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Author Topic: A friend of mine stated the "woodpecker" is back.  (Read 8469 times)
AD6KA
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« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2011, 10:01:27 AM »

Quote
The West Coast system was mothballed as soon as it finished operational testing.
Our tax dollars at work!  Grin
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W5GNB
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Posts: 419




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« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2011, 10:10:17 AM »

I agree with K7KBN............. THE WOODPECKER would have spikes that clearly dominated mostly the 20-meter band with 60db +++ signal strength.  It also was a very distinctive Pop-Pop-Pop at about 10-pps and would have sort of a sweeping sound as the directional pattern was skewed around.  This was back in the 60's and early 70's.

Some companies actually made a "Woodpecker Filter" but I don't know how effective it may have been.  I was just a Poor Kid back then and could not afford one to check out. 

Let's hope that ORIGINAL WOODPECKER never returns !!!!!

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KG6YV
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« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2011, 01:42:05 PM »

During the bottom of cycle 23 2-3 years ago a woodpecker appeared on 75M here on the West Coast about 2-3 hrs before sunrise and stayed for about an hour or so.  During that period of time the MUF was dipping very low so there was no telling where on the planet the radar was located.  I have not encountered it in the last year or so.

FYI,

Greg
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K2DC
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« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2011, 06:08:15 AM »

I'm hearing a pulsed signal now (1400Z) on 17M that just completely wipes out everything from 18056 to 18082.  Solid S9, and a much higher pulse repetition rate than the old woodpecker.  I did some Google cruising the other day and ran across something on a French OTH radar called Nostradamus that is a pulsed system, and what I'm hearing now sounds very much like the recording of it I found on YouTube.

73,

Don, K2DC


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K2DC
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« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2011, 06:15:33 AM »

1415Z, and it just disappeared.

73,

Don, K2DC
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N8YX
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Posts: 118




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« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2011, 10:25:00 AM »

1415Z, and it just disappeared.

73,

Don, K2DC


It surrendered to your rig's noise blanker?
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G7MRV
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« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2011, 09:32:02 AM »


In the late 80's I made several trips to the USAF OTH transmit site in Moscow Maine (AN/FPS-118), and it was a monster. 


 

Would that be the three rectangular antenna fields that can be seen to the north of Moscow, Maine on google earth?
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KD6KWZ
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Posts: 276




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« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2011, 12:39:23 PM »

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Alright, which one o' you clowns was rebroadcasting recordings of the woodpecker...

I'll never tell, even *IF* I did know...

 Wink

Quote
a group of European hams formed the 'woodpecker hunters' with timing kit and pulsed transmitters of their own. I don't think they ever simulated multiple launches coming over the pole, but they could chase it off whatever band they wished to use.

You have to love that all HF transmit mod on those Old Drakes.

 Grin

Quote
I do think that sneaking someone into the control room of that reactor to doctor the controls was uncalled for no matter how much of a pain the thing was.

The sad thing is that the USSR was so secretive, that the crew manning that OTH system probably didn't know about Chernobyl until they evacuated Pripyat 2 days AFTER the explosion, & probably got stiff radiation doses then.

Someone made a crack about this:

http://thereifixedit.failblog.org/2011/06/24/white-trash-repairs-thanks-flatty/

like "Those days at Chernobyl were fun..."

What I read was that recording the woodpecker signal, then playing it back backwards, caused then to shift frequencies.
But, if WW3 had broke out, OTH radar & defense satellite links would be early targets. Just a few shots from the subs off
the coasts of both sides would do the trick.

Quote
Our tax dollars at work!

I worked for a defense contractor from 1984 to 1993. They were developing & pitching a number of new systems the last
few years there, some of them somewhat odd, just to keep going. I still wonder if PAVE PAWS is obsolete, even if it didn't
affect 70 cm use.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2011, 12:49:31 PM by KD6KWZ » Logged
K2DC
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« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2011, 11:15:48 PM »

For G7MRV - those three patches on Google Earth are the three transmt arrays, each covering its own 60 degree sector.  Somewhere near Columbia Falls ME you should find three similar, but larger patches.  Those are the three sectors of receive arrays.

73,

Don, K2DC
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G3RZP
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« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2011, 05:39:14 AM »

Isn't it PAVE PAWS that they have just updated to digital processing - with the result that the 70 cms repeaters have had to shut down? The repeaters didn't jam the radar when it had analogue processing, but they do now it has digital processing......which seems a retrograde step to spend millions of downgrading a system!
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K2DC
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« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2011, 06:21:28 AM »

Yes it was PAVE PAWS that received the processing upgrade - not downgrade.  It was, until recently, a state-of-the-art 1980 radar.  The improved porcessing significantly reduces the system noise floor, allowing detection of smaller targets at greater range.

And yes, it did result in the system becoming more susceptible to interference from 70 cm repeaters and the requirement that many of them reduce or discontinue operation.  But you have to remember - It was never our band to begin with.  In the US the primary allocation for 420-450 MHz is Radiolocation (radar), with Amateur operation allowed on a secondary basis.  That means they can intefere with us, but we can't interfere with them.

73,

Don, K2DC
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G3RZP
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« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2011, 11:54:07 AM »

Isn't it a down grade to have something that is more easily jammed? Especially by the evil minded with a few locally dropped transmitters?

The decision in the UK to use the 2.6 - 2.7 GHz range for cellular is causing problems with radars, too. Especially as some of them are not well designed, even though they are supposed to be fully ECCM equipped. But no RF filtering, a 500 MHz wide IF and a limiting amplifier is not a good way to handle even one jammer, let alone multiple ones....

Strangely, 430 to 440 is amateur primary in ITU Region 1, and I don't think that there is a country which doesn't actually have amateur operation on a national secondary basis! So the designation as a Primary allocation is almost as worthless as the Euro!
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2011, 11:50:42 PM »

Isn't it a down grade to have something that is more easily jammed? Especially by the evil minded with a few locally dropped transmitters?

The decision in the UK to use the 2.6 - 2.7 GHz range for cellular is causing problems with radars, too. Especially as some of them are not well designed, even though they are supposed to be fully ECCM equipped. But no RF filtering, a 500 MHz wide IF and a limiting amplifier is not a good way to handle even one jammer, let alone multiple ones....

Strangely, 430 to 440 is amateur primary in ITU Region 1, and I don't think that there is a country which doesn't actually have amateur operation on a national secondary basis! So the designation as a Primary allocation is almost as worthless as the Euro!

Very few technologies survive very long into a full fledged war.
These technologies are just ways of spending money so the budget is not downgraded in the next years allocations.
And the Euro is not worthless - it is great for turning poor countries into rich ones and rich ones into poor ones.
Ahh - socialism.
And don't even get me started on global warming!
Whatcha gonna do when the ice doth come!
Every 10,000 years Europe is under a mile of ice for 100,000 years - that was 11000 years ago.
Pass the blankets.

73s
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K8GU
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« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2011, 05:48:25 AM »

The Maine OTH-B site has been decommissioned sometime during the past five years or so and the transmitters were sent to Arecibo for scientific use.  They are not yet up and running.

I have been to the west coast OTH-B transmit site just east of Christmas Valley, Oregon.  It's very impressive although only the buildings, fences, and ground planes remain.  The transmitters, antennas, and all copper, have of course been removed.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2011, 05:59:47 AM »

Stayvertical,

It's rather interesting that during the Maunder Minimum (1640 to about 1740) not only were there no sunspots, but it was very cold everywhere. The ice on the River Thames in London was around 15 feet thick. The Middle Ages were somewhat warmer than now - they grew grapes in southern Sweden and oranges in the south of the UK.

I think that there's a bigger connection between solar activity and climate than many want to realise, although I'm told that there is a fair amount of work going on in Russia on that topic.
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