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Author Topic: CW Speed vs Propagation  (Read 1406 times)
VK2FAK
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Posts: 87




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« on: May 18, 2012, 04:25:55 PM »

Hi all....

I did read somewhere, where a CW op was having trouble making the contact at his normal speed around 25+wpm,   so dropped the speed down to 18 wpm and was about to finish off the QSO...simply because the signal was making the distance better.

Are the fast Op's shooting themselves in the foot so to speak by wanting to operate at a fast wpm speed and thus sacrifice a possible longer distance communication...

Assuming the OP is interested on making contacts around the world and just not local....some are, some are not..

John
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3827




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« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2012, 09:03:10 PM »

The ability to understand Morse at high speed goes down as propagation diminishes.  The ear and brain cannot "decode" Morse as well under these circumstances.

Then as propagation diminishes more is lost of a transmission during a static crash or quick fade.

A smart fast CW operator will automatically adjust speed with propagation.
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ZENKI
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Posts: 934




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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2012, 12:02:09 AM »

You really need to use common sense. On the low bands where you have deep long fading high speed CW can help. On the other hand  sending high speed can get your report through before the fading  gets your signal.
The same goes for heavy QRN, high speed can get the  message through. Many peoples radios have poor group delay in their CW filters which stretches QRN out which entirely blanks  your signal. Transmitting fast CW when heavy QRN is around can  help. The bottom line is just to use a    common sense speed of 25 to 30 wpm. If you detect the other operating is transmitting at high speed he can probably copy you at high speed, slowing down will break his rhythm causing confusion and broken calls because of the QRN or fading.

There is really no  right or wrong  answer you just learn from experience.

The most important rule is  that you dont  stretch out and slow send  what you trying to send, this causes more errors because its hard to work out what you trying to send. THis is the worst possible thing you can do and it really ruins the receiving stations  rhythm causing more errors. Send in a consistent manner and just repeat in a normal fist and speed. Thats how the PRO's use to do it on the commercial HF links
 


Hi all....

I did read somewhere, where a CW op was having trouble making the contact at his normal speed around 25+wpm,   so dropped the speed down to 18 wpm and was about to finish off the QSO...simply because the signal was making the distance better.

Are the fast Op's shooting themselves in the foot so to speak by wanting to operate at a fast wpm speed and thus sacrifice a possible longer distance communication...

Assuming the OP is interested on making contacts around the world and just not local....some are, some are not..

John
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NA7U
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Posts: 72


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« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2012, 05:15:00 PM »

I really doubt that the difference between 25 wpm and 18 wpm means the difference between working globally or locally. You didn't provide the original reference of what you read, but as stated there could be many reasons why the op slowed down at the end.
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W7ASA
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Posts: 226




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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2012, 09:15:57 PM »

I have found that slowing down (not too much!) for long path or fluttery polar paths does often improve copy both ways.  These conditions often cause multi-pathing, where the received signal arrives not instantaniously, but spread over a slice of time (a few milliseconds), causing a sound similar to the ringing in a very narrow filter, with it's slow start-up and slow decay. The very critical beginning and endings of the dits/dahs can tend to run together.  In this case, slower sending and spacing has helped me in the past. 

As an example, the polar path between central North America and Russia and Scandinavia would often produce a warbling, ringing sound to the CW signals which let me know that I was hearing a station on the other side of the pole long before the other fellow would send his call sign and confirm it.  Often the other station was LOUD enough for good QRQ, but the signal ringing across a disturbed polar path turned some of the great and lightning fast Russian operator's signals into mush.

Just my two cents worth - correct for currency inflation as required - - -


>de Ray  ..._ ._
W7ASA
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