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Author Topic: New car battery?  (Read 3330 times)
WALTERB
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« on: April 11, 2012, 11:38:53 AM »

I thought I read someplace about Compromise (dual use) battery between a traditional car battery and a deep cycle battery.  Does anybody recommend one of these for their car for ham use?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 11:49:20 AM by WALTERB » Logged
K5LXP
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2012, 11:51:58 AM »

A compromise between an SLI and deep cycle would be a marine battery.  I wouldn't recommend one for SLI duty.  For one they come in limited sizes and likely not one that will fit your car, and for another they're only spec'd to 32F (not many running boats below that temp).

Once you tell us what you're up to perhaps something in particular could be recommended.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM

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WALTERB
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2012, 12:04:58 PM »

A compromise between an SLI and deep cycle would be a marine battery.  I wouldn't recommend one for SLI duty.  For one they come in limited sizes and likely not one that will fit your car, and for another they're only spec'd to 32F (not many running boats below that temp).

Once you tell us what you're up to perhaps something in particular could be recommended.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM




I have a 4 cylinder kia.  It doesn’t take much to crank it over.  I also want to use my yaesu 857D in without having to constantly run the vehicle to charge the battery (if that’s possible).
Granted the car won’t hold a large battery.  I’m in the market for a new battery anyway, and I thought I would do a bit of research before I bought one.   If a traditional battery would work best that’s fine. 
Thanks.
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2012, 12:26:09 PM »

a simpler solution would be to leave the stock battery in the Kia, and invest in one of the portable units with a Gel Cell, AC charger, and short jumper cables, that can be used for an emergency start. Keep an eye on the car battery voltage while you're operating, and restart the engine if it gets below a certain value, like 12.0 or 11.5, and have the portable unit as a lifeboat. You'll gradually learn how much operating you can safely do and still restart without lifting the hood. You will need a way to keep an eye on the car system voltage - perhaps one  of the digital Volt/amp readouts with the Powerpole connectors on both ends, in series with the radio power lead would be useful.
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WALTERB
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2012, 12:37:15 PM »

a simpler solution would be to leave the stock battery in the Kia, and invest in one of the portable units with a Gel Cell, AC charger, and short jumper cables, that can be used for an emergency start. Keep an eye on the car battery voltage while you're operating, and restart the engine if it gets below a certain value, like 12.0 or 11.5, and have the portable unit as a lifeboat. You'll gradually learn how much operating you can safely do and still restart without lifting the hood. You will need a way to keep an eye on the car system voltage - perhaps one  of the digital Volt/amp readouts with the Powerpole connectors on both ends, in series with the radio power lead would be useful.

well the one option may not be an option.  I can't seem to find a marine battery that will fit on the battery shelf.  I'm not done looking but its not promising.   Grin

Its not that critical.  I just thought if I'm going to spend $125 on a new battery, I might as well get something that works well in the ham world as well.

thanks
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N6AJR
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2012, 12:49:21 PM »

Those round cell batteries, with either a yellow, blue or red tops may fit and one of them is a deep cycle.  I have 2 radios in the car and 5 in the pickup and run them all off the standard battery.  if running more than a few minutes, I start it up and let it idle.   or add a gel cell in the cab, .
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WALTERB
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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2012, 01:12:05 PM »

Those round cell batteries, with either a yellow, blue or red tops may fit and one of them is a deep cycle.  I have 2 radios in the car and 5 in the pickup and run them all off the standard battery.  if running more than a few minutes, I start it up and let it idle.   or add a gel cell in the cab, .

yes, those are optima batteries.  I'm sure they would work, but are more pricey than I care for.  Grin

I'll probably just stick to a traditional car battery.

thanks
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W8JX
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« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2012, 01:44:41 PM »

Those round cell batteries, with either a yellow, blue or red tops may fit and one of them is a deep cycle.  I have 2 radios in the car and 5 in the pickup and run them all off the standard battery.  if running more than a few minutes, I start it up and let it idle.   or add a gel cell in the cab, .

yes, those are optima batteries.  I'm sure they would work, but are more pricey than I care for.  Grin

I'll probably just stick to a traditional car battery.

thanks

I would add a second battery if you are concerned. I have long used one. I strap them when car is running but I can isolate it from car stationary and if I run it down no worries I can still start. I would avoid those high dollar Optima batteries as they do not offer anymore reserve capacity (discharge time at a 20hr rate) than a good conventional battery.
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WALTERB
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« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2012, 01:48:56 PM »



I would add a second battery if you are concerned. I have long used one. I strap them when car is running but I can isolate it from car stationary and if I run it down no worries I can still start. I would avoid those high dollar Optima batteries as they do not offer anymore reserve capacity (discharge time at a 20hr rate) than a good conventional battery.

Its a manual transmission, so worst case I can roll start it.  Grin
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W8JX
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« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2012, 01:53:33 PM »



I would add a second battery if you are concerned. I have long used one. I strap them when car is running but I can isolate it from car stationary and if I run it down no worries I can still start. I would avoid those high dollar Optima batteries as they do not offer anymore reserve capacity (discharge time at a 20hr rate) than a good conventional battery.

Its a manual transmission, so worst case I can roll start it.  Grin

Yes but it is not good for a car battery that you start with to be pulled that low often. Also with two batteries in parallel you will get more than 2x run time.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2012, 03:08:32 PM »

I also want to use my yaesu 857D in without having to constantly run the vehicle to charge the battery (if that’s possible).

How long you plan on running the radio, and how often will dictate if it's worth the bother of a second/different battery.  "Once in a while" it's not worth the trouble.  Every weekend for hours on end would demand it.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K7RBW
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« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2012, 06:35:45 AM »

The Optima batteries are great if you're driving in a rough environment. If your car never leaves the pavement, they are overkill. One option is to look for a "jumper pack" which is a larger gel-cell pack that you can use to jump-start your car. You could use that to operate your radio or to boost your car if you're using the car's battery. The good thing about them is they are portable and self-contained.

If you're running the -857, another trick is to ground the brown wire to put it in "QRP" mode. doing that limits the output power to 20-watts or less and does some other battery-saving things.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2012, 03:11:08 PM »

there is also a device called a constant duty solenoid, which is just like a ford starter solenoid but made to stay on for hours  ( the ford starter solenoids burn up in about 18 minutes... not made for constant duty, don't ask how I know:)  ) and they cost around 10 bucks. a local ham has a second deep cycle in his car and has several small solar panels to keep the charged, so there are options, but a single 2 m FM radio on 5 watts will not do much to you car battery, but a 100 watt  hf rig on RTTY will draw a bunch of current like a steady 22 amps, so you know what is need on your end.
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W8JX
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« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2012, 03:29:46 PM »

a single 2 m FM radio on 5 watts will not do much to you car battery, but a 100 watt  hf rig on RTTY will draw a bunch of current like a steady 22 amps, so you know what is need on your end.

Not sure where people get this 22 amps. Of the 3 different Kenwood radios I tested/measured (a 140, 570 and 480) the highest draw was 18.4 amps and lowest was about 17.5 amps at 100 watts out. typically manufacture ratings for power drain is usually higher than it actual is. Better to error to high side than have it use a 1/2 amp or so more than spec. Nobody will ever complain about it using less power than specs but likely will if it uses more. Also who is going to run 100 watt RTTY from a mobile?
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K1CJS
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« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2012, 04:56:37 AM »

I would add a second battery if you are concerned. I have long used one. I strap them when car is running but I can isolate it from car stationary and if I run it down no worries I can still start. I would avoid those high dollar Optima batteries as they do not offer anymore reserve capacity (discharge time at a 20hr rate) than a good conventional battery.

Its a manual transmission, so worst case I can roll start it.  Grin

I would be careful about that.  Some of the newer cars with electronic ignition circuitry will not start that way if the battery voltage drops low enough.  Has to do with the vehicle computers and their minimum voltage requirement.
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