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Author Topic: Are 30 meter beacons legal (or necessary)?  (Read 15331 times)
KB8TL
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Posts: 6




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« on: December 26, 2011, 01:05:48 PM »

There is a station (WA4SZE/B) on 10.126 transmitting a beacon composed of a two level carrier, supposedly sounds like an "n" or "a" depending on propagation.
What is the point besides using up valuable spectrum? You can check the 30 meter band's propagation on propnet.org and get a whole lot more information or check wwv.
Are 30 meter beacons even legal? 
Bob
KB8TL
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W7ETA
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Posts: 2527




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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2011, 02:15:34 PM »

David L Frantz, Jr
691 Brandon Rd
Manchester, TN 37355
United States

You could ask him.

Bob
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KD6KWZ
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Posts: 276




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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2011, 02:52:40 PM »

Good question. There's always WWV/WWVH on 10 MHz you can check to see 30 meter propagation. In the evening in this area, WWVH is strong, but WWV is weak. During the day, it's the other way around.

There's BPM in China, their radio time service:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BPM_%28time_service%29

That explains the odd beeps 1 seconds apart I could hear in the early morning here through WWV/WWVH QRM. They also transmit on 10 MHz.

Then, there's the SSB Aviation weather from New York on 10051 KHz. Here's a list of other VOLMET stations:

http://www.dxinfocentre.com/volmet.htm#10

Plus, you could listen to other stations on the 10005 - 10100KHz Aviation bands.

I won't debate the need for beacons, but 30 meters has plenty of other services you can judge propagation by.
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KS2G
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Posts: 428




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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2011, 06:56:40 PM »

>> Are 30 meter beacons even legal? 

It would appear not -- unless the control op is running in manually.

See § 97.203 (d) below



§ 97.203 Beacon station.

(a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be abeacon. A holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be the control operator of a beacon, subject to the privileges of the class of operator license held.

(b) A beacon must not concurrently transmit on more than 1 channel in the same amateur service frequency band, from the same station location.

(c) The transmitter power of a beacon must not exceed 100 W.

(d) A beacon may be automatically controlled while it is transmitting on the 28.20–28.30 MHz, 50.06–50.08 MHz, 144.275–144.300 MHz, 222.05–222.06 MHz or 432.300–432.400 MHz segments, or on the 33 cm and shorter wavelength bands.

(e) Before establishing an automatically controlled beacon in the National Radio Quiet Zone or before changing the transmitting frequency, transmitter power, antenna height or directivity, the station licensee must give written notification thereof to the Interference Office, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944.

   (1) The notification must include the geographical coordinates of the antenna, antenna ground elevation above mean sea level (AMSL), antenna center of radiation above ground level (AGL), antenna directivity, proposed frequency, type of emission, and transmitter power.

   (2) If an objection to the proposed operation is received by the FCC from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, WV, for itself or on behalf of the Naval Research Laboratory at Sugar Grove, Pendleton County, WV, within 20 days from the date of notification, the FCC will consider all aspects of the problem and take whatever action is deemed appropriate.

(f) A beacon must cease transmissions upon notification by a District Director that the station is operating improperly or causing undue interference to other operations. The beacon may not resume transmitting without prior approval of the District Director.

(g) A beacon may transmit one-way communications.
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AJ4RW
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Posts: 568




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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2011, 04:42:01 PM »

That was on my Santa wish list hi hi.  I contacted the ARRL about this station running this beacon and I was told that they had informed the FCC and was waiting a reply.  If you search google you will see there has been several complaints from amateurs about the WA4SZE beacon even as far as the west coast.  I live about 340 miles south from the physical address according to qrz and that beacon transmits a signal that I can’t filter out completely 1 kc away on either side during the day.  CW is impossible for me anywhere close to that frequency, 10 over 9 at times and my antenna is oriented east and west.  30 meters is a very narrow band so taking up 2 kcs is ridiculous.  You can file a complaint with the FCC besides what the ARRL is doing.
73 Randy
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KB8TL
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2011, 01:13:14 PM »

Randy,
Tnx for the advice, I hadn't thought of contacting the ARRL.
I submitted a complaint to the FCC at https://esupport.fcc.gov/ccmsforms/form2000.action?form_type=2000F and wrote a note to the ARRL.
Bob
KB8TL
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KD6KWZ
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Posts: 276




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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2011, 08:17:36 PM »

I'm not against beacons, but, yes, bandwidth is an issue. 10 meters has dozens of beacons, but it also has
a lot of bandwidth, compared to 30 meters. How do observe the ARRL warning about "avoid interference to
fixed services outside the US" with a beacon? You have to monitor the beacon signal 24/7, from a number
of places to comply with that, especially if propagation is good between a sensitive fixed service & the
beacon.

What if a non-fixed service complains about the beacon? When would the FCC pull the plug on 30 meters?
Granted, some countries allow more power, & even SSB on 30 meters, but that's up to the fixed services to
whine at foreign Amateur agencies.

I saw where Cayman Islands allows 1KW & SSB on 30 meters.
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WB8B
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2012, 03:43:48 PM »


An interesting note about this signal is that it is substantially wider than a pure single CW note! The signal does has a key-click type interference characteristic that I have measured anywhere from 1 to 1.6Khz in bandwidth, making it considerably annoying when trying to work anyone from 10125.3 to 10126.9 Mhz.

73
WB8Bob
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W2IBC
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Posts: 71




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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2012, 04:56:17 PM »

you think the beacon is bad.

try listing to the horrid audio on the SW station they have
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I AM THE VOICE OF THE VOICELESS!
N8YX
Member

Posts: 118




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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2012, 08:13:31 AM »

This "beacon" is supposedly being used as an experimental NavAid, not for propagation evaluation and monitoring purposes.

Draw your own conclusions.
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KB8TL
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2012, 04:48:49 PM »

The QRM / beacon is gone from 10.126 for a couple of days now, hopefully for good.
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K8CPA
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Posts: 34


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2012, 05:32:25 AM »

heard the beacon this morning @ 8:30 a.m. EST.

Was wondering about that. Shocked FCC had not sent him a violation notice.
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KB8TL
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 04:48:15 PM »

File a complaint with the FCC and the ARRL; I did, though I'm not sure it did any good...yet.
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KA1VHF
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2012, 05:43:53 AM »

The beacon in question is very loud into central Ohio.
I agree with other amateurs that the beacon serves no purpose
other than annoying users of 30 meters.
It is not a weak signal beacon.
I  contacted Mr Frantz directly and was not surprised by his
refusal to terminate beacon activity.
Appears Mr Frantz believes his experimentation has priority over
normal amateur use of the band.
I would urge amateurs to contact both the ARRL and FCC
if the beacon continues to cause issues.
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KB8TL
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2012, 06:55:43 PM »

Read info here: http://transition.fcc.gov/eb/AmaCmpl.html
All you need to do is send a bit of information in an email to the FCC.
Sooner or later, enough complaints will spur some action.
Bob
KB8TL


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