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Author Topic: "Get on the air!" -- Thanks  (Read 870 times)
VA7CPC
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Posts: 2355




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« on: January 02, 2006, 01:36:38 PM »

I want to thank all of you who have responded to "How should I increase my code speed" by saying:

   "Get on the air and make contacts!"

I have been having lots of fun in the "40m sandbox" around 7.050.   I'm still slow as molasses, but I'm making QSO's all over the US, and enjoying it.  And slowly, my speed is increasing.

Sure beats listening to the MFJ-418 code-practice machine!

Thanks.
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20542




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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2006, 08:47:03 PM »

HNY and thank you for the honesty.

There is absolutely NOTHING like simply making contacts, at any speed, molassas nor not, when it comes to ramping up code speed and ability.

I challenged every code student I've ever had (about 500 of them, now, over 25 years): Make 500 CW contacts on the air, show me your logbook to verify the contacts, and then show me that you're not operating at 25 wpm.  Anybody who can do this wins $500 cash, on the spot.

After 25 years, nobody ever came back to claim the prize.  It's impossible.

WB2WIK/6
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WA9FZB
Member

Posts: 171




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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2006, 05:47:33 AM »

Gentlemen:
This, in my opinion, is the very value of the old Novice license!  When I first joined the ranks, we novices were granted limited HF privileges -- all within the CW bands.  Learning Morse Code was a rite of passage.  We knew we must learn it well enough to upgrade before our one-year novice licenses expired.  Sure, there was the Technician license, but in the early 1960's, VHF was pretty empty.  All the fun was on HF, and we just learned the code by being active on the novice CW bands for that first year.  Extremely few lids resulted!  Many of the CW ops I work now were novices during that same time.  We learned to enjoy CW, and still do.

Welcome!
73
Steve  WA9FZB
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