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Author Topic: Ooma Telo modem rendered non functioning by Amateur Radio  (Read 6317 times)
W4FSA
Member

Posts: 6




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« on: July 23, 2016, 06:14:05 AM »

I have used Ooma for about a  year and did not connect the dots that when ever I got on HF, the Ooma modem died.
1.  I have proved this with the last replacement as it lasted less than 24 hours.
2.  I recently returned to HF and acquired an IC-7300, run barefoot at about 80 watts to an OCF dipole in the attack and a stealth painted Hustler 6 BTV in the garden.
3.  The modem is not connected to any house telco wiring as we use cordless exclusively.
4.  There are snap on chokes on the power, cat5 and cordless phone cables.
5.  The modem used to be in my office/shack, the last one was moved to the other side of the house and still failed.

Has anyone experience with RF problems and VoIP modems and perhaps a cure.

VR

Eric
W4FSA
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W9IQ
Member

Posts: 1098




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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2016, 06:49:03 AM »

Eric,

You may have better luck with type 43 torroids and multiple turns through them. 10 turns is equivalent to 100 snap-ons with a more effective core material.
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
W4FSA
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2016, 08:00:24 AM »

Thanks Glenn

Fair Rite just got my order.

VR

Eric
W4FSA
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W8QZ
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 07:37:56 AM »

I had a similar experience with the 'Telo' - there's a thread on QRZ I started.

https://forums.qrz.com/index.php?threads/ooma-telo-killed-by-rfi.495601/

Killed 4 of 'em totally dead before figuring out what was causing it (near field HF transmissions - 17M seemed the worst, for some reason). With the last one, I added some filtering - caps on the DC power, and on the phone line. I also added about 3 turns (all that would fit) on each of the Ethernet lines, in / out, through big junk box toroids (scavenged from an old PC power supply). The last Telo didn't die completely after RF exposure - the lights would still come on (sort of), but it didn't function. I offered to discuss the issue with the Ooma people - if there was an engineer available who know something - but was never taken up on the offer.
We switched to plain-old-telephone-service, on the traditional twisted pair. Reliable, but not as nice, nor as cheap.
Now, my wife wants to go back to Ooma. This means a more aggressive and effective filtering design is required. Mulling over the design options - especially on how to filter the Ethernet line (maybe have to connect the Telo after the router - so there's only 1 line to filter ? )
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KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 1921




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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2017, 08:13:07 AM »

put the modem in a shielded box, bypass the lines at the shield, and tie it to ground.  you will need some screened holes in there to dissipate heat.
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WB4SPT
Member

Posts: 400




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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2017, 09:11:51 AM »

put the modem in a shielded box, bypass the lines at the shield, and tie it to ground.  you will need some screened holes in there to dissipate heat.

Ah, the brute force approach.   We might need to consider how to "bypass" the Ethernet port.   Shocked

Maybe the OP has some Ethernet to optical convertor boxes laying around. 
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