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Author Topic: Reports of RF on my audio with my Kenwood TS 50 transceiver  (Read 1155 times)
W7QHH
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Posts: 85




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« on: January 07, 2017, 06:00:28 PM »

  I have been using my TS 50 transceiver for several years. Transmitting mostly around 7.268.5 with excellent audio reports. Recently I tuned up on 7240 to get on the swap net. Several stations told me I had RF in my audio. My antenna is a 130' doublet, center fed with open wire feed line going to a 4:1 balun. The other side of the balun has about a 12' piece of 50 ohm coax going thru the shack wall to a MFJ 949E tuner which is connected to the TS 50 with about a foot of the same coax to the rig. I have placed snap on ferrite cores both right at the mic connector and at both ends of the 12' piece of coax.
   If anyone out their has any other suggestions as to how to cure my problem, your input will certainly be appreciated.
                                       W7QHH, an old timer in Reno NV
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K2OWK
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2017, 10:15:29 PM »

There can not be RF on your audio, you would not hear it. Ask what the audio sounds like? Is it a buzz, a hum. distortion or what?
 
73s

K2OWK
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W7QHH
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Posts: 85




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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2017, 03:28:23 PM »

I learned many years ago that RF getting into your audio will cause distortion in the transmitted signal. You certainly can get RF into your audio, you can't hear it but stations hearing your signal sure can. W7QHH
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NA4IT
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2017, 05:41:35 AM »

I would check the antenna system for faults...

You could also change your feed from using a 4:1 balun into coax to two parallel coaxes inline with the ladder line. You need to tie one end of the coax shields together and ground them, then use the center conductors as you would ladder line and connect them to the ladder line outputs on your tune.
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K1TWH
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2017, 02:20:02 PM »

Clyde, watch the length on the balance feeder.  You may find adding 5-10 feet will affect the RFI.   The feeder can voltage node into the shack and that make all the ferrite toroids ineffective.  There's no current to choke if you are at a voltage max.   You could attach 33ft of counterpoise to the radio, also, is the antenna directly over the house (many of us don't have any other choice) ?    Antennas radiate and if overhead, the fields cut through house wiring and maybe even anything attached to the TS-50 making RF troubleshooting often work on one band,and not work on another.   So, I'd try change feedline length, then some ferrites and then a counterpoise.   Some ideas, your mileage will vary because everyones QTH is a bit different.   Best wishes.  K1TWH
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K4EQ
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2017, 09:28:56 AM »

What microphone are you using? The MC-60A is known to cause this problem. There's a simple fix.
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ND6M
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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2017, 05:02:19 PM »

What microphone are you using? The MC-60A is known to cause this problem. There's a simple fix.
it's not the mic, it's RF INSIDE the shack

http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,113313.0.html
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W7QHH
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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2017, 05:00:05 AM »

I'm using the hand mic that came with the radio. Thanks for your input.
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