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Author Topic: 10 Meter CW  (Read 2111 times)
KJ7XJ
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Posts: 34




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« on: February 24, 2004, 06:56:35 PM »

On a good day when 10 is open, I hear many beacons from 28.150 to 28.300 I also hear some high speed operators down at the low end. I am wondering if there is a band plan for 10 that has a general CW call frequency? I have not found anything like this. I would like to call CW on 10, but I am afriad I might be covering a beacon or satelite or something. I could send a slow cq in the low end, but then I would be taking away from the speed racers. Anyone know of an area of the CW sub-band on 10 thats used as a general call frequency?
                Eric
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2004, 09:24:31 PM »

Here is the ARRL web site showing the band plan for 10 meters.

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/bandplan.html#10m

Plus check out the FISTS web site and the 10-10 club website for their calling frequencies.
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W5HTW
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2004, 12:00:20 AM »

Well, one should try to avoid the beacon frequencies, of course, but even they are not totally untouchable.  I hear QSO's going on between beacons and I find nothing wrong with that.  I would not plop down on there and call CQ myself, but if a particular frequency is not occupied with a beacon, then you probably won't be heard where the beacons are.

As to calling slow speed CW in the "high speed" section, remember, there IS no high speed section.  The new qualifying code speed to operate on the band, anywhere,  is 5 wpm, and if you can do that, or even close to it, you have every right to be there (in accordance with the terms of your license, of course.)  Again, I would not park within a few hertz of a higher speed contact and call CQ, but move 500 hertz away from them and go at it.  Don't feel guilty; you are a ham, too.  

Use courtesy, listen before you transmit (and not just for ten seconds, but long enough to see if someone is talking with someone else you don't hear) and then go for it.  Normally I'll monitor a specific frequency for three or four full minutes before I decide it is open for me to use.  For if "A" is in QSO with "B", due to prop I may not hear "B" and he is the one talking.  I try to give the frequency time to show both sides.  If, though, there is someone on there I DO hear, and he is calling CQ or signing with someone else, then I feel free to call him.

In other words, be courteous, but not shy.  Go ahead - call CQ.  You might make the first call short, say, CQ CQ CQ DE CALL CALL CALL K and then if you WERE interfering with anyone, they'll be sure to let you know it! If so, QSY a bit.  If not, give a longer call next time.  And listen for the answers!

73
Ed
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KJ7XJ
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2004, 02:40:05 PM »

Thanks for the input! It didnt dawn on me to check the ARRL Bandplan...duh.. That is vey helpful. Now I can see the best places to get out a cq when the band opens in the next few days. Thanks!
                   Eric
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N8UZE
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2004, 10:19:40 PM »

Before calling CQ, ask if the frequency is in use by sending "QRL?".  That way even if one party in a QSO hears you, they can indicate it by replying "C" without really disrupting their on-going QSO.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2004, 08:21:48 PM »

Around 28.050 is a good place.

Most "DXing" and a great deal of the speed demon work is done below 28.025.  Traditionally, the QRP ops hang out higher up in the bands so they won't get trampled, and for several years by convention once you get above about 30 kHz in from the bottom end of the 80-40-20-15-10 meter bands, you're in Safe Harbor for operating with low power, or more slowly, or whatever.

The Novice subband starts at 28.100, so some slower activity is found just above that frequency.

Of course, 10m has become such a "daytime only" band with limited propagation compared with just a year or two ago, that 40m is a better place to find CW contacts, 24 hours a day!

WB2WIK/6
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KJ7XJ
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2004, 09:00:32 PM »

Thanks WIK! I know you've probably operated there once or twice... 40 is fun, but I have a thing about 10 during the day. I dont know what it is. Ive only been  licensed throught 2 solar cycles, but when theres a peak, I love 10 even more! Ive always been into FM and now I want to play with CW at the low end. Trouble is my speed is not great. Ill keep practicing though....Eric
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K7VO
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Posts: 1010




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« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2004, 05:39:04 PM »

Don't give up on 10 at night either.  Springtime means Es propogation (short skip), with openings around the USA and into South America quite common.

73,
Caity
K7VO
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