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Author Topic: learing the code with phrases  (Read 571 times)
KQ6ZW
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Posts: 2


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« on: March 25, 2005, 09:24:56 PM »

I was told by someone that there is a system of learning the letter of CW by using phrases that come from music.. like "here comes the bride" is Q (brides are queens)

and "A Hunting we will go" is another one...

Is there a complete list out there in internet-land?
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N0UY
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Posts: 158




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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2005, 04:55:33 AM »

Chris,
CW is music all by itself.  Remove the dits and dahs and just learn the sounds.  Obviously you've passed the 5 wpm but now it's better if you don't break it down and just here the music.

cul     ray
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2005, 06:30:09 AM »

If you learn it using such phrases, you will be limited in how much speed you can reach.  The limit would be somewhere around 10wpm.  To reach higher (much more useful) speeds, you would have to basically "start over" learning it letters directly as a sound.

Download the free G4FON software and follow the directions precisely.  This will help you get your code up in a reasonable length of time.

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K7KBN
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Posts: 2802




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« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2005, 05:07:26 PM »

The first time I ever heard of learning code that way was in the old book (later made into a couple of movies) "Cheaper by the Dozen".  In the book (the true story of a family back in the 1920s), the father is an "efficiency expert" who teaches his twelve children Morse code at the dinner table.  The only phrase I remember was that the letter "C" was "CAREless CHILdren".  

This is a self-limiting way to learn code: you hear "DAH di DAH dit", you then think "CAREless CHILdren", and then write down "C".  The idea should be to hear "DAH di DAH dit" and immediately write the "C" down without the extra step.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2005, 01:58:04 PM »

Horrible way to learn code, but it's worked for some people.

I remember the old Army Signal Corps code training manuals filled with this junk -- they stopped after several years, but they used this methodology for a while.  

The letter "L" was "the L with it!"  Easy one to remember if you're in the Army, I suppose....

WB2WIK/6
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KQ6ZW
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« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2005, 03:54:28 PM »

Thanks for the tips.. I'm going to go ahead with the Koch method, but I love the "the L with it" ... very memberable!
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2802




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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2005, 12:32:14 PM »

My High School electronics teacher (and Elmer) Chris Delzer, ex-K0OEI, ex-K7LBQ, taught me that the letter "Q" sounded like " Pay Day Today".  Unfortunately, there are no Q's in this phrase!
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2005, 03:17:16 PM »

The "pay day today" crap is from Code Quick, which I think is an absolutely horrible way to learn code.  It adds a step that's completely unnecessary and makes going fast an incredible chore.

And you're right, there's no "Q" in that statement.  The text tells you this harks back to Australia, and laborers being paid in Quid.  Now, what an interesting thing to have to remember in order to use code...!

There's no substitute for simply learning code by practicing it with a friend until it's so familiar there's no thinking involved -- just another language, and a very easy one at that.

WB2WIK/6
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3722




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« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2005, 04:48:50 PM »

Hi,

take a look at numorse

http://www.nu-ware.com/

Small fee to register the s/w after you try it out.

I don't have a lot of time to practice due to work schedules so this works for me.

BTW, when your at a traffice light, glance at the street signs and send the code in your head.
Same for the exit signs on the interstates or the
signs on delivery trucks.

73 james
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AB3BK
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2005, 07:47:54 PM »

I learned using the Code Quick phrases.  I don't think it makes another step.  You don't think about the phrases after a while.  It IS actually teaching you THE SOUND, it's just a sound that you are familiar with(words).  And, those phrases can be spoken as fast as any fist on CW.  The key to building speed is head copy.  The only way to do that is to listen alot without writing.  Eventually, it turns into "talking"

Dave
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 541




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« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2005, 07:36:23 AM »

 When we first learned to talk and understand as a child, we did not learn it by letter by letter. Why should Morse code be any different? We learned by sounds and phrases.

 Take the word "meter". If you were to hear it a few times at 25 wpm. Then... have someone mix that same word in random 25 wpm characters about 10 times in a period of say 5 minutes. Chances are pretty good that you would be able to pick out "meter" just about every time.

 If you were to hear just short snippets of your top 100 songs of all time ,  would you be able to pick them out pretty quickly? Chances are that you might.

 If you took the Top 100 CW phrases and words at 25 wpm. How long would it take you to learn all of them?

 Then you have half the QSO down, once you master those Top 100, then learn the Top 250. Learn how combinations sound like too. Learn combinations like W1, K1, WA1, KA2, at 25 wpm and so on.

 You need to really concentrate on what you are studying right? Maybe not.

 Why is it when you are listening to music on the radio, you can figure out the name song and the group who sang it pretty quickly? After all, you are not really concentrating ... are you? Nope  It just comes to you. Same thing with Morse code.
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Still using Windows XP Pro.
KC5BZA
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2005, 04:30:01 PM »

I am also looking for the list of words or phrases associated with Morse, and it it precisely because of the book Cheaper by the Dozen.  The four examples the father used are the only four letters I know down cold, and it does not slow me; I truly believe I hear it better.  I can pick a "C" out of a 20 wpm grouping with no problem.  If anyone ever finds the rest of the list (no dorky Army phrases, I want Gilbreth's list), please send it to me!!  I need to learn the rest of the alphabet!!  I've tried the tapes, the CD's, you name it.  Maybe it wouldn't work for everyone, but it would have worked for me.
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