Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Was it me, or was there a lot of......  (Read 5529 times)
KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 2081




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2011, 04:01:34 PM »

I can't even figure out how you come to these conclusions.

How can the Op listen for a call that the DX station never sends???
I hear these guys saying "KD8XXX 59" and they don't even seem to wait for the return report before they move on to the next station. I often hear guys after the exchange asking "Whats your call" and the mob of people just drown them out and the DX station does not even seem to care he just moves on to the next person.

How am I supposed to find him by "Listening up" when I can't even hear the stations talking to him?  I don't know about you, but I have worked Middle eastern countries who are primarily working Russia and Europe and I don't hear one of those EU stations but I do hear the guy in Middle east 45-55 and it's very frustrating when he says "Listening up" and I have no clue if my +5 KC screams are even on the right freq.

And yes, it is the Dx stations that are getting Lazy Angry
In the never ending Quest to do more and more contacts per minute they now leave off the little things like Giving out their Calls, saying what freq they are listening on and even waiting too hear their report.

And BTW when I say DX most of the times it's DXpeditions that show this kind of behaviour.

In regards to posting SSB Calls I find the same problem and it gets magnified by the fact that the DX stations seem to be getting lazy. Of late I hear ops go through 10-20 contacts before giving out their call, simply because they expect people to use the cluster.

No, they expect ops to listen for their callsign.

Then there's the other annoying problem of Op saying "Listening UP!" now what the heck does that mean?

It means you're supposed to determine their operating pattern by listening to the QSOs they make -- ideally, before you start calling.

Yes we can assume 5KHz but if your that Lazy Angry

If you're making the assumption, it's not the DX station that's lazy...

« Last Edit: October 28, 2011, 04:21:07 PM by KD8MJR » Logged
AA6YQ
Member

Posts: 1551


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2011, 04:35:01 PM »

I can't even figure out how you come to these conclusions.

Those conclusions come from 21+ years of DXing.

How can the Op listen for a call that the DX station never sends???
I hear these guys saying "KD8XXX 59" and they don't even seem to wait for the return report before they move on to the next station. I often hear guys after the exchange asking "Whats your call" and the mob of people just drown them out and the DX station does not even seem to care he just moves on to the next person.

There are a few offenders, but in my experience most DX stations working a pileup give their callsign at least once every 5 minutes.

How am I supposed to find him by "Listening up" when I can't even hear the stations talking to him?  I don't know about you, but I have worked Middle eastern countries who are primarily working Russia and Europe and I don't hear one of those EU stations but I do hear the guy in Middle east 45-55 and it's very frustrating when he says "Listening up" and I have no clue if my +5 KC screams are even on the right freq.

As I posted previously, if you can't hear the callers, then knowing whether the DX station is working "up 1" or "up 3" likely won't help you much; you'll be calling blind, and that produces QRM, not QSOs. Improving your RX antenna might be a step worth taking.

Logged
N4UM
Member

Posts: 455




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2011, 07:30:53 PM »

If what goes on the clusters bothers and upsets you...don't use them.  It's like 75 meters.  Nobody makes you listen to that crap.
Logged
W2IRT
Member

Posts: 2610


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2011, 07:37:12 PM »

How am I supposed to find him by "Listening up" when I can't even hear the stations talking to him?  I don't know about you, but I have worked Middle eastern countries who are primarily working Russia and Europe and I don't hear one of those EU stations but I do hear the guy in Middle east 45-55 and it's very frustrating when he says "Listening up" and I have no clue if my +5 KC screams are even on the right freq.

That's where having a good antenna system comes in a lot of the time. If you've only got a low-hanging wire or a small 2-element at 25' up you're not going to hear what I hear on a bigger yagi at 75', and I'm not going to hear a lot of what W3LPL's station is hearing and putting out on the cluster. The more steel and aluminum you have in the air the easier it is to hear the station working the DX. Plain and simple.

There are many occasions (especially on 10 and 12m) where I can't hear the other callers and I take my best guess. Sometimes (often, actually) I'm in the right ballpark. Other times I'll call forever and not make it through. Sometimes I'll get lucky and someone posts a QSX to the cluster and I zip my 2nd VFO up there and call and get it. But it really comes down to experience and antennas, not necessarily in that order.
Logged

www.facebook.com/W2IRT
Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2011, 04:30:29 PM »

Today XV1X is on 28038 requesting UP and NA. From what I can tell, there is another operation down a couple kc's.

It can indeed be "fun" when pileups overlap. I don't hear it often but it happens. I'm on the XV now (beam long-path for him - 2 S-points stronger here in NJ, BTW) and his working frequency is perfectly clear. Not a peep, even when I worked him, which is unusual, HI.

Heard it alot this weekend on the SSB contest. Not split ops but pileups basically merging into one horrendous wide noise. Problem was that the rate of the pileups differed enough that one was clobbering the other and vice versa, with every once in a while a gap at the right time.

On topic, the condition the clusters show today about mis-read calls and such by those possibly in-experienced as CW ops should make you wonder what it would have been like back in the day before clusters if a cluster had been available and we old timers, as newbies, could have posted to it. I'm sure I would have screwed the pooch more times than I would want to remember. This in no way excuses intentional wrong postings. I'm sure there is a special place in hell for those and other miscreants of ham radio, especially the 'on DX freq tuner uppers'. God I hate those types!!!!

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
W2IRT
Member

Posts: 2610


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2011, 08:14:36 PM »


Heard it alot this weekend on the SSB contest. Not split ops but pileups basically merging into one horrendous wide noise. Problem was that the rate of the pileups differed enough that one was clobbering the other and vice versa, with every once in a while a gap at the right time.

There's a method to reducing this problem. Use these methods, in this order. Turn off your internal preamp, pad down 6, 12 or 18dB when necessary, bring the RF gain down and ride the volume control. The only times its really necessary to do all of these things during an SSB contest is late-afternoon on 20 and early evening on 40. The bigger and better your antennas the louder the QRMing signals will be, too, and that loud eastern-European cretin with his processor cranked up to 11 (and his amp cranked up to 8000) will be 60-over instead of just S9, 1.5 kHz away!
Logged

www.facebook.com/W2IRT
Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2011, 10:08:29 PM »

Not sure that would have helped in this instance. The pileups I am referring too were about 1 to 1.5 Kc apart and equally strong. It was just ugly!

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
W2IRT
Member

Posts: 2610


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2011, 12:26:44 AM »

Not sure that would have helped in this instance. The pileups I am referring too were about 1 to 1.5 Kc apart and equally strong. It was just ugly!

Oh, it works; it's just very slow-going, and you need a very good receiver to pull it off successfully. Your rate goes down the crapper, but if you really need to dig out a mult, that's the way to do it. 40m SSB in our evening is the worst, although it's nowhere near as bad as it used to be before Europe got to use 7100-7200. That's the one band I refuse to try and run on in CQWW with the station I got.
Logged

www.facebook.com/W2IRT
Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
KC3JV
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: November 03, 2011, 05:27:42 PM »

I appreciate your point of view.   Some people are really good at CW and some will never be.   I was one of those who despite a lot of practice was never very good at it.   I became an extra class when the rules were changed to 13 WPM.  I  do not operate CW at all because I could never get good with a paddle and could only use a straight key.  To those of you that are good at CW please enjoy it but don't tell people they are not a real HAM because they are not good at CW. I am now enjoying PSK31 and the ease with which I can communicate.

Mark KC3JV
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!