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Author Topic: CW filters for a Kenwood R-5000?  (Read 1235 times)
NL-6915
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Posts: 21




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« on: February 06, 2005, 03:45:26 PM »

Hello, all

I have a Kenwood R5000 receiver, and I have the following filters in it:  N=No filter installed, M1=YK-88S ssb filter, M2=IR-88H 4.0C filter and W=YK-88A-a AM filter.  Now I like chasing CW, but the sinals from neighboring stations is quite strong.  So after looking around, I know I need to install a CW filter in "N"....There are two flavors, I understand, a YK-88C-1 (500Hz CW filter) and also a YK-88CN (270Hz CW filter).  Which one would you guys recommend?  Also, another question.  The filter in M2 is the international radio IR-88H 4.0C.  I have no idea what kind of filter this is, it's not listed on the internet anywhere...But it does say 8830Khz on it, so that would make it even a wider filter than the 6Khz AM filter, right?  Maybe I should take that one out, to have both flavors of CW filters?  Any input from people with a R-5000 or similar Kenwood equipment is appreciated....

Thanks
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NI0C
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Posts: 2383




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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2005, 08:24:56 AM »

It is my understanding that the R-5000 receiver is much like (if not identical to) the receiver in the TS-440S transceiver, which I am familiar with.

The "8.83" refers to the 8.83 MHz IF frequency, not the bandwidth of the filter.  As far as CW bandwidth preference goes, that is a widely debated subject. I prefer lots of selectivity, myself. However, the Kenwood 270 Hz filter has a pretty poor shape factor, and for that reason you may be just as well off with the 500 Hz filter.  (Compare the bandwidths of the filters at the -60 DB points).  You might also find filters made by INRAD (International Radio) that have better characteristics than the Kenwood filters.

73,
Chuck  NI0C
 
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NL-6915
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2005, 08:48:28 AM »

Ok, thanks for the reply.  So if the 8830 Khz refers to the IF frequency, then what is the bandwidth of that IR-88?  Do you think it's an AM filter, SSB, or CW?

73
Mario
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NI0C
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Posts: 2383




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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2005, 09:39:21 AM »

I have no way of telling the bandwidth from what you've given (unless perhaps the 4.0 stands for 4 KHz, which would be a narrow AM filter or a wide SSB filter).  
You can probably estimate the bandwidth by tuning into various signals (AM, SSB, CW) and comparing how the signal sounds with the various filters switched in, one at a time.  
You can even rank the filters in bandwidth order by simply listening to their effects on the background noise (with an antenna connected). Generally, as the filters are narrowed, you should hear a reduction of bandwidth of the background noise, and perhaps even a lower s-meter reading on the noise.  
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NL-6915
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2005, 06:38:45 AM »

Yes..I have done some looking around, and the IR88H 4.0 seems to be a 4000Hz filter.  Not much different from the 6 Khz AM filter already in it, too.  What I will probably end up doing is taking the IR88H 4.o out, and put in two CW filters, one 270 HZ and one 500 HZ...Another question I have is about Trio/Kenwood YK-88 partnumbers....After reading about them, it seems that the 88 stands for the IF frequency, as you said above.  The C for CW, the S for ssb and the A for AM.  Makes sense.  I've also read, thought, that a dash one behind the partnumber is a later (or better) filter.  Is this true?  I have read that for example the YK-88A was garbage, and the YK-88A-1 was much better.  Is this true for the YK-88C versus the YK-88C-1 as well?

Many thanks, 73
Mario
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NI0C
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Posts: 2383




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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2005, 10:43:47 AM »

The dash number just means the filter is different in some way, not necessarily better.  Be sure to get the right part number for your radio; some Kenwood filters are designed to plug into sockets on the printed circuit board, while others with similar numbers are designed to be soldered in.  If I recall correctly, the filters in my TS-440S transceiver were solder in types (I never changed one).  I'm not sure about the R-5000 filters.

73,
Chuck  NI0C
 
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