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Author Topic: ARE THERE STILL PLACES WHERE HAM LICENSES CAN BE BOUGHT W/O TEST  (Read 36526 times)
M0HCN
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Posts: 473




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« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2011, 04:46:03 PM »

No idea why the advanced test is only offered 6 times a year, where the foundation and intermediate papers are sent out at 2 weeks notice and those exams can be taken at the local club.
The difference with the advanced test is that scripts are returned and marked centrally, but it is multiple guess for gods sake, how hard can it be to mark the damn thing?

There is a UK advanced practice paper here: http://freespace.virgin.net/murray.g3kzb/QCSSpracpprs.htm (The one from the RCF is the real one) Pass mark is 60%, and the question pool is closed. You do get a copy of the license terms, a formula sheet (But the formulas are unlabeled) and (IIRC) a bandplan.

Folks do indeed do the US extra at the RSGB convention then flip it to a UK advanced, far more convenient (and cheaper!).  

Regards, Dan.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 04:52:08 PM by 2E0CHE » Logged
N2EY
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Posts: 3877




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« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2011, 06:02:32 PM »

I do not understand the whole pride in having a license thing, pride in being a good operator with a clean station I can see, pride in DXCC or whatever I can see (not something I am interested in, but it is a broad church), pride in having built some neat engineering I can see, but pride in having passed an easy test and gotten a callsign, not so much....

The tests didn't use to be that easy. 

BINGO!

The accomplishment level was/is different.

There was a time I was proud of being an extra class ham.  It meant that I passed a CW receiving test of 20 words per minute, plus passed several fairly difficult written exams. 

I did all that and a 20 wpm sending test, too. With a straight key.

Now it means I studied for a Saturday afternoon.

No, it doesn't. Your accomplishment is still what it was, back when you did it.

Here's an analogy:

The standard marathon is 26 miles 385 yards. I have done two of them and I can tell you that it is quite a long way to run all in one go. But a healthy person who trains for it can do a marathon. It's not easy but it can be done.

I am still proud of the accomplishment. If you have done a marathon, you know what I mean.

Now suppose the marathon distance were redefined as 5 miles. Running 5 miles is an accomplishment too, and something to be proud of. But it is not the same accomplishment as running a marathon.

Of course if the marathon distance were redefined as 5 miles there would still be folks who would run the 26 miles 385 yards. Theywould just call it something else.

73 de jim, N2EY
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AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2011, 07:38:55 PM »

No idea why the advanced test is only offered 6 times a year, where the foundation and intermediate papers are sent out at 2 weeks notice and those exams can be taken at the local club.

Thanks Dan for the link.  After a very cursory run-through of a sample exam, I'd say that this is the hardest ham test I've ever seen.  The hardest ham exam I've ever taken is the Canadian Advanced.  Even Industry Canada didn't pull punches like some of the baddies on this test.  The Extra is definitely easier, even if the pass rate is 75% for about the same number of questions.  I could probably wing a pass on the UK Advanced, but some of the questions are really nit-picky even for more experienced hams (almost 20 years here, including the solder burn scars).

Good luck on whatever exam you take, American, British, or otherwise. 

73, Jordan 
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 07:40:29 PM by AB2T » Logged
AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2011, 08:00:17 PM »

I do not understand the whole pride in having a license thing, pride in being a good operator with a clean station I can see, pride in DXCC or whatever I can see (not something I am interested in, but it is a broad church), pride in having built some neat engineering I can see, but pride in having passed an easy test and gotten a callsign, not so much....

The tests didn't use to be that easy.

BINGO!

The accomplishment level was/is different.

Have to agree with Dan.  I respect that some hams have a lot of their self-identity invested in passing the pre-1984 exams.  Pride in accomplishment is not necessarily egotism.  Still, I shy away from any self-promotion (some might say I have nothing to promote since I passed in the mid 1990's under the gaze of VEs, and not under the pre-1984 FCC system).  I'm just happy to be a ham.

It's okay for more experienced hams to perpetuate the exam pecking order (FCC Extras, then pre-2000 VEC Extras, the post-2000 VEC Extras, on down), but bragging rights aren't appropriate for new hams.  If we're going to get new hams in the hobby, it's important to present the licensing system without bias or prejudice.  Let's just focus on getting more people interested in the hobby.  

The best way to welcome new hams is to become a VE.  It's a shame that I was too young to be a VE when I passed all the exams.  By the time I was eligible, I was already off to school.  Maybe I'll finally get the certification, connect with a club, and start proctoring.  The only necessary gesture for a successful new ham or upgrading ham is a firm handshake and "Congrats, you passed". The rest is irrelevant.

73, Jordan    
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 08:02:43 PM by AB2T » Logged
K7NNG
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Posts: 42




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« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2011, 11:23:56 AM »

AFTER THE LOSS OF CW TESTING,, I UNDERSTAND "CRACKER JACKS" IS WHERE YOU CAN GO FOR A LICENSE..
I HAVE ALSO BEEN INFORMED BY EMAIL THAT "CORN FLAKES" IS ANOTHER GOOD PLACE TO FIND A LICENSE...
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2E0OZI
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Posts: 269




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« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2011, 02:25:47 AM »

Deep.  Roll Eyes

Yeah the UK Advanced Exam is the next one that I will be doing but in the meantime I am going to try and learn CW at least so as I can have a slow QSO. A friend of mine (ex British Army radioman ) is studying for it and finding it hard going, particularly the formulae etc...but I am sure he will get there. As you say there are some downright devious questions in there, as there were in the Intermeadiate.
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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
K7KBN
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« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2011, 11:57:00 AM »

Deep.  Roll Eyes

Yeah the UK Advanced Exam is the next one that I will be doing but in the meantime I am going to try and learn CW at least so as I can have a slow QSO. A friend of mine (ex British Army radioman ) is studying for it and finding it hard going, particularly the formulae etc...but I am sure he will get there. As you say there are some downright devious questions in there, as there were in the Intermeadiate.

Learn Morse code.  Then you can operate in the CW mode.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
2E0OZI
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Posts: 269




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« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2011, 07:48:13 AM »

Well I have 8 weeks off work with a serious injury so that should give me a start.  Wink
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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
M0HCN
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Posts: 473




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« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2011, 09:05:23 AM »

The thing about the advanced license is that basically all the licensing questions can be answered from the supplied copy of the license conditions, so it really degenerates into a Electronics & Radio theory test.

The earlier ones are far more concerned with the license conditions and such, where this one actually requires a little understanding rather then rote learning.
They do have a nasty tendency to play subtle word games which have little bearing on radio, and are somewhat fond of "which of the following is not true" which can easily be misread..... Not the nastiest multiple guess I have ever seen, but it comes close.

I took a practice paper under exam conditions last week (Going for the end of January sitting) and got 89%, so that is sorted.
I am also working on the CW thing, lcwo.net being my tool of choice, can practice anywhere.

Regards, Dan. 

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K3AN
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« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2011, 12:51:36 PM »

Although I wrote the following as a tongue-in-cheek April Fools article some years back, I think one day it will come to pass, probably in my lifetime. And I'm retired!

http://www.eham.net/articles/4953
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M0HCN
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Posts: 473




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« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2011, 05:16:48 PM »

Which would have 'interesting' implications for anyone under the new dispensation wanting to go on a DXpedition! I hardly see CEPT issuing reciprocal licenses to untested 'hams'!

Regards, Dan.
 
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AB2T
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Posts: 246




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« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2011, 05:14:04 AM »

You're right, Dan, after a mock test I've found that the UK Advanced is really hard!  By far this is the hardest ham exam I've ever seen, even after taking seven ham radio written exams in two countries.  This exam's kicking my a**.  Still, if I ever moved to Britain to work, I would still take the Advanced for the challenge.  Actually, it's good that I'm not doing well on the test.  It shows that I'm not quick with the reasoning that's needed for homebrewing and working in the shack.  Every ham test I've taken is an electronics refresher in some way.  

I have this stupid obsession with getting the full license in every country I study/work in.  Guess I'm a glutton for punishment.

Anyway, again, sure you'll do fine.

73, Jordan
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AE6ZW
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« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2011, 01:55:21 AM »

UK exam sort of remind of Japanese HAM exam, I think it is similar to advanced class exam in 1990 in US, when I took it. I like idea of having a schematic and drawing and question is about how it work.  such as questions like , what would happen if Capacitor C1 shorted or Resister R1 opened.  which is good trouble shooting knowledge.
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N6CTW
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« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2011, 12:41:51 PM »

I, myself, I had to EARN my license. The only way I got it, was to pay the pain to learn one the, that was CW. I recall the day that I took my novice license code test, I left their with a headache, a migraine headache, that stayed with me for three days. I PAID FOR MY LICENSE, but not with money, either!

Cliff, N6CTW (formally KD6OHB), Advance Class
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K7NNG
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Posts: 42




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« Reply #29 on: December 25, 2011, 12:50:19 PM »

We are a land of rules and laws.
Those that do not want to abide by those, need to get another hobby.
The new breed of Ham operators are, for the most part just plain lazy
and do not want to work for for education.
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