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Author Topic: who directs where a driver gets placed in the computer's file-structure?  (Read 5014 times)
KM3K
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« on: May 14, 2012, 10:35:18 AM »

Hello,
I'm having a serious issue with Windows7-64bit and drivers.
This is related to another subject I have posted "directions confusing" and I've copied a small part of it here.

I've found out, via a lot of googling, that Windows7 now has special places to keep drivers.
Apparently, based on this link "http://www.msigeek.com/322/driver-store-in-windows-7-and-vista", 64-bit drivers go to a new storage-area for future call-up.
The path is "C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore".
This link "http://www.articleinput.com/e/a/title/Where-does-Windows-7-store-drivers-for-devices/" claims there is a 32-bit driver store.
The path for the 32-bit drivers is "C:\Windows\SysWOW64\DriverStore"; "WOW" stands for "Windows-on-Windows".
On my HP Pavilion p6-2021 with Win7-64bit home-premium, I've gone to those places to see what is there.

BTW, why there has to be 32-bit and 64-bit drivers is beyond my pay-grade here in ham-radio to understand.

Anyway, my questions are, "Which coding decides where the drivers are installed? Does the programmer writing the driver tell the computer or does the OS handle those details?"

73 Jerry KM3K
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2012, 10:56:24 AM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit. Drivers, like applications, can access twice as much memory if they are 64 bit - thus they run more efficiently.

A 64 bit OS can run 64 bit or 32 bit software but a 32 bit OS won't run 64 bit software.
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2012, 12:31:24 PM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit. Drivers, like applications, can access twice as much memory if they are 64 bit - thus they run more efficiently.

The 64-bit flavor of Windows 7 can access up to 192 GB of RAM, quite a bit more than twice the 4 GB limit imposed by the 32-bit flavor.

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K5UNX
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2012, 01:58:41 PM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit. Drivers, like applications, can access twice as much memory if they are 64 bit - thus they run more efficiently.

The 64-bit flavor of Windows 7 can access up to 192 GB of RAM, quite a bit more than twice the 4 GB limit imposed by the 32-bit flavor.

And that 192 GB limit is simply a Windows limitation. 64bit machines can theoretically address 16.4 million terabytes of memory. So we're not going to run out address space again soon.
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KG6AF
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2012, 02:01:59 PM »

A 64 bit OS can run 64 bit or 32 bit software but a 32 bit OS won't run 64 bit software.

Just to be clear: it's true that 64-bit Windows will run 64-bit and (most) 32-bit Windows applications.  However, a 64-bit Windows system can't run 32-bit drivers.
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KM3K
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2012, 05:32:08 PM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit.
OK, thanks for the reply.
I've ordered SIIG-card#JJ-E10D11-S3 and am in the process of returning three different cards that don't get along with HP Pavilion p6 & Win7/64 Home-Premium.
Now I've never heard of SIIG before (I never used RS232 in my professional work) but, from their website, it seems like they make stuff for industrial users.
So I'm hopeful that their product will be a winner for me; besides I've ordered it from the HP website, so that's a good omen for me that HP is selling a SIIG product.
Anyway, could someone tell me where in the driver-coding I could see where the OS gets the info it needs to place the code in the proper file location?
I'd look at the code when it comes here later this week.
73 Jerry KM3K
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AA4PB
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2012, 05:53:49 PM »

I misspoke - Twice as many bits but that's a lot more than twice as many bytes of RAM.
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KC4MOP
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« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2012, 03:37:12 AM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit. Drivers, like applications, can access twice as much memory if they are 64 bit - thus they run more efficiently.

The 64-bit flavor of Windows 7 can access up to 192 GB of RAM, quite a bit more than twice the 4 GB limit imposed by the 32-bit flavor.

And that 192 GB limit is simply a Windows limitation. 64bit machines can theoretically address 16.4 million terabytes of memory. So we're not going to run out address space again soon.
I guess we will now, that you told us. Some inefficient software creator will think of some way to clog our fast machines.
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2012, 03:56:00 PM »

The OS decides, based on whether the driver code is 32 bit or 64 bit. Drivers, like applications, can access twice as much memory if they are 64 bit - thus they run more efficiently.

The 64-bit flavor of Windows 7 can access up to 192 GB of RAM, quite a bit more than twice the 4 GB limit imposed by the 32-bit flavor.

And that 192 GB limit is simply a Windows limitation. 64bit machines can theoretically address 16.4 million terabytes of memory. So we're not going to run out address space again soon.

We (Rational Software, then known as Rational Machines) developed and sold a machine with 64-bit addressing from 1985 through 1992; it was the only commercially successful high-level language-directed architecture. You can see one in Silicon Valley's Computer History Museum.

We never did run it out of address space...
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2012, 11:22:51 AM »

generically, the OS maker determines where drivers should go based on its seeking algorithm.  it so advised software developers through its support services.

the occasional rogue code writer will freakin' decide where my goldarn awesome freakin' drivers are gonna go, goldarnit.  and those snooty left-coasters can freakin' go to......

maybe it installs when the first 300 copies are sold, and maybe it doesn't.

but the first serious bug or security fix that closes the loophole the rogue code writer found by accident will crash his stuff now and forevermore, say halleluia.

it has been that way since windows 1.01.  and if you are a Mac man, well I gotta tell you, from day one in 1984, rogue code writers who do NOT worship and use the Mac Toolkit in ROM exactly as described all get quickly slapped by the Karma wheel.

I still maintain the c:\work directory on my windows machines, something from DOS 2.1 that I can't give up.  it's a form of security blanket.  but it's not an app haven, it's where the sniped logo snapshots and online cartoons reside.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 11:25:50 AM by KD0REQ » Logged
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