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Author Topic: 10 meters CW observation  (Read 7458 times)
KD6KWZ
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Posts: 276




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« on: January 17, 2012, 09:04:48 PM »

I know a lot of the CW allocated portion of 10 meters between about 28150 to 28300 Khz is taken up with beacons, so calling CQ there would likely be ignored, but why do only 28010, 28020, & 28126 Khz seem to be the only places CW operators hang around there? I can send CQ in the other areas of the 10 CW portion, but no one is listening? I can make SSB QSO's so it's not my antenna at the major issue. And, I'm not fighting someone's digital transmissions on or near where I send 10 meter CW CQ's.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 12:07:10 AM by KD6KWZ » Logged
AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2012, 04:04:32 AM »

I just called up my logbook and checked my last five CW 10m QSOs:  28008, 28018, 28018, 28015, 28008.  That does look like a bit of clustering, but my data is different from yours.  Maybe if we have any statisticians on eham, we could send them our 10m CW data and see if there's anything significant in the data.  :-)

In the meantime, don't tell people how much fun 10m CW is.  Let's keep the DX to ourselves, OK?   Wink  Wink  Wink
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WX7G
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2012, 04:56:27 AM »

I find that on 10 meter CW it's usually DX-DX or DX-stateside QSO's. DX calls CQ and you answer. If you call CQ not much will happen.

So go find the DX and give them a call.
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K3STX
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 05:52:07 AM »

Most CW ops tend to hang out in the low parts of the bands because that is where others are listening! You are right, most guys call CQ below 28030 kc. Nobody scans up to 28125 just to find a CQer! But isn't the same thing true on 40 meters, most QSOs in the non-Extra portion occur between 7025-7050 kc. Cuz that is where people are listening to find someone CQing.

In the 10 meter contest there was no space to call CQ BELOW 28100, the band was so full. But why call CQ on 28050 on an empty band?

As to why you get no replies, as you know 10 meters if finicky, are you sure the band is open when you are calling CQ?

paul
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 09:23:16 AM »

I've never noticed this, at all.

Maybe you need a "bigger signal" to attract more attention and callers...

If there's no propagation (no beacons and other signs the band is simply closed) I don't bother with 10m and go lower in the spectrum; but if there is propagation and I call CQ on CW almost anywhere below about 28.030 or .035, I get answers.  I never take any notice of the frequency, just try to find a clear one.

During the 10m contest, there weren't any clear ones until late at night...and then there wasn't anything to work except locals. Cheesy
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W5ESE
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 10:19:56 AM »

In the ARRL 10m Contest, there was a significant amount of activity above 28100 KHz.

73
Scott
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N3QE
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Posts: 2422




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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 10:21:27 AM »

While 10M phone/FM has a lot of local and mobile users in most urban communities, these traditions simply do not exist, or barely exist, on 10M CW. Most CW users are going to be looking for DX.

That said, you ought to be able to strike up some conversational CW QSO's with JA pretty easy.

With regards to not-quite-local-but-not-quite DX CQ'ing, when 10M is open first skip zone is other side of the Mississippi :-)
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KD6KWZ
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2012, 08:34:31 PM »

When contests are going on, the bands used for the contest are a different world...    ... You have to go way up on 10 meters to get a clear spot for SSB. I been on during 2 different contests affecting 10 meters.

I was talking about when propagation is OK, I can work US stations 1,500 to 2,000 miles away on SSB 22 watts PEP, & I can hear US & Mexican beacons, even the 5 watt one in Mexico.

Quote
I call CQ on CW almost anywhere below about 28.030 or .035, I get answers.

That's my point, no one listens for CW on 28035 to 28150 KHz, about where the foreign beacons begin.

PJ4C was doing CW on 28017 today, listening 4 KHz up, I could copy him, but no luck in getting him.
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AC4RD
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2012, 04:16:56 AM »

PJ4C was doing CW on 28017 today, listening 4 KHz up, I could copy him, but no luck in getting him.

You'll get him if you keep trying.  The operators there are doing a great job; just hang in there and you'll get them for sure. 

I worked PJ4C last night on 15m CW; the band sounded pretty quiet except for the PJ4C pileup--and even that wasn't that big.  But it's fun to get in and work a pileup, and it was darned near all I heard on 15.    After that I went tuning around 15 some more and worked the C21HA group.  :-> 
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WA4FNG
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Posts: 162




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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2012, 09:03:50 PM »

I monitor the reverse beacon network on most bands, so if you're callig CW somewhere on 10m and can be heard by one of the monitoring stations - I'll find you. Lately, there hasn't been much activity on 10m except maybe some limited openings. I rarely call CW myself. 73, Milt
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2012, 02:18:41 AM »

I understand your point of view, and agree with some other comments that the reason most CW ops cluster is because that is where most of the contacts are being made.
It is normal for things to cluster, since this is a form of self organisation behaviour, which is very common in natural systems.
It is also a good strategy when stations are few, since it narrows the search space for contacts.

I am not judging whether it is an intrinsically good use of spectrum or any of those type of factors - it is really an optimisation strategy.

A similar situation occurs on other bands as well, such as 15m CW for example or other modes such as PSK31 where most stations sit on 14.070, with 14.072 being almost deserted.

When conditions are very good however, it is common to see the spread of stations expand greatly, since the extra space is needed for contacts and the "hunting" is easy as well, so it is not as necessary to optimise your search strategy.

73s
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K7CB
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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2012, 07:36:04 AM »

Honestly, I LIKE the fact that a lot of CW activity takes place at the low end of the band.  The way I see it - such operations help discourage illegal and unwanted operations at the low end of the band by "freebanders."  I don't really care that they're operating above or below the authorized CB channels.  I'll let the FCC worry about that.  But I do have a problem with them operating on bands/frequencies that I studied and tested to use.  I'll intentionally start calling on top of these operators in an attempt to get them to move off the band.  The way I see it - you can't be causing intentional interference to users who aren't supposed to be there in the first place.
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KD6KWZ
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Posts: 276




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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2012, 11:45:09 AM »

Quote
such operations help discourage illegal and unwanted operations at the low end of the band by "freebanders."

I've been hearing freebanders as high as 28350 KHz lately, well above the 24/7 beacon region. I would think using all of the 10 meter CW spectrum would be more discouraging to freebanders.
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K7CB
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Posts: 81




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« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2012, 12:19:42 PM »

I've been hearing freebanders as high as 28350 KHz lately, well above the 24/7 beacon region. I would think using all of the 10 meter CW spectrum would be more discouraging to freebanders.
Yes, you'll hear them higher...but I think the greatest amount will be found from 28.000 to 28.090 since most CBers simply have modified 40 channel CB radios and the PLLs in them usually only allow up to 28.085...28.090 with an open clarifier/voicelock control.
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