-up, I pulled it together and continued on with the test - passing on my first try.

73 de Steven / KG6JEV/4
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2003, 08:19:25 AM »

Three days of study on Morse code is not sufficient.  You need to practice until it is a reflex.  You hear the sound and write the letter.  The average person needs about 30 hours study/practice to get to a reliable 5wpm.
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KC0OWO
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2003, 11:39:11 PM »

thanks for all the replies have to get back on it september 21 is coming up quick hopefully make a few contacts with you all thanks again 73's
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K7VO
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Posts: 1010




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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2003, 01:48:57 PM »

I agree with those who say three days isn't enough.  Take a month, working at least 15-20 minutes twice a day.  You'll be fine.

72/73,
Caity
K7VO
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