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Author Topic: How to convert a cb into a ten meter rig?  (Read 10439 times)
AA4PB
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« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2011, 10:05:28 AM »

You would think that a single sideband rig would cost about half as much as a double sideband rig  Huh
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AE4RV
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« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2011, 01:44:47 PM »

Suppressing carriers isn't free, man.
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W0GXA
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« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2011, 10:20:20 PM »

years ago, i converted a Midland CB to 10 m AM by replacing 6 crystals.  This was a radio from the early 70's.  In our area, 2 MHz above the CB channel is where you move to... so it was a simple math problem. 
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KD6KWZ
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« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2011, 01:22:07 PM »

There is a Yahoo Group about converting CB's to Ham bands. Some CB are not hard to convert, others need major re-engineering.

Something like a used RS HTX-10 would be a better use of your resources.
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K3WEC
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« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2011, 08:33:22 AM »

years ago, i converted a Midland CB to 10 m AM by replacing 6 crystals.  This was a radio from the early 70's.  In our area, 2 MHz above the CB channel is where you move to... so it was a simple math problem. 

I am doing this right now on an old 23 channel CB, for 10m beacon purposes, with the great help of WJ5O.  He is the region 2 beacon coordinator. 
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W5RKL
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« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2011, 10:08:00 AM »

I recently converted a Johnson Viking Messenger One to 29.0Mhz plate modulated AM. It was easy, took about 30 minutes to an hour with the proper crystals.
Power output is 8 watts into a 50 ohm load. The factory service manual should be used, available on cbtricks.com, when performing the modification to ensure the adjustments are done properly.

I'm current working on eliminating the crystals by using N3ZI's DDS VFO with digital display along with a buffer/amplifier between the VFO and the receiver's mixer and final amplifier's input tank circuit.
So far it's in the experimental stages but I hope to have it working soon.

This has been a fun project and operating low power on 29.0Mhz is a challenge but then again operating low power has always been a challenge so this is no different. I've worked into New England
from the mid west using 8 watts and a simple 10 meter antenna. Receiver sensitivity is quite good, quite often I hear Europeans quite well. Yesterday M5AFD was quite strong around 8AM CT. I also
heard Spain later on as well. My antenna is not the best for 10 meters but that's going to change once I get my 3 element yagi up.

Most older vacuum tube 11 meter transceivers such as the Lafayette HE-20 series can be put on 10 meter AM at 29.0Mhz quite easily. The crystal phasing rigs such as the Regency Imperial and Regency Range Gain can be put on 10 meters by replacing the crystals and retuning the oscillator and mixer coils for peak 10 meter signals. The final amplifier has variable caps, one on the front panel and one on the side adjustable by a screw driver, to peak the final amplifier on 10 meters.

But, to each his/her own.

73s
Mike
W5RKL
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AA4PB
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« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2011, 10:36:17 AM »

The owners manual says it is a Am transmitter I would like to get it to do ssb.
thanks and 73's
Ki4shr

That's the kicker. Changing the frequency to 10M isn't the issue. Converting it from AM to SSB is.
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AE6ZW
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« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2011, 03:01:58 AM »

my idea came that I was looking schematic of Midland 1001 Z CB radio, and I have noticed, they use same crystal for 2nd L.O. and for PLL reference freq.  by  adding another crystal OSC circuit of same frequency for 2nd L.O. and changing only PLL ref crystal, it may be possible to move up from CB freq. to 10 mtr or move down to 12 or even 15 mtr band.  of cause they require retuning and possibly changing parts of front end, amplifier stages, final amp, low pass filter, etc.  it is just my thought of conversion, I have not done it, it is just idea.
here is the web site I found schematic of Midland 1001 Z
http://www.cbtricks.com/radios/midland/1001Z/index.htm
« Last Edit: November 25, 2011, 07:41:30 PM by AE6ZW » Logged
W5RKL
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« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2011, 06:52:26 AM »

my idea came that I was looking schematic of Midland 1001 Z CB radio, and I have noticed, they use same crystal for 2nd L.O. and for PLL reference freq.  by  adding another crystal OSC circuit of same frequency for 2nd L.O. and changing only PLL ref crystal, it may be possible to move up from CB freq. to 10 mtr or move down to 12 or even 15 mtr band.  of cause they require retuning and possibly changing parts of front end, amplifier stages, final amp, low pass filter, etc.  it is just my thought of conversion, I have not done it, it is just idea.

That is not necessarily true. Quite often by simply changing the PLL reference oscillator, especially in modern day 11 meter transceivers, can result in the PLL's "PD" (Phase Detector), setting the PLL to "Unlock". This will result in no receive and no transmit.

What PLL chip is in the Midland 1001Z transceiver? I suspect the PLL chip in the Midland 1001Z transceiver is one that will not allow you to modify the transceiver for operation on 10 meters.

Modern PLL chips have circuitry that prevents changes to be made that results in operation on "illegal" frequencies outside of the normal 11 meter band. When changes are made to the modern PLL circuit, the PD (Phase Detector) detects the "illegal" frequency error and the PD unit of the PLL circuit sets up the "unlock" state then turns the VCO (Voltage Control Oscillator) "OFF" that results in no transmit and no receive. I doubt you will be able to modify the Midland 1001Z transceiver to operate on 10 or any other ham band.

The term "illegal" refers operation on frequencies "outside" of or any frequency not determined to be a "legal" channel frequency in the 11 meter channel frequencies, 1 to 40. As far as the PLL is concerned, any frequency that does not fall within the normal 11 meter channelization, channels 1 to 40, is "illegal" so the PLL chip through the operation of the PD circuit, shuts the transceiver down, again, no transmit and no receive.

One more thing. Simply changing a PLL chips reference oscillator can and will affect the local oscillator IF injection frequency which can lead to loss of receive as well as transmit. Simply adjusting the IF transformers thinking this will "compensate" for local oscillator IF frequency error, will not work. There is more to a PLL reference crystal than meets the eye.

Mike
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 06:57:47 AM by W5RKL » Logged
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