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Author Topic: Nato c/w key  (Read 875 times)
VK4FIAA
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Posts: 5




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« on: May 23, 2012, 04:13:32 AM »

seeking circuitry/connections for the Nato/Navy key from the 1970's.  Len VK4FIAA  leaton@ecn.net.au
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2764




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« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2012, 08:59:32 AM »

Model number?  Picture?  More information?
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
TANAKASAN
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Posts: 933




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« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2012, 05:07:25 AM »

I'd love to be able to tell you but I stripped the wiring from my NATO key as soon as I got it. If you have a rig with slow QSK you could use the switch to switch between transmit and receive and knock it with your thumb before and after sending.

It's a beautiful well balanced key, I could send on mine for hours. See http://www.morsekey.net/nato.html for some details.

Tanakasan
« Last Edit: May 24, 2012, 05:13:34 AM by TANAKASAN » Logged
KC7YE
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Posts: 92




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« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2012, 08:06:49 AM »

Bet G0VQW has wiring pin out
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N4CR
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Posts: 1652




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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2012, 09:43:13 AM »

Wouldn't it be easiest to just lift one wire from the switch and wire a pair over to the radio? You don't have to gut it, but why put up with overly complex wiring to get a switch working?
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K7KBN
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Posts: 2764




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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2012, 10:30:00 AM »

I thought you might be talking about the SB-315x/U.  This was a combination key and on/off switch for a remote transmitter or other circuit.  It also had a standard 1/4" phone jack so we could attach our own "speed keys" when we came on watch.  I was on USS Kitty Hawk in the early/mid 1960s and grew quite used to these.  They were fine keys by themselves.

Agree with N4CR:  a key is simply a single pole, single throw switch.  No idea about the extra circuitry in the NATO key, but just find the two wires that form the keyed circuit itself, connect to them and send.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20543




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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2012, 01:42:22 PM »

I thought you might be talking about the SB-315x/U.  This was a combination key and on/off switch for a remote transmitter or other circuit.  It also had a standard 1/4" phone jack so we could attach our own "speed keys" when we came on watch.  I was on USS Kitty Hawk in the early/mid 1960s and grew quite used to these.  They were fine keys by themselves.

Agree with N4CR:  a key is simply a single pole, single throw switch.  No idea about the extra circuitry in the NATO key, but just find the two wires that form the keyed circuit itself, connect to them and send.

I've used the incredibly heavy gray covered NATO keys before.

You remove the cover to expose a 6-terminal strip for wiring and the key line output is terminals 3 & 4
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