Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Astatic D-104 mic troubleshooting  (Read 2837 times)
KD0EXQ
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« on: November 14, 2011, 03:45:24 PM »

Picked up a nice clean Astatic mic D-104 with a "G" (nonamphlified) base.  Has the correct 4-pin connector for my Kenwood TS-520.  When I press the switch it "trips" the transmitter, but when I talk I see no movement on the S meter and I am not getting any returns to my calls. Did some reading on this site and other sites and checked the writing in the base with a wiring diagram -- it appears to be correct.

Question:  Where do I go next?  Should I take the head apart and see if everything is OK there? What would I be looking for? Took the cover off the head and saw the felt-like substance and did not delve any further.  Straight cable is secure in the 4-pin connector and have not pulled it apart to see if all the contacts are good/solid.

Appreciate any suggestions.
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4820




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 04:32:49 PM »

Fairly easy to troubleshoot. If it does not have an amplified base, it is likely one of 3 things:

1. Bad mic element

2. Bad keyer contacts

3. The base is not painted a green hammertone like this http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd78/yankees_1996/IMG_2075.jpg

 
Logged
K2OWK
Member

Posts: 1077




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 08:45:43 PM »

Like  N4NYY says "fairly easy to troubleshoot". I have restored two of these mikes (both have the amplified base). I test the mikes with an audio amplifier. This is an easy way to test the element and the squeeze to talk switch. I would remove the head ( very easy 4 screws). Check the element by connecting the element directly to a plug and to an audio amp. This will tell you if the element is good or not. Remove the head from the stand and check the plug connection. With the head removed you can also check that there is continuity between the element and the transmitter plug when the bar is squeezed. If all connections are there you can assume the element is bad. A new element can be bought for a reasonable price on many EBay sites, if you need one.

Hope this helps. Let us know how you make out with this mike.

73s

K2OWK
Logged
KD0EXQ
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 08:51:07 PM »

Thanks for the replies.  Will be checking out those suggestions.
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4820




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2011, 08:56:40 PM »

That mic had one serious flaw. The head to to easily interchangeable. That meant that people with a several of these would start changing out heads, at the first sign of something not sounding right. I know because I had a friend like this. That guy ruined all his mics buy doing that.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!