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Author Topic: What was your first shortwave radio?  (Read 138748 times)
KD8IIC
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Posts: 161




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« Reply #105 on: March 18, 2014, 10:28:53 PM »

 Best ever is always whatever I used first for anything I've experienced in life. The first ever actual radio to tune other than AM or FM broadcast was a Norelco Electronics Trainer. My father got it for me as a gift for raising my mathematics grade during elementary school. It was a breadboard arrangement using spring loaded clips to secure the components.
 Dad and I built one or two rudimentary devices with it. But the absolute best was the Trawler Band Radio one could assemble.As soon as it was finished I had it in the attic bedroom of mine, hooked to a wire as long as the house's attic ceiling and promptly was receiving Radio Havana. WOW, what a thrill it was indeed!Don't recall a single kit being made on that trainer after that.
 Next favorite has to be the old second hand Hallicrafters S-53 with which I showed dad how it worked. He wasn't into radios as such, him being a fledgling private pilot, but he was always interested in what the kid was up to.That S-53 was a fun rig to learn with. I listened to New York Radio's terminal forecasts. I still remember the guy's voice on that, he sounded exactly like the police dispatcher on the Blue's Brothers movie, remember?  Smiley
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KB0XR
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Posts: 41




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« Reply #106 on: March 19, 2014, 07:24:11 AM »

Hallicrafters S38DB my folks bought me at the Navy exchange in Alameda California in 1958.  It's on a shelf out in the garage right now.  Filter cap has long since dried up and missing a couple of knobs.  I sure had fun with it til 1960 when my mother bought me  a Hallicrafters SX 110.  That one fell off the bench in my garage and exploded into pieces.

I have modern shack now but still miss the old stuff.
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HFCRUSR
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« Reply #107 on: March 19, 2014, 08:36:08 AM »

Hallicrafters S38DB my folks bought me at the Navy exchange in Alameda California in 1958.  It's on a shelf out in the garage right now.  Filter cap has long since dried up and missing a couple of knobs.  I sure had fun with it til 1960 when my mother bought me  a Hallicrafters SX 110.  That one fell off the bench in my garage and exploded into pieces.

I have modern shack now but still miss the old stuff.
Fix her up and get her on a wire Smiley you just happened to post your S-38 in, of all posts in this thread-post#38 Cheesy
far as this lifelong radio geek, I first got a good sense of SWL on my grandma's Grundig Majestic console that was running off a TV aereal on her roof.
My 1st official SW radio is  my '64 Zenith Royal 3000-1 that my uncle Joe gave to me. It still runs great. I kept it in the living room till last month. It now sets at bedside and occupies one of the terminals on the Delta-4 to the 75' on my roof-and does very well on that big wire for what it is. Zero imaging/overload on HF. I'm a lucky guy to have it.
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W5CEM
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« Reply #108 on: March 21, 2014, 08:48:00 PM »

Realistic DX-160!  I don't have a clue what happened to it. 



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F4GFT
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #109 on: March 30, 2014, 06:52:30 AM »

Sony ICF-SW7600D. Even by today's standards a very respectable radio.
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N2LXM
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Posts: 75




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« Reply #110 on: March 30, 2014, 09:26:29 AM »

I started out with a BC-455( 6-9.1 KC) Command set, then on to a National NC-57B, sold it to help pay for my next receiver. After High School an Hammarlund SP-600-JX. Now I am using a Radio Shack DX-394( nice for its presets), R-390/urr, and a Collins 75S-3C fully filtered out. Each has its strong points. I have gotten a National NC-57B and NC-57M, there are waiting to be will be restored and given a place on my operating desk when done. Still a lot to listen to out there. Enjoy some of our home grown Short Wave station. take a listen a 7.490Mhz. Good and Funny stuff.
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WA8QNN
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« Reply #111 on: April 02, 2014, 04:52:45 PM »

A Hallicrafters s-108 was my first sw receiver. Boy that was a cool rcvr.

Larry WA8QNN
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K4PIH
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« Reply #112 on: April 03, 2014, 06:26:56 AM »

Hallicrafters S40-B. I also had an Allied/Knight kit Super regen Span Master that my Uncle had started to build but didn't finish and re-gifted it to me. Man that thing was a mess but my dad helped me fix unk's mistakes and replace some of the parts that unk had "misplaced" with suitable subs. Wish I had that thing back, it was hot!

We had some converted ARC-3 and ARC-5 surplus gear in the home shack.
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RAYLAIB
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« Reply #113 on: April 05, 2014, 11:29:32 AM »

1st - Heathkit regen with rotary dial.  2nd - Lafayette Star Roamer.
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K7HZN
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« Reply #114 on: April 11, 2014, 04:37:14 PM »

Hallcrafters S-53A that I ordered from the Sears catalog 60 of so years ago. It still sits on the desk in my hamshack.   
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KA9HXD
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« Reply #115 on: April 12, 2014, 09:49:47 AM »

In grade school back in the 60's I saved up lawn mowing money and eventually bought and built a Heathkit GR-64. It worked when I finished and I learned a lot in the process. Not a stellar performer by any measure. I had a long wire antenna from a previous crystal set kit. The ground was a piece of re-rod I beat into the ground along with a wire run to the well pipe. Those were the golden years of SW broadcast. I even set it up out in a tent during backyard camp outs in the summertime. I used to listen to local hams around the state on round table 75 meters AM on Sunday mornings. Built headphones out of old transistor radio speakers stuffed into hearing protectors. Great fun! Moved up to SB series receiver in high school. First ham rig was a HTX -100.
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HFCRUSR
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« Reply #116 on: April 12, 2014, 10:44:49 AM »

In grade school back in the 60's I saved up lawn mowing money and eventually bought and built a Heathkit GR-64. It worked when I finished and I learned a lot in the process. Not a stellar performer by any measure. I had a long wire antenna from a previous crystal set kit. The ground was a piece of re-rod I beat into the ground along with a wire run to the well pipe. Those were the golden years of SW broadcast. I even set it up out in a tent during backyard camp outs in the summertime. I used to listen to local hams around the state on round table 75 meters AM on Sunday mornings. Built headphones out of old transistor radio speakers stuffed into hearing protectors. Great fun! Moved up to SB series receiver in high school. First ham rig was a HTX -100.
This is cool^^^
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N1DVJ
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Posts: 530




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« Reply #117 on: April 15, 2014, 07:51:01 AM »

I was given (loaned) a Realistic DX-160 but I didn't really get into it.  Later I bought a DX-300.  It was the 'engineering sample' at Tandy and the thing was fantastic.  Oh, it had it's problems.  Difficult to set up and align.  And if you aligned it with battery power, on AC it could oscillate in the IF.  If you aligned it on AC, then on battery power it was weak.  I ended up doing a number of mods to it, most actually made it to the Radio Shack repair shops.  One that didn't was I pulled the power feed to the IF and put in a 78L05 regulator.  Then realigned on AC and the thing was sweet. 

I regret selling that radio to this day...

Use a WinRadio G305e now.
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N8AUC
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Posts: 79




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« Reply #118 on: April 15, 2014, 08:37:35 AM »

The first receiver that I could get my hands on that would receive SW, was an old portable radio that belonged to my mother. It received AM, FM, and 4-12 MHz SW. The dial was really cool looking. Slide rule tuning, but the numbers for each band were a different color on a black background. AM was red, SW was white, and FM was blue. It said "Admiral - Eleven Transistor" on the front. Couldn't hear a thing during the day on it, but at night I could hear foreign SWBC on it.
 
The first SW receiver that was MINE, was an old Hallicrafters S-120. Deaf as a post above 15 MHz, but on the lower freqs it received well, or so I thought. Used it to copy code on the Novice bands when I was studying for my first license. It was pretty decent for AM broadcast DXing as well.

AM broadcast DXing was always fun too. I had an old tube type RCA Victor clock radio next to my bed. I can remember lying in bed at night when I was about 12, and tuning down to the bottom end of the band, where I could hear a station broadcasting Montreal Expos baseball games in French. Later I found out that is was really a station in Montreal on 550 KHz I think.

Now, I use my Yaesu FT-857D to receive SW when I have the time to just listen around.
But the glow of those old tube receivers in my bedroom as a kid, listening to voices from faraway places, on cold snowy winter nights in Cleveland, was pure magic.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
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N1DVJ
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« Reply #119 on: April 15, 2014, 08:48:11 AM »

Well, if it's just using...  My grandmother had an old radio that I don't even remember what the name was.  It's like Bill Cosby talking about the old radio he listened to as a kid.  187 knobs and only two worked, the off-on volume control and the tuning knob. 

Later in college my girlfriends parents had an old Reed-Eisemann like that.  I always loved that radio, but I don't recall it ever working.  I don't know that they ever even plugged it in.  But it was just neat standing there in their living room...
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