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Author Topic: The Best CW Transceiver?  (Read 44586 times)
N3QE
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Posts: 2163




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« Reply #45 on: October 22, 2012, 02:39:21 AM »

My 3 cents: NONlinear in the final, and absolutely no penny for an SSB option.

For a change I think I am in violent agreement with you. My HW-16 certainly is a sweet CW rig and is completely in line with your requirements.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3877




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« Reply #46 on: October 22, 2012, 02:21:46 PM »

You guys, are telling which set is the best. That is because it is your set, or because you have or had  2 sets and are telling which of the 2 is best in your opinion.

So 5 votes for set X and 3 votes for set Y. Does that make set X the best?

Don't think so.

You better make a list of requirements (specifications)
make a compromise (because zero used power does not meet 100 watt output)
and publish your opinion about specifications.

Specifications aren't the whole story. In fact, they're not even a major factor.

What matters is how much fun a rig is to use. No specification tells that.



My 3 cents: NONlinear in the final, and absolutely no penny for an SSB option.
 


The Southgate series sure live up to that! Type 7 has been in service since the mid-1990s, almost time for the Type 8.

----

So, Bob - what do YOU use?

73 de Jim, N2EY
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 371




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« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2012, 04:43:05 PM »

Why does it have to be a transceiver for a start, if we are going down a pure cw road, many of the functions of a combo one size fits all rig just do just not hack it.

We do not all use the same side tone frequency so often we can end up chasing each other up n down the band.

The final is best off at Class C, I agree with other there, if it biased off completely it makes listening through that much easier.

So we need a very stable TX, that can quickly and easily be brought onto the same freq as the RX, but then can be split off, e.g. up 5 or 10 this beyond the scope of most XIT controls.

The RX needs to have a totally different filter selection to a SSB unit 100Hz 250 500 and 750 or 1000 for searching.

As for QSK, I have never heard a transceiver that can come close to true QSK, sidetone in one ear and rx in the other then you can really hear through your signal, unfortunately, to make this work properly the TX needs to be away from the RX and both running separate aerials.

So for me, my Collins 75A4 will do as the RX, and I am still looking for a good TX, but one of the nicer heathkit's would do me, followed by a class C amplifier,  if I cannot find what I want guess it will be back to the Drake B or C lines which are both on the desk as well.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 859




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« Reply #48 on: October 23, 2012, 12:44:38 AM »

My best CW transceiver is the one sitting on my desk today.

If I change it with another - that will be my best CW transceiver.

What makes the difference is the decoder between the ears.
Great noise canceller, filtering, variable AGC and able to tune out the TV blasting in the same room.

73 - Rob
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3773




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« Reply #49 on: October 23, 2012, 08:53:11 AM »

STAYVERTICAL:   Well said! 
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N2EY
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Posts: 3877




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« Reply #50 on: October 23, 2012, 02:36:13 PM »

Why does it have to be a transceiver for a start, if we are going down a pure cw road, many of the functions of a combo one size fits all rig just do just not hack it.

That depends on what transceiver you're looking at. Besides that, for many kinds of amateur operation, separates aren't really the best choice.

We do not all use the same side tone frequency so often we can end up chasing each other up n down the band.

Not if the transceiver is set up properly. Some rigs, like the Elecraft K2, let you set the tone to what you like best, by adjusting the BFO. The sending tone is similarly adjustable.

The final is best off at Class C, I agree with other there, if it biased off completely it makes listening through that much easier.

So we need a very stable TX, that can quickly and easily be brought onto the same freq as the RX, but then can be split off, e.g. up 5 or 10 this beyond the scope of most XIT controls.

All that takes is a second VFO.

The RX needs to have a totally different filter selection to a SSB unit 100Hz 250 500 and 750 or 1000 for searching.

As for QSK, I have never heard a transceiver that can come close to true QSK, sidetone in one ear and rx in the other then you can really hear through your signal, unfortunately, to make this work properly the TX needs to be away from the RX and both running separate aerials.

The Ten Tec and Elecraft rigs I have used give excellent QSK with one antenna. Most hams cannot emulate the commercial practice of separate tx and rx sites and antennas.

So for me, my Collins 75A4 will do as the RX, and I am still looking for a good TX, but one of the nicer heathkit's would do me, followed by a class C amplifier,  if I cannot find what I want guess it will be back to the Drake B or C lines which are both on the desk as well.

The A4 is certainly a good rx, but IMHO it has some severe
 limitations:
1) No transceive capability
2) Even with the add-on reduction tuning knob, the tuning rate is 25 kHz per turn. Much too fast for my taste.
3) No 160 meters or WARC, although both could be accomodated by external converters.
Some folks would prefer something newer than 1959 vintage, too.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 371




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« Reply #51 on: October 24, 2012, 12:18:50 AM »

Jim.  My A4 has 160 on the bandswitch and I know it works cos when I was 16 and had saved up all my pennies I bought the A4 and worked across the pond as G3YCP on 160.   Oh those were the days.  Had a Collins TCS for the TX.

I am just looking at the logistics of putting the big vertical away from the house, and how to get 1000 feet of feedline up there, that should help give a bit of seperation.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 12:23:01 AM by ZL1DAB » Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3877




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« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2012, 07:41:37 AM »

Jim.  My A4 has 160 on the bandswitch and I know it works cos when I was 16 and had saved up all my pennies I bought the A4 and worked across the pond as G3YCP on 160. 

MY BAD! I was thinking of the S-line.

 Oh those were the days.  Had a Collins TCS for the TX.

I am just looking at the logistics of putting the big vertical away from the house, and how to get 1000 feet of feedline up there, that should help give a bit of seperation.

Consider W2LYH's QSK system as an alternative....

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N4OI
Member

Posts: 203




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« Reply #53 on: November 01, 2012, 07:48:30 AM »

[...] My 3 cents: NONlinear in the final, and absolutely no penny for an SSB option.[...]

Or perhaps take it a step further;  how about a very basic criterion: NO connector labeled "Mic" ?  For example, this would qualify the following from my growing collection of radios:

  • Elecraft K1
  • Ten-Tec Century 21
  • Small Wonder Labs DSW-II (20m and 40m)
  • Small Wonder Labs Rockmite

But I have to admit, I prefer my K3 or FT-920 for picking tough signals out of the QRM and QRN!

73 ES GOD BLESS U ES URS DE KEN N4OI  Grin
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WY4J
Member

Posts: 110




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« Reply #54 on: November 18, 2012, 03:45:14 AM »

CW enthusiast for 36 years and counting. I wholeheartedly agree, the KWM-2 was and a real lousy cw rig. Great for SSB, terrible for cw. In 36 years i have owned a few rigs. My favorite cw radio is my current, a Kenwood TS-590. Some say, that a K3 is the best but for less than half the price tag you will get the same performance from a Kenwood TS-590. Disregard what the haters say as any hobby has their cranky old dudes who hate everything. Try one at a hamfest or at a buddy's house and you will be convinced...it was.

73,
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 527




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« Reply #55 on: November 18, 2012, 07:56:33 AM »

The Eico 753, a lot hams swore by it..(or was it the other way around?). It featured 'auto search'  so you would not spend all night looking for signals... it would 'find' them for you. It sold for about $75 some 40 years ago and you can still find it for $75 today on E-Bay. Use it with the Gotham vertical antenna and you can relive the exciting days of ham radio in the late 60's and early 70's..

Runnerup would be the 'Griefkit' HW-7 with the Gotham vertical...
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K6LO
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Posts: 226




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« Reply #56 on: November 18, 2012, 07:58:55 AM »

"Auto search"  Grin
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KK4CPH
Member

Posts: 154




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« Reply #57 on: November 18, 2012, 09:02:06 AM »

The Eico 753, a lot hams swore by it..(or was it the other way around?). It featured 'auto search'  so you would not spend all night looking for signals... it would 'find' them for you. It sold for about $75 some 40 years ago and you can still find it for $75 today on E-Bay. Use it with the Gotham vertical antenna and you can relive the exciting days of ham radio in the late 60's and early 70's..

Runnerup would be the 'Griefkit' HW-7 with the Gotham vertical...

There's one on ebay starting at $12 and no bidders.  I just read the reviews and see what you mean by "auto search."   Cheesy
The cheap price is tempting but I already have a "three-drifty."  Wink

Eric
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KG6AF
Member

Posts: 349




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« Reply #58 on: November 18, 2012, 12:59:44 PM »

The Eico 753, a lot hams swore by it..(or was it the other way around?). It featured 'auto search'  so you would not spend all night looking for signals... it would 'find' them for you.

The benefit of owning a 753 is that, after using it a while, any other transceiver you buy will seem like the best one in the world.
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 527




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« Reply #59 on: November 20, 2012, 03:34:42 PM »

The Eico 753, a lot hams swore by it..(or was it the other way around?). It featured 'auto search'  so you would not spend all night looking for signals... it would 'find' them for you. It sold for about $75 some 40 years ago and you can still find it for $75 today on E-Bay. Use it with the Gotham vertical antenna and you can relive the exciting days of ham radio in the late 60's and early 70's..

Runnerup would be the 'Griefkit' HW-7 with the Gotham vertical...

There's one on ebay starting at $12 and no bidders.  I just read the reviews and see what you mean by "auto search."   Cheesy
The cheap price is tempting but I already have a "three-drifty."  Wink

Eric


It sold for a whopping $38 ...lmao  I wonder who was the one who got stuck with it. the one who bought it.  No it wasn't me...

--------------------------------------------------

Vintage Eico 753 Tri Band Ham Tube Radio Transceiver
See original listing
Vintage-Eico-753-Tri-Band-Ham-Tube-Radio-Transceiver
Item Sold
Item condition:
--
Ended:
Nov 19, 2012 22:17:23 PST

Winning bid:
US $38.01

[ 9 bids ]
Shipping:
Local pick-up offered.
Item location:
Modesto, California, United States
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