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Author Topic: Belden 89907 coax cable  (Read 1789 times)
KC4YJI
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Posts: 27




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« on: May 22, 2012, 07:18:06 PM »

I have about 85' of Belden 89907 RG58a/u (type e34972) coax cable that was for Ethernet.  It is new and has a BNC connector on each end.  I was thinking of cutting it in half and using it for a couple of antennas that don't get used a lot.  One, at my parents house, a homebrew dual band ground plain 2 meter/440 mounted just above the roof.  Maybe another portable antenna when I go camping (coaxial dipole).  These will only be used about a week each year.  I did not want to buy something when I have this in the junk box.

My questions...

1.  Is this OK to use for 2 meter?
2.  Is this OK to use for 440?
3.  Is this OK to use for HF?
4.  Is it a OK to use a PL-259/SO-239 with 440? I have heard otherwise, but notice this is what many radios have on them.
5.  How would I put a PL-259 or BNC connector on it being that it is slightly smaller than RG 58?

I would like to use this as it already has a bnc connector on it.  I will be using it with a HT most of the time, although a mobile at times.  The longest run will be about 25'.  Thank for your help.

73's
Scott, KC4YJI
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KB1GTX
Member

Posts: 459




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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2012, 08:26:10 PM »

Link for the cable
http://www.belden.com/techdatas/english/89907.pdf

At 25 feet it's ok on those bands and for a pl259 try a snap on type,(it will fit the slightly odd size)

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103249
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012, 08:33:58 PM by KB1GTX » Logged
KD8GEH
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Posts: 465




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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 06:56:54 AM »

Hi Scott,

I have a gob of this stuff too, I use it for some HF stuff. Note the A/U means it has a stranded center conductor, so its a little different to solder typical with connectors. As far as your questions:

Look at the data sheet. You will see as freq goes up, so does loss. At 25 feet...eh its prob okay but that's your call as far as how much loss you can live with. I only use mine for HF.

1.  Is this OK to use for 2 meter? Your call, Lossy at this freq
2.  Is this OK to use for 440? Your call WAY Lossy at this freq
3.  Is this OK to use for HF? No worries
4.  Is it a OK to use a PL-259/SO-239 with 440? I have heard otherwise, but notice this is what many radios have on them. Its not really a problem IMO, A BNC or N is less but...
5.  How would I put a PL-259 or BNC connector on it being that it is slightly smaller than RG 58? Your a HAM, adapt it, I bought an adaptor for standard connectors. No comment on the BNC's, I HATE putting them on  Grin

If it were me, I would stick with at least 8X for short runs UHF/VHF, longer runs LMR 240 or 400.

73  Dave KD8GEH


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KC4YJI
Member

Posts: 27




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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2012, 02:41:17 AM »

Thanks for the replies.  I think I will try it and see how it does.  I am basically just trying to get an HT antenna above the roof to hit a few repeaters.  This will save batteries and I can leave this cable there with no worries if it gets damaged.  I hate to spend money on something that will hardly be used.  The rest of the cable I'll just use on HF.

73, Scott
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2371




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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2012, 11:19:43 AM »

http://vk1od.net/calc/tl/tllc.php

Online Transmission Loss Calculator.
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