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Author Topic: cw operation  (Read 2253 times)
AA1ZF
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Posts: 9




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« on: December 10, 2003, 10:08:06 PM »

I am interested in improving my cw and am studying to become more proficient. Many helpful hints on this forum.  I recently purchased a Bencher BY-1 and am setting it up.  My question is: what does full break in, semi break in, and no break in refer to.
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N8CPA
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2003, 07:43:39 AM »

Break-in (QSK) refers to the ability to receive sigs between sent characters. Full break-in enables instantaneous transmit to receive switching time. Semi uses the same switching time as voice modes.  Between the 2, I prefer full.

 
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NI0C
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Posts: 2383




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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2003, 09:06:06 AM »

Virtually all modern transceivers present you with a choice of full or semi break-in operation.  With both of these changeover from receive to transmit is accomplished by simply operating your key.  In many old "boat-anchor" setups, you first needed to operate one or more switches to go from receive to transmit and back again, although some setups allowed full break-in.  

With full break-in, you can be interrupted by the other op more readily, and you will know instantly if he/she is transmitting.  Semi break-in would require at least a slight pause in sending to hear what is going on.

Some of the pros and cons of these methods were discussed in a thread under this "CW" topic started on 10/02/03.  Currently that thread would be found on page 3.

73 de Chuck  NI0C
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K6KRV
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2004, 08:27:12 PM »

OK. I think I'm right. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, I'm sure!!

Full breakin. As you send, you can hear the frequency "between" dits and dahs. So, if you working full breakin and the recipient wants to "interupt", he/she can immediately.

Semi breakin. As you send, and if you pause slightly, you can hear the frequency. Usually transmitters have a relay "delay". As long as you're keying at a particular speed, the frequency is not heard. Pause for the amount of the as the delays requires, and you can hear the frequency. Good if needed.

Otherwise, no breakin is simply as it sounds. Hit transmit and send until you hit receive.

I like semi breakin, although with good operators, full break-in is good for a "quick two way" conversation or to interject a question. It can be a bit confusing sometimes -- until you get used to it.

Dennis K6KRV
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N7DM
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Posts: 671




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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2003, 11:44:03 AM »

I have 'some' experience in The Music Mode... And, on those rare times I have had to operate Non-QSK... as in Field Day with Brother XYZ's  old Kenwood... it is really hard to do.  I am SO used to knowing what is going on..on my frequency. Really, it is more than the ability to break (stop) somebody when the phone rings.  It IS that knowledge of what's going on. When I call somebody and he starts to answer somebody else, I instantly know it and just quit sending. In a QSO, if there is QRM on the freq, I hear it..and can ask the other station if it is bothering him.  Get used to it and you will never like to be without.  And today's QSK rigs... at least the Ten-Tec's I am familiar with, have far better QSK than the kind I had 'back when' with my  HRO / Transmitter / and  T-R switch !

I suppose the term Semi-Break-in is somebody's pet lamb, but *I* think the term is just to help sell a rig to someone that has yet to discover the advantages of Full Break-in  (QSK)...

73
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