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Author Topic: short wave listening as a hobby is finished.  (Read 118836 times)
ONAIR
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Posts: 2842




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« Reply #75 on: January 16, 2016, 06:25:05 PM »

And yes, unless you are meditating on Jesus 24/7 there's not much to listen to.
Ignore the SWBC stations and concentrate on the utes, clandestines, pirates, WEFAX feeds, experimenters...anything off the beaten path. There's a lot of interesting traffic to be found if you tune around a bit.

I miss the shortwave spectrum of my youth, and the nights spent in front of my DX-160 spent scouring the "Tropical Band" for new or unusual BC stations. Most are now gone - as is the '160 - but opportunities for listening enjoyment do pop up here and there.
   I still have my Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  I remember the nights listening to Radio Habana Cooba on 6,135 KILOCYCLOS!!!  Loved BCB DXing late evenings, and even listening to the kids in my neighborhood chatting on 27 mc. CB!!  It got my whole adventure in radio started.
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K9RZZ
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Posts: 35




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« Reply #76 on: January 17, 2016, 05:40:13 PM »

Like anything in life, it's what you make of it. My health has kept me nailed down at home recently, so I've been doing quite a bit of shortwave listening with my stock Icom R75 and simple wire antennas. Here's a clip I made of Transworld Radio out of Swaziland on 3,240khz the other night, I thought the African type music was very cool. Again, just 100 ft of wire up 15 feet. Just keep tuning!   Wink

https://soundcloud.com/k9rzz/3240khz-0310z-twr-swaziland-15jan16
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N4OI
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Posts: 282




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« Reply #77 on: January 21, 2016, 05:19:19 AM »

Like anything in life, it's what you make of it. My health has kept me nailed down at home recently, so I've been doing quite a bit of shortwave listening with my stock Icom R75 and simple wire antennas. Here's a clip I made of Transworld Radio out of Swaziland on 3,240khz the other night, I thought the African type music was very cool. Again, just 100 ft of wire up 15 feet. Just keep tuning!   Wink

https://soundcloud.com/k9rzz/3240khz-0310z-twr-swaziland-15jan16

Very good perspective on the hobby.  Also, nice audio clip -- the static just adds to the mystic!

73 ES GOD BLESS U ES URS DE KEN N4OI    Grin
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G7IDJ
Member

Posts: 1


WWW

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« Reply #78 on: September 12, 2016, 07:32:35 AM »

Hi Guys,

I had a go yesterday (Sunday) with my FT817, a small 10 dollar short wave radio and a Yaesu VX 3 to see what I can get to hear on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Recently I was often  disappointed by the constant indoctrination of CRI making me wish I was Chinese but to my surprise with a minimalist antenna, a tuning loop and a wonder wand antenna I managed to entertain myself for quite some time. Stations came through from the Middle East, from throughout Europe, VOA and of course CRI but they were not the only one's utilising SW. I have to say a Sundays seem to be much more interesting than weekdays.
I just had another go in the staff car park (Monday) and not a single station with a limited antenna other than QRM.
I think the answer is obviously a good antenna, some patience and possibly a focus on weekends.
I wonder whether other OMs noticed the same!
So SW not yet dead. If you keep listening and drop the odd broadcaster a "thank you" email,  I am sure they will stick around.
Mike G7IDJ/DL6MS

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AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1413




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« Reply #79 on: September 14, 2016, 04:08:05 PM »

I miss the shortwave spectrum of my youth, and the nights spent in front of my DX-160 spent scouring the "Tropical Band" for new or unusual BC stations. Most are now gone - as is the '160 - but opportunities for listening enjoyment do pop up here and there.
   I still have my Starlite A-120 (Hallicrafters S-120 clone).  I remember the nights listening to Radio Habana Cooba on 6,135 KILOCYCLOS!!!  Loved BCB DXing late evenings
[/quote]

This got me to thinking about my own SWLing days, late 1960s to early 80s, with some big gaps.   Havana made me remember that (IIRC) Radio Rebelde out of Cuba played Cuban music for the domestic audience--that was great music!  Other great music was "highlife music" on Africa Number One, and the local music on Radio Tahiti.  Lying at night listening to local ads from the Solomon Islands or a cricket match from New Zealand ...  Good times!
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AE5X
Member

Posts: 802




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« Reply #80 on: September 18, 2016, 07:10:13 AM »

However, I wonder, as many utilities have also finished, could any of the frequencies be allocated to hams? nobody else is using them and its a complete waste of the spectrum.

This is the last thing our hobby needs. We are dispersed enough as it is and these is so much HF spectrum available to us that we can't come close to using it. With more bands allocated, we'd tune far and wide to find activity - more so even than now.
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KC2QYM
Member

Posts: 724




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« Reply #81 on: September 19, 2016, 07:07:34 AM »

IMO, hams have very restricted HF spectrum....I like the idea of stretching out the bands for hams beyond the current limits...After all, most rigs are open a few hundred Khz either way already.  I know you can cut a diode here and there and open a radio to transmit throughout the range but why does the FCC allow the manufacturers to sell radios that have the capability beyond the band limits?
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KC2QYM
Member

Posts: 724




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« Reply #82 on: September 19, 2016, 07:11:01 AM »

IMO, hams have very restricted HF spectrum....I like the idea of stretching out the bands for hams beyond the current limits...After all, most rigs are open a few hundred Khz either way already.  I know you can cut a diode here and there and open a radio to transmit throughout the range but why does the FCC allow the manufacturers to sell radios that have the capability beyond the band limits?

In the more congested metropolitan areas of the US you experience extreme crowding on the active bands much of the time.  Just because rural/exburban hams have low noise levels and QRM doesn't mean that areas in denser population areas don't need spectrum relief.
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WD8DK
Member

Posts: 47




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« Reply #83 on: Today at 08:43:18 AM »

I have no problem listening to SW. I still hear much up here on the hill with the full size 135' dipole. I think a lot of people either don't know where to listen or have a less that adequate antenna system for SW.

I still hear number stations, WX broadcasts, odd digital and analog stations, broadcast stations and aircraft reports. Just my opinion. 
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