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Author Topic: Just got my last key  (Read 4114 times)
PA0KDW
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Posts: 26




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« on: February 08, 2012, 06:21:52 AM »

Today

I celebrate my last anniversary , (95)

I got my last key.

Happy with that and using it because due to blindness and nearly deaf, but still able to listen to 600 Hz, I still enjoy amateur radio.

However amateur radio is NOT what you guys think it is. Better my idea about amateur radio is not what you guys in majority made it.

For me amateur radio was CW nothing else, and designing and building all your equipment and antennas yourself.

That, guys, is stolen. It is nowadays a mass entertainment just as telephone or broadcast radio or television is.

I am sure you gained a lot in mass entertainment with your Japanese radio's, your kits and your purchased towers and antenna's but the creative excitement we (my passed away fellows and I) experienced in our youth is gone forever.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2012, 06:23:51 AM by PA0KDW » Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2406




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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2012, 09:36:49 AM »

Dear OM,

I read your notes on QRZ.com as well as your posting above.  Congratulations on your accomplishments in amateur radio, and I hope you wear out your new key. 

Some people call me an "old timer" because I've been licensed over 50 years; however you are from my father's generation, and still active.  I'm glad that you are still able to enjoy CW in spite of infirmities.  I salute you for that.

It is true, as you say-- the vast majority of us enjoy ham radio using manufactured or kit equipment.  I am certainly in this category.  However, I wish you could attend the home brew forums by the QRPARCI group that are held in Dayton, Ohio during May each year.  You would meet amateurs who are designing and building marvelous radios and ham accessories for the fun of it.  Your traditions live on, OM! 

The rest of us (the vast majority who do not design and build our own rigs) enjoy our operating (I would certainly not call it "mass entertainment"), and we learn a lot by assembling our stations with whatever skills we have.  Many of us continue to carry on the tradition of CW operations because we recognize the advantages in doing so. 

73,
Chuck  NI0C

 
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NR0U
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2012, 09:49:49 AM »

NI0C - Most excellent example of a classy reply.  FB and kudos to you.

73
Lance
K0URN
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NI0C
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Posts: 2406




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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2012, 02:55:41 PM »

Thanks Lance!
73 de Chuck  NI0C
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KF6ABU
Member

Posts: 351




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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2012, 06:52:34 PM »


However amateur radio is NOT what you guys think it is. Better my idea about amateur radio is not what you guys in majority made it.

For me amateur radio was CW nothing else, and designing and building all your equipment and antennas yourself.

That, guys, is stolen. It is nowadays a mass entertainment just as telephone or broadcast radio or television is.

I am sure you gained a lot in mass entertainment with your Japanese radio's, your kits and your purchased towers and antenna's but the creative excitement we (my passed away fellows and I) experienced in our youth is gone forever.

Your attitude won't be missed.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3860




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« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2012, 09:59:58 PM »

KDW:  I hear you!  First of all, congratulations on still being on the good side of the grass.  However, as hard as it is to deal with, things change with time.  I'm 76 years old and have been a ham for 55 years.  I've seen many changes.  Some changes I do not like either.  However, since most things continue to evolve regardless of my feelings, I've learned to go with the flow.  I continue to enjoy what I wish with amateur radio and try to ignore the rest.

As for your hearing.  I am almost totally deaf without hearing aids.  With hearing aids the sounds coming from a speaker or headphones is just so much trash.

I found a solution with an audio enhancer that I built from a QST article.  It is fairly simple and a PCB is available for a more simplified build.  With it, the noise is pretty well filtered out and with stereo headphones I can now enjoy SSB as well as my first love, CW.

If you need more information, please let me know.  The last thing you want to do is to start feeling sorry for yourself and becoming bitter.  Please try to deal with everything and continue using this wonderful hobby.

Al - K8AXW
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K8AG
Member

Posts: 352




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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2012, 09:32:43 AM »

I built my first rigs from scratch using articles in books and ARRL publications as guides.  I agree that much of that activity is gone.  But I think this is a case of hate the game, don't hate the player.

I have done a lot of technical writing in my job over the decades.  One thing I understand is that most technical people have a difficult time expressing ideas and understanding to those who don't already share their insight.  Trying to learn ham radio from literature written only for those who need little explanation is difficult.  Ham radio study materials, for the most part, are badly written with little flow from one subject to another, and little explanation of why a question might address something important.  Of course I understand the materials.  But as a 20 wpm FCC tested extra and former radio engineer, I already understand the material.

We need to push ARRL and the others to rework their study guides to make them more comprehensive and less tuner to the quick buck of getting more people their tickets.

Sorry for the rant.  73, JP, K8AG

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K8AXW
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Posts: 3860




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« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2012, 05:00:37 PM »

AG:  You nailed it!  I recall the first ARRL Antenna Handbook I bought.  By the time I got through it I came to the conclusion that NO antenna would work! 

While I have several ARRL Handbooks I feel that they are poorly written as well.  I understand that it's difficult to write for both the experienced and novice at the same time.

At the same time I feel that more simplified and/or practical explanations are needed.

I used to know an old and uneducated CB'r who could cobble stuff together and get amazing results.  I've often wished he could have written a book explaining how he did things.

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N8TI
Member

Posts: 115




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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2012, 07:07:00 PM »

There are a lot of facets to this hobby. We can spend time building, getting on the air or just discussing radio stuff on the internet. Let's face it, none of us is ever going to solder a couple of million transistors together to build some of the processors than are used in the radios we have now and the computers that operate some of them. Regardless, the thrill of contacting someone thousands of miles away with a signal you personally sent out is still there.

Joe  N8TI
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W1SFR
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2012, 09:50:15 AM »

Well, you might be heartened to know that there are still those of us out there that are very much captivated by home brew and CW. I'm just a "youngster" at 63, but I'm just getting into this fascinating hobby and I'm really looking forward to it. I share some of your concerns about the hobby as it progresses. I'm one that doesn't really get the point of using a computer to send (or receive) CW, but I certainly don't begrudge others from doing what feels right for them. I'm not experienced enough to scratch build anything, but I just finished building a 40M xcvr, an antenna tuner, a digital display and a wattmeter all from kits, and I have to tell you that turning them on and seeing them come to life holds all the excitement and mystery for me that yours did for you back in the day. And that's really what it's all about.

73
(taking my test next weekend!)
Steve
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OHR 100a QRP XCVR at 5W on 40M
TenTec Argosy 525
40M LNR ParEndFedz Antenna
AB9NZ
Member

Posts: 176




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« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2012, 11:38:01 AM »

  Yeah, I'm not too eager to lay the boots to this guy either. This dutchman's been through a couple of world wars and comes from a country with a deep maritime tradition, I value his (strong) opinion. A google search of his call will lead you to the HelleMonster website, the google translator is a little ruff, but it's pretty cool stuff. Take good care guys, Tom AB9NZ,  http://radiotelegrapher.posterous.com/
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K4AMA
Member

Posts: 6


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2012, 07:49:33 AM »

Your attitude won't be missed.

One of the most heartless and disrespectful things I have read in a very long time.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3860




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« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2012, 08:42:25 AM »

Quote
One of the most heartless and disrespectful things I have read in a very long time.
 

I'll drink to this!  I have nothing but TOTAL respect for the Dutch and after knowing them since after the war, I can sense that KDW feeling pretty low.....and it takes a hellova lot of trouble to get a Dutchman down!

KDW, I wish you the best and hope you continue to enjoy what you can of the hobby.  Regardless of the changes or the attitudes, ham radio is still the greatest hobby in the world and continues to be the one that bridges all countries of the world.
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