Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Furthest Reaching Commercial Stations  (Read 14725 times)
K3WEC
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« on: January 23, 2012, 06:31:09 PM »

Anyone know what the furthest reaching (in terms of listenership) English-speaking commercial stations are in the world?  I've tried googling but don't seem to find many statistics on how many folks are actually tuning in....
Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2151




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2012, 06:00:14 AM »

Voice of America or BBC or HCJB??

Dick  AD4U
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2521




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2012, 07:17:02 AM »

Quote
English-speaking commercial stations

Question is way too vague
Logged
K3WEC
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2012, 12:43:10 PM »

I've read that commercial stations are defined as those not run by governments nor religious non-profits.  I'm referring to those that allow advertisers, have a lineup of shows, music, etc. 
Logged
KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 76




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2012, 01:38:51 PM »

Does it have to be current?
 There are many stations that call themselves 'worldwide', but WLW Cincinnati boasted  500kw broadcast power back in 1934.
 It was short-lived because they clobbered so many other stations. They applied for but were denied a permit for an insane 750kw.
 At a half million watts, a nearby box spring mattress could become a detector.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WLW
Logged
N3PDT
Member

Posts: 75




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2012, 03:51:55 PM »

And, of course, Doc Brinkley and XERA should be in this discussion.

"WLW. Wherever people talked about AM broadcasting, these letters were magic. It was The Big One, The Nation's Station, Whole Lotta Watts, World's Largest Wireless, the only radio in the US with 500 kW. Brinkley, being Brinkley, knew he could do better. WLW, up in Ohio, was using an "experimental" license that had to be renewed every six months. Nobody had to experiment in Mexico. The good Doctor hired some of the same RCA engineers who'd learned on the Cincinnati supermachine, and asked them for a bigger one. The Mexican radio bureau granted the new call of XERA, and Doctor built the biggest damn radio in the world."

From: http://www.ominous-valve.com/xerf.html
Logged
W1ITT
Member

Posts: 145




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 03:19:17 PM »

Here in New England, in the FM broadcast band, WHOM on Mt. Washington in NH claims to have the widest  coverage of any FM station in the US.  There's one down in Sao Paolo Brazil that runs 80 kw into a gain antenna that would probably give them a run for their money, but I suspect much of the coverage area is jungle. Both antennas are Shivelys, tuned by yours truly.
But the question needs to be more specific as to band. 
Logged
KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 03:49:34 PM »

English speaking stations?Huh  Mine speaks Esperanto.

Allen
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1735




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2012, 11:51:20 AM »

Does it have to be current?
 There are many stations that call themselves 'worldwide', but WLW Cincinnati boasted  500kw broadcast power back in 1934.
 It was short-lived because they clobbered so many other stations. They applied for but were denied a permit for an insane 750kw.
 At a half million watts, a nearby box spring mattress could become a detector.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WLW
     Wasn't Radio Moscow using like megawatts?
Logged
W8MW
Member

Posts: 313




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2012, 07:39:45 AM »

I've tried googling but don't seem to find many statistics on how many folks are actually tuning in....

This is the critical variable that means life or death for a commercial broadcast station.  You won't find much meaningful listener data online because it's proprietary information collected by research companies (primarily Arbitron in the US) and sold to radio stations.

There was a time when flame throwing 50 KW AM stations thrived thanks to coverage patterns extending hundreds of miles beyond their city of license.  I worked at one such station in the early 70's, WAPE 690 AM in Jacksonville.  With big RF plus its antenna in a swamp just a little distance inland, the signal hugged 600 miles of east coast beach from Miami to Wilmington, NC. But as audience measurement methods became more sophisticated and businesses making advertising purchases became more demanding, stations with best ratings inside the local marketing zone started beating up the old regional monsters.  Now it's common to see local FM stations with limited coverage at the head of the pack with the big AM'ers bringing up the rear.

A consequence of this that's sad to consider:  many owners of high-power AM stations sought FCC authorization to reduce power so they can save on operating costs and in some cases so they can lease tower space as sources of extra income.  It's a different ball game in commercial broadcasting these days.  Glad to be out of it.

73, Mike
« Last Edit: February 09, 2012, 09:58:39 AM by W8MW » Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2151




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2012, 06:08:32 AM »

I've tried googling but don't seem to find many statistics on how many folks are actually tuning in....

There was a time when flame throwing 50 KW AM stations thrived thanks to coverage patterns extending hundreds of miles beyond their city of license.  I worked at one such station in the early 70's, WAPE 690 AM in Jacksonville.  With big RF plus its antenna in a swamp just a little distance inland, the signal hugged 600 miles of east coast beach from Miami to Wilmington, NC.

73, Mike


Ahhh The Big APE!   ARRRRRRRRH REEEEEEEEEE AHHHHHHHHHH!!  If you have to ask, then you never heard it.  You just brought back very fond memories of my younger (teen) years at Myrtle Beach, SC in the 1960's - my first real girl friend, my first real kiss, my first.....................well you get the picture.  The Big APE on 690 blared from every radio in every car cruising the strip at the beach.

Dick  AD4U
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 04:54:23 AM by AD4U » Logged
W8MW
Member

Posts: 313




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2012, 10:26:27 AM »

Hi Dick .. Thanks for sharing your memories of the Big Ape.  It was cool to listen to and also a cool place to work.  The 50 KW transmitter was homebrew and used water cooling from a swimming pool that was partially in front of and partially inside the building!  The Big Ape identity is now being used by an FM station in Jacksonville.  Wikipedia has an interesting article in their listing under WAPE (defunct).

73, Mike
Logged
K3NRX
Member

Posts: 1966


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2012, 10:15:25 AM »

KDKA-AM here in Pittsburgh has been heard as far away as Ireland....50K blow torch....got to love it!....

V
KA3NRX

Logged
K3WEC
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2012, 01:48:40 PM »

I noticed that several SW stations offer very low cost air time for talk shows or what have you.... some as little as $50 per hour.   That is the case for WBCQ, for instance, although I'm sure that rate is not prime-time.  Still, that's cheap no matter what.   It makes me wonder how many folks are actually listening if they can price airtime that low.
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3822




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2012, 06:49:28 AM »

There was a time when flame throwing 50 KW AM stations thrived thanks to coverage patterns extending hundreds of miles beyond their city of license.

Both the FCC and advertisers appreciated the big signal operations up through the 1960's.......... Prior to WW II radio was an expensive venture and heavily front loaded with costs. Many moderate sized towns had no local signals and if they did it was a weak daytime operation trying hard to stay ahead of their bills. The regional stations generally had the resources to be more useful during emergencies, could better fulfill their license obligation of operating in the public interest, convenience and necessity, and from an advertiser's perspective could deliver more ears at lower cost per impression than the locals. But..... There was no advantage to local advertisers as few would see any significant business come in from out of town.

The advertisers who benefited most from Big Signal AM were regional brands who had product for sale across the coverage area. You can advertise Coca-Cola or Campbell's soup on any station anywhere and there will be a local store selling it.

What killed radio advertising was (probably) Cable TV.

There are still plenty of 'burgs in this country too small to support a local radio station that do support cable and I can't think of any product that must be advertised on radio. Besides, if you think radio sales folks are willing to whore, talk to a cable rep.   Shocked

It's a different ball game in commercial broadcasting these days.  Glad to be out of it.

What used to be the flamethrower in town is still running 50 gallons but finally dropped their iBiquity sidebands........ I might be the only one glad to see it go, but it surprised me. Best guess is there was no point in offering (or trying to sell) Digital 1 / Digital 2 programming when almost no one could hear it.
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!