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Author Topic: pitch during cw test..  (Read 511 times)
KC2ISO
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Posts: 1




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« on: February 04, 2006, 07:32:38 PM »

This has more then likley been asked..but please forgive my ignorance.
 While  studying CW at what pitch should I have it?
 I've been using 700, on the G4FON program, but when I switch to something around 850-1000, I find it difficult to copy. I'm sure I could get used to it, but it would take some adjustment on my part.
 So this makes me alittle concerned when it comes to test time.
 Is there a standard that people follow when giving these test's out?
Thx
Jeff
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KC2DLA
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2006, 08:55:27 PM »

I set G4FON to 800Hz.  I did this because I plan on operating a CW-only radio that has a fixed 800Hz sidetone.  I used to set it at 700Hz and it took a while for me to adjust to the higher pitch.

I do not know what pitch a morse test would be given at.  I am sure that it is not more than 800Hz.
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KB1LKR
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Posts: 1899




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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2006, 08:56:53 PM »

I believe the ARRL VEC uses 750 Hz for Element 1, not sure about W5YI or other VEC's.
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N0UY
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Posts: 158




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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2006, 06:58:59 AM »

Hi Jeff,
Well I beleive the pitch is around 700-750hz also.  The thing is not to go into the test feeling like the tone is going to be a deal breaker.  Your mind will adjust for this very short period of time anyway.  When I took the test some years ago I was somewhat nervous about the outcome.  I took it at the local law enforcement center where the VE had set it up for several of us.  Guess what, I was the only one to show up so I got to do it solo.  During the test the vhf two way was blurting out calls from the squad cars so I learn a valuable lesson.  Even though the learning software could add noise to represent bad band conditions I was forunate that when I used to study the code I didn't go to an isolated room where no one would bother me.  I did it right in the middle of everyone and the noise associated with a large family.  I beleive that is why I didn't freak out when the code copy test didn't go as I had played it out in my head.  My advise to you is when it is time for your test go at it as if it where just another day in front of the computer.  Don't feel like the whole world is watching you because they're not.  Take time to copy some actual test qso's so you know what type of info is going to be sent.

Do it sooner than later.  You will never be sorry you did whether you catch the CW bug or not.

Best Wishes,   Ray
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W6ZF
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Posts: 13


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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2006, 08:09:44 AM »

Whenever I taught a code class (moons ago mind you) everything was set to 720 Hz and that's what I use on the air today +/- 20 Hz unless contesting then it's around 600 Hz.
I never heard any of my students complain about the frequency when taking an exam and now with the speed only at 5 wpm it probably won't even enter into the equation...but that's just conjecture on my part.
Try not to worry so much about it and just do it.  Good luck.
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NI0C
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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2006, 10:20:44 AM »

People vary widely in their preferred pitch; however for a code test it shouldn't matter much, unless one has some hearing loss.   Just for the sake of eliminating a variable during test time though, you are wise to practice at a pitch that is in the ballpark of what you will hear during the actual test.

CW pitch is much more important in on the air operating in the presence of noise and other signals.  Even though many radios are setup for a standard pitch around 700-800 Hz, this really is toward the upper limit of what experienced CW operators prefer.  People operating at higher speeds with stronger signals seem to like a pitch at 600-800 Hz; while people trying to dig out weak signals from the noise (lowband DX or QRP work) seem to do best at lower pitches (300 to 500 Hz).

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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KF6CZG
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2006, 01:27:07 PM »

The local ARRL VEC-administered exams use 720Hz. I e-mailed them. I've been studying at 750 and 700 alternating, as the G4FON program doesn't allow anything in between.
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AA1LL
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2006, 08:00:06 PM »

Chuck N0IC is correct that lower frequencies are better for picking a station out of the noise with the human ear.  I remember a graph in a radar book that showed the human ear was most sensitive and selective at 300Hz and the effective bandwidth rolled off gradually on either side.  It has been my experience that 300Hz is kind of low and I favor something around 500Hz for actual operating.  A lot of people have been exposed to 400Hz generators and their ears have been numbed to that frequency!  

But for a code test the frequency should not matter if your mind is just comparing combinations of long and short beeps of some frequency.  

73, Paul, AA1LL
Mason, NH
http://www,qsl.net/aa1ll
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