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Author Topic: Most Improved Feature Over the Years?  (Read 10011 times)
K0JEG
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Posts: 658




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« Reply #45 on: January 21, 2012, 06:13:29 PM »

I like a real radio, but admit I'm in the process of building a softrock out of curiosity. 

One thing to consider - PC's as we know them today will also continue evolving.   That keyboard won't be there the way it is now.  Neither will the mouse.  Neither will the screen.   Neither will anything as we know now.   There is a convergence going on that will make these relics...and it won't be long before it happens.   The PC industry already sees it happening and is preparing.

And just look at what electronic musicians are doing with the iPad now. Everything from "sketch pads" for composing and practicing, to stomp boxes, drum machine docks and amplifier simulators. There are several companies introducing workstation docks that look a lot like the digital mixers of a few years ago, but with iPad interfaces.

Of course, most of these add-ons cost more than the iPad itself.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #46 on: January 22, 2012, 03:55:36 AM »

AXW,

$21560 in today's money for a transmitter! $3766 for the receiver - and they don't even transceive. So we are over $25k in today's money and we haven't bought a tower and antennas yet......

I figure that a good transceiver today, an amplifier, a tower, a Steppir and some wire antennas and a tuner and there would still be enough change from $25k for a steak dinner and a bottle of wine!

How much was a gallon of gas in 1953?
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3836




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« Reply #47 on: January 22, 2012, 09:36:57 AM »

Quote
Any way to join such a service as an amateur?

$0.20/gallon!  In 57, when I first got out of the service, I would spend $1.00 on a gallon of gas, a pack of cigarettes and take my girl out for a soda.  Things were bad then.  LOL.

Sometimes, as a "thought problem" I mentally assemble a virtual hamshack if money wasn't a  problem.  The amount of $25KB was right on the nose Peter! 

Never considered a steak dinner in the "thought problem."  :-)
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K0OD
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Posts: 2557




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« Reply #48 on: January 22, 2012, 11:00:35 AM »

With a huge number of young kids buying their first equipment then, selling receivers and transmitters separately made sense: receiver, then transmitter, crystals, antenna relay to replace the knife switch, VFO, maybe an add-on modulator, Q-multiplier, pre-selector. VHF stuff etc

No young ham was wanting for gift ideas from the parents. (get a job was the usual answer!)
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4572




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« Reply #49 on: January 23, 2012, 03:28:12 AM »

When we moved into this house back in 1986, part of the budgeting was for an 80 foot crank up tower, a 205BA 20 metre monoband 5 ele Yagi, a T2X rotator and the necessary coax and rotator cable, and 3.75 cubic yards of concrete. Figured on $7.5k, and spent about $4k, so there was enough over for a steak dinner! Concrete alone has gone up about 4 times since then.

Gas here now is about $2 a litre..........
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N2EY
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Posts: 3879




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« Reply #50 on: January 26, 2012, 09:54:59 AM »

RZP:  Roger that!  Take those prices and multiply them by 5.6 and you get "todays" dollar value.  I rest my case.

Actually, to relate 1953 prices to today, you'd multiply by about 8! (see Westegg Inflation Calculator)

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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« Reply #51 on: January 26, 2012, 10:01:09 AM »

Quote
Or compare the $250 HW-101 kit with what can be had for under $1400 today.


I see similar quotes like this on eHam.com quite often.  While the dollar comparison might be true, nobody mentions that the equivalent assembled transmitter/receiver/transceiver cost much more than this.

At this same 5.6:1 dollar ratio, a commercial transceiver "back then" would cost several thousand dollars. 

Living through this era I was able to buy an Heathkit SB-102 but buying a commercial transceiver of any brand or model at that time was completely out of the question.

So it came down to buying a Heathkit or doing without.  If today's $1400 radio was available back then for $250 then I would have bought it.

Good point! I used the Heathkit examples because they were the usually absolute rock-bottom prices then, if you were talking new stuff. Used could be had for somewhat less, but of course you took your chances.

IIRC, about the least expensive 5 HF band manufactured SSB transceiver back then was the National 200, which cost $369. That's over $2000 in today's money, and it didn't include the power supply, speaker, key or mike. IMHO the SB-101 or '102 was a better rig than the 200, too.

Other rigs were even more expensive....

73 de Jim, N2EY
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3836




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« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2012, 06:31:30 AM »

Quote
IMHO the SB-101 or '102 was a better rig than the 200, too.

Jim, I had no illusions about Heath gear.  However, when I transitioned from AM to SSB it was with the HW-22A 40m, single band transceiver.  The evening I finished assembling it, and adjusting it I broke a conversation between two guys in the same town in LA!  Got a great signal report. 

I also had great fun with the SB-102.  It had many shortcomings compared to the available commercial gear but I was in the game!
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