Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ? single or dual paddle  (Read 2767 times)
AF4XK
Member

Posts: 96




Ignore
« on: March 07, 2005, 03:50:21 PM »

Hello,

I've been sending code with a staight key and that's all I know (about 13-15 wpm). My elbow has been bothering me lately (glass arm, tennis elbow-not as young as i used to be) and I am considering trying a paddle and keyer.

 I am a KISS kind of person and am wondering if I should go with a dual paddle/iambic arrangement or a simpler single paddle (such a Kent SP-1). I think that I would find the single paddle more comfortable and could adjust to it easier. I also would like some day to use a bug.

Questions: Realizing this is very subjective, would you pro's recommend the dual/iambic (and learning iambic 'squeeze' keying) or the single paddle arrangement? Would the benefits of iambic outweigh the increased learning curve? Would there be that much difference in discomfort on the elbow between the two?

p.s. if i ever get to 20-25 wpm i'll be plenty happy as far as speed is concerned.

thanks.
chuck
af4xk
Logged
N7DM
Member

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2005, 04:08:28 PM »

By ALL means, Chuck... Take *the* plunge and become a Pure Iambic Op. It is a terribly hard thing to learn, from a Bug Op standpoint. But with nothing to Un-Learn, you should have it easier.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20603




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2005, 04:20:57 PM »

An advantage of the dual lever paddle is you can use it either way.  If you set up for non-iambic mode keying, then two levers or one doesn't make any difference, it all works the same -- and it all feels the same.  Your hand won't know if the key has two levers or one, because the "feel" is identical, if all you do is push the paddles left and right.

The only difference is, with a dual lever paddle, you can use "squeeze" keying if you wish to do so.  If you don't wish to, you don't have to.

If you've never used a keyer before, learning one or the other is about the same, and all it takes is practice.

Real iambic keying is a bit easier on your hand because it involves fewer movements.  

WB2WIK/6
Logged
N7DM
Member

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2005, 04:54:06 PM »

Those seven (7)  Iambic Letters...plus the  " . " and " / " really make a lot of difference. I am generally not a Crusader, but for Iambic... especially if the Op is not Bug [single paddle] contaminated... That is a Cause worth the hassle!  " C Q R F L K Y ".  Amazing how much they are in use! But timing is everything. If you are a Parkinson patient, or otherwise less than Normal on dexterity, Iambic is not for you.
Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2406




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2005, 08:06:10 AM »

You've gotten some good advice here, Chuck.  During the 1960's, I made the transitions from straight key to bugs, and on to single lever paddles.  For the past several years, I've been using an iambic key with single-lever techniques, and it works great for me.  In fact, several months ago I acquired a single lever paddle and had a chance to compare them side by side.  I send better with the iambic key.  Apparently, my fist has been adapting to take advantage of the twin levers (as well as the dot/dash memory of my keyer).  I'm not consciously even trying to use any "squeeze" techniques.  

The FISTS CW Club recently published an article analyzing the motions involved in sending each character with various types of keys.  

73,
Chuck  NI0C
Logged
N6PEH
Member

Posts: 104




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2005, 04:18:11 PM »

That FISTS article was very good.  It certainly establishes the iambic design as the more efficient.  That squeeze technique is really fun to play with too.
Logged
AF4XK
Member

Posts: 96




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2005, 03:29:34 PM »

well, guess you guys have convinced me to give iambic a try. i'll save my pennys and probably get a Logikit cmos4 and either a Begali simplex or a Kent TP1.

thanks for the advice.

also, could someone post that fist link? i went to the fist web page but could not locate it.

thanks again.

chuck
af4xk
Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2406




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2005, 06:47:17 PM »

Chuck,
The FISTS article appeared in "The Keynotes," combo issue 9/10, 2004, and was called "Using an Iambic Paddle."  The author is Chuck Adams, and it appears that he has the same article (as well as a lot of other good info) displayed on his website:
http://www.k7qo.net

73,
Chuck  NI0C
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20603




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2005, 10:30:05 AM »

You're going for a Begali or a Kent paddle?

That's really jumping in with both feet.

I'd go for a Bencher at 1/4 the cost and see how I liked it...

(...after 39 years of working CW pretty much every day, I still use my three Benchers and love them -- the three combined cost less than one Begali or Kent!)

73 & CU on CW

WB2WIK/6
Logged
AF4XK
Member

Posts: 96




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2005, 05:33:05 PM »

good point. I'll read the reviews on the Bencher. I'm going thru a divorce so a bit saved here or there means something.

Also I found the fist article on iambic sending.

thanks again.

chuck
af4xk
Logged
KC2FDQ
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2005, 05:55:53 PM »

This is a little off-topic for the single or dual paddle question, but:

Which side does the - go, vs the . ?

I learned it by myself, (I have a dual paddle Bencher keyer).  I learned - on left and . on right.  As I've been running the CW station during field day a few times, I've learned that apparently I've been doing it the wrong way!?

I know there is probably no "correct" way of doing the code with a keyer, but is there a more perfered way over another?
Logged
W4YA
Member

Posts: 317




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2005, 04:36:15 AM »

I assume that most people use the thumb for dots. But I don't think it really matters.
Logged
WA9FZB
Member

Posts: 171




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2005, 05:32:48 AM »

The "thumb for dots" convention is a carry-over from semi-automatic "bugs" that were all (AFAIK) that way.  There really isn't a "right" way, but this is the way that is most common.

Steve  WA9FZB
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2805




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2005, 07:16:11 AM »

We had a left-handed radioman on my ship back in the '60s.  He neatly solved the problem of sending with a bug by:

--turning the bug so the paddle was AWAY from him
--building a wooden armrest so he wouldn't touch the mechanism
--sending code with the "thumb makes dots" convention.

He could sustain 30+ WPM
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KB1LKR
Member

Posts: 1898




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2005, 07:15:40 PM »

Wouldn't a DPDT switch in the line to the keyer been an easier way to reverse it?
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!