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Author Topic: Mfj 2286 backpack antenna  (Read 7621 times)
N8TI
Member

Posts: 115




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« on: May 08, 2012, 08:18:07 PM »

I just saw in CQ that MFJ came out with a new antenna. It is a vertical that is suppose to work on 8 bands. It is a portable antenna that weighs 2 pounds. It can extend to 17 feet.

Anyone know anything about this?

Joe
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WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13113




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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2012, 08:54:44 PM »

That's not difficult to do with a telescoping whip and a manually-tapped loading coil,
especially if you include 6m rather than 80m for your 8th band.

The hard part is getting it to work efficiently - usually such vertical antennas require
a good radial system for reasonable efficiency.  But that's not something that the
Marketing department worries about when they write advertising copy.
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K5LXP
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Posts: 4465


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2012, 08:56:16 PM »

All the details are right on their site.  Basically a coil and a collapsible whip.  Decent size whip though, would be a natural quarter wave on 20.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K1WJ
Member

Posts: 454




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« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2012, 10:12:16 AM »

Joe,

I just ordered one - mine will be ground mounted with 16 ground radials of various lengths in back yard of AZ HOA.
Should work great on 6-20m - adjusted for 1/4 wave. Will submit review here in a month or so.

Best 73 K1WJ - David
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KE4KE
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2012, 10:12:16 PM »

I just ordered one and the tripod. My plan is to use it for Field Day. Most of the state parks in this part of the country have very small camp sites and there is just not enough room for a nice dipole. The trees are pretty thick as well and that is another concern. I may also use a rotatable dipole made with hamsticks as well since those are pretty easy to get up at 30 ft. I have twelve 35ft ground radials cut now and plan to at least double that. I bought a 4BTV for permanent use at the "home" station as antenna #2. Antenna #1 is a G5RV. I will try to post a review here after I get a chance to try it out. Hope it's not too long as it is on back order.
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N4LPK
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2013, 08:06:59 AM »

I bought one of these that I plan to use at a Winter Field Day event in January. I am mounting mine on a tripod.  I have the counterpoise kit that comes with it and I plan to add more.  I am acquiring a LDG Z 100 Plus auto tuner to use with it.  My question is has anyone used this with an auto tuner and just shorted out the coil and tuned the eight bands with the tuner? If so what were your results?
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N4RSS
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Posts: 258




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« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2013, 08:09:34 AM »

I bought one of these that I plan to use at a Winter Field Day event in January. I am mounting mine on a tripod.  I have the counterpoise kit that comes with it and I plan to add more.  I am acquiring a LDG Z 100 Plus auto tuner to use with it.  My question is has anyone used this with an auto tuner and just shorted out the coil and tuned the eight bands with the tuner? If so what were your results?

Why would you do that ?  That's the purpose of the coil - to provide an impedance match.  Matching purely at the transceiver won't alleviate line losses
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N4LPK
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2013, 09:18:18 AM »

Well I thought that as well but reading some reviews suggested that it could be done this way.  I will more then likely use it using the coil as designed.   Thanks for your reply.
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W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1619




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« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2013, 12:12:33 PM »

Old design only NEW to MFJ. Check out Phil Silas AD5X and the Ultimate Portable HF Vertical Antenna and you don't need to haul a tripod around or spend $99.00 +S/H.
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KC8JRR
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2013, 06:26:45 PM »

But when you look at the cost to build some of these the parts can cost more than you can  buy them already done the 17' element alone from MFJ is $60 !

I know home built is the base of ham radio but its hard to beat the low prices on some of this stuff.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2013, 07:21:15 PM by KC8JRR » Logged
KC9YTJ
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Posts: 62




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« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2013, 06:59:46 PM »

If you read the article, you'll find the secret MFJ discount code :-)
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1619




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« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2013, 06:13:43 AM »

Re: KC8JRR reply #9

$60.00 for 17 ft. element Huh. I've built two, one of short copper pipes sections and $8.00 telescoping car radio antenna, the other a $12.00 16 ft. telescoping  Cabela's crappie pole to support a 16 ft. wire radiator and center coil. The most expensive part is if you by the coil from MFJ which sells it specifically for the AD5X antenna, I made my own coils.
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KC8JRR
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2013, 04:39:27 PM »

 W1JKA
I like the  crappie pole idea I might give that a try , how did you attach the wire to the pole ?
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13113




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« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2013, 04:46:06 PM »

The pole I have has a little eye loop on the end.  I'm planning to stick a thin wire up the
inside of the top section as far as it will go, secure it with a bit of glue, and let it hang
down inside the fishing pole and out the bottom.


And, yes, you can feed it directly from a tuner at the base instead of the tapped coil -
that also avoids having to telescope the whip down for the bands above 20m where it
is longer than 1/4 wavelength (so a series coil won't match it.)  The tuner is probably
easier if you plan to change bands a lot and/or the antenna is mounted remotely.
The manual adjustment to the antenna is fine if you aren't going to jump bands too
much and the antenna is easy to reach for adjustments.  Personal choice.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2013, 04:49:34 PM by WB6BYU » Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1619




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« Reply #14 on: December 13, 2013, 07:11:22 AM »

Re: KC8JRR reply #12

Several ways as per WB6BYU, the crappie pole is by far the easiest to make and set up and carry, my top half wire is connected to the eyelet via a small fish line snap swivel, a cloths pin will work also since it's a temporary set up. My wire runs outside the pole, connected to both ends of coil and center conductor of coax feed via alligator clips and coil is held to pole with either a Velcro strip or 2 small plastic zip ties since it is not permanently in place like the copper tube version. Wires are rolled up and put inside of coil for transport. My pole base to get the 17 ft. height is simply a 16 in. long wood dowel that has the aluminum angle attached (the radial/coax connector) slid into bottom of pole with a 8 inch spike (head cut off) epoxied into bottom of dowel and have 3 lengths of small nylon for guys at coil height.
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